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ROLAND GARROS

Roland Garros
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WTA Match Notes June 1
ATP Review Day 6
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ATP Special Review Costa Day 10
ATP Notes SemiFinals...Day 12
WTA Match Notes Final ... June 7
ATP Notes Finals ... Day 14 ... June 8



2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY 14
MEN’S FINAL NOTES
Sunday 8 June 2002



NO. 3 JUAN CARLOS FERRERO (ESP) v MARTIN VERKERK (NED)

At stake for the two finalists, in addition to the prestige of the Roland Garros title, is the following prize money and ATP Champions Race points:

Euros Points
Champion 840,000 200
Finalist 420,000 140

Roland Garros is guaranteed a new men’s champion this year, and will go ahead of the Australian Open for the Grand Slam event that has produced the most different champions in the Open Era.

Different champions
Australian Open 21
Roland Garros 21
Wimbledon 17
US Open 19

Roland Garros has been the scene of a player’s first Grand Slam title 18 times in the Open Era, soon to be 19 times. The event has had more than twice as many first-time Grand Slam champions as any of the other majors. Nine men have won their first Slam title at the Australian Open and nine at the US Open, while eight men have done so at Wimbledon (Open Era).



Head-to-head: Ferrero leads 1-0
2002 Kitzbuhel Clay (O) R16 Ferrero 75 62

Ahead of the final, Ferrero is already assured of the No. 1 position on the ATP Champions Race, having taken over the top spot from Andre Agassi with his semifinal defeat of Albert Costa.

By reaching the final, Verkerk currently shares joint-8th place on the Race standings with Felix Mantilla. If he wins today, he will go into 7th place, having entered Roland Garros in joint-30th place.

Ferrero v Verkerk

23 Age 24
6’0” / 1.83 Height 6’6” / 1.98
160 / 72 Weight 198 / 89
3 Entry Ranking 46
3 ATP Champions Race T30
6,736,911 Career Earnings (US$)* 431,820
767,561 2003 Earnings (US$)* 200,554
9 Career Titles 1
2 2003 Titles 1
39-12 Career Grand Slam Record 6-2
Finalist
2002-03 Roland Garros Best Grand Slam Result Finalist
2003 Roland Garros
22-3 Roland Garros Record 5-0
206-87 Career Record 28-28
120-27 Career Record – Clay 16-11
39-7 2003 Record 20-14
27-2 2003 Record – Clay 12-6
11-8 Career Five-Set Record 2-0
1 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
69-59 Career Tie-break Record 12-11
7-6 2003 Tie-break Record 10-8
13:52 Total Time on Court 15:57
*-earnings as of 26 May 2003

Road to the Final
Ferrero Time Time Verkerk
d. Michel Kratochvil 75 75 64 2:23 1st Round 1:39 d. Zeljko Krajan 63 64 64
d. Nicolas Massu 62 30 ret.* 0:43 2nd Round 2:49 d. Luis Horna 46 64 46 75 62
d. No. 25 Tim Henman 46 62 64 62 2:50 3rd Round 2:56 d. No. 29 Vince Spadea 57 64 62 75
d. No. 20 Felix Mantilla 62 61 61 1:40 Round of 16 2:01 d. No. 11 Rainer Schuettler 63 63 75
d. No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez
61 36 61 57 64 3:32 Quarterfinals 3:52 d. No. 4 Carlos Moya 63 64 57 46 86
d. No. 9 Albert Costa 63 76 64 2:44 Semifinals 2:40 d. No. 7 Guillermo Coria 76 64 76
* Massu had a left ankle injury, having sprained it in his previous match


Sets Won/Lost Games Won/Lost
Ferrero 16-3* 114-66
Verkerk 18-5 137-105
*not counting an incomplete set due Massu’s retirement

• Ferrero advanced to his second straight Roland Garros final with a straight-sets defeat of defending champion Albert Costa 63 76 64, avenging his defeat by his countryman in last year’s final. It was the fifth all-Spanish match-up of the tournament, and the victory extended Ferrero’s winning streak against his countrymen to 12 matches.

• Previously, with his 61 36 61 57 64 defeat of Fernando Gonzalez in the quarterfinals, Ferrero avenged his defeat in the 1998 Roland Garros boys’ final and two further defeats by the Chilean as a professional.

• Ferrero is playing his second consecutive Roland Garros final. Last year, Ferrero defeated No. 4 seed Andre Agassi 63 57 75 63 in the quarterfinals and No. 2 seed Marat Safin 63 62 64 in the semifinals. Albert Costa stopped Ferrero from winning his first Grand Slam tournament title by defeating him 61 60 46 63 in the final.

• Ferrero is one of 12 men to reach consecutive Roland Garros finals in the Open Era. Some of those men reached more than two consecutive finals, and two, Bjorn Borg and Mats Wilander, had two streaks of consecutive finals.

• Of the 11 previous men who reached consecutive Roland Garros finals, only Andre Agassi, to date, has failed to win the tournament at least one year during the streak. (Agassi did go on to win the title in 1999.)

Consecutive Roland Garros finals
Player Consecutive Finals Champion** Runner-up^
Bjorn Borg 4 (1978-79-80-81) 4 0
Ivan Lendl 4 (1984-85-86-87) 3 1
Jim Courier 3 (1991-92-93) 2 1
Rod Laver 2 (1968-69)* 1 1
Ken Rosewall 2 (1968-69)* 1 1
Jan Kodes 2 (1970-71) 2 0
Bjorn Borg 2 (1974-75) 2 0
Guillermo Vilas 2 (1977-78) 1 1
Mats Wilander 2 (1982-83) 1 1
Mats Wilander 2 (1987-88) 1 1
Andre Agassi 2 (1990-91) 0 2
Sergi Bruguera 2 (1993-94) 2 0
Gustavo Kuerten 2 (2000-01) 2 0
Juan Carlos Ferrero 2 (2002-03) 0??? 1???
* Also reached Roland Garros finals pre-Open Era
** - does not include all career titles, only those from two or more consecutive finals
^ - does not include all career runner-up finishes, only those from two or more consecutive finals

• This is Ferrero’s first Grand Slam meeting with a Dutchman. His career win-loss record against Dutch opponents is 2-5.
Ferrero vs. Dutchmen
Event Player Result
2000 Long Island Richard Krajicek Lost 63 64 in R16
2000 Vienna Richard Krajicek Lost 64 64 in 1st rd
2000 Basle Richard Krajicek Lost 64 63 in 1st rd
2001 Davis Cup 1st rd Raemon Sluiter Lost 67 76 36 76 64 in R1
2001 TMS Rome Sjeng Schalken Won 63 75 in 1st rd
2002 Kitzbuhel Martin Verkerk Won 75 62 in R16
2003 Rotterdam Raemon Sluiter Lost 1-2 ret. in QF
(twisted right ankle)

• A No. 11 seed has won the Roland Garros title 11 times in the Open Era, but not since 1988, when Mats Wilander defeated Henri Leconte 75 62 61 to claim his third and final title here.

• Ferrero was a junior boys' runners-up at Roland Garros, losing the 1998 boys' final to Fernando Gonzalez 46 64 63. The last former junior runner-up to go on to win the men's title at Roland Garros was Thomas Muster, who claimed the senior title in 1995, ten years after finishing runner-up to Jaime Yzaga in the junior boys' competition. (The last former junior champion to win the men's title was Mats Wilander in 1988.)

• If he wins his first Grand Slam title today, Ferrero will go into joint-first place for clay-court matches won in 2003, catching up with Gaston Gaudio, who headed the list going into Roland Garros. Ferrero started the tournament in fourth place. [See table overleaf.]

2003 Kings of Clay (to completion of semifinals)
Rank Player Win-Loss
1 Gaston Gaudio (ARG) 28-10
2. Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) 27-2
3. Carlos Moya (ESP) 27-7
4. Agustin Calleri (ARG) 24-9
5. Guillermo Coria (ARG) 23-5
6. Felix Mantilla (ESP) 18-7
7. Nikolay Davydenko (RUS) 17-10
8. Fernando Gonzalez (CHI) 16-6
9. Tommy Robredo (ESP) 15-6
10. Jarkko Nieminen (FIN) 15-7

• Ferrero has won seven clay court title so far in his career, and stands in joint-seventh place for title won on the surface by active players. If he defeats Verkerk today, he will go ahead of Andre Agassi, Francisco Clavet and Magnus Norman into sole possession for seventh place.

Rank Player Clay court titles
1. Gustavo Kuerten 13
2. Albert Costa 12
3. Carlos Moya 11
4. Alex Corretja 10
Felix Mantilla 10
6. Marcelo Rios 9
7. Andre Agassi 7
Francisco Clavet 7
Juan Carlos Ferrero 7
Magnus Norman 7

• Ferrero says he feels in much better shape than during 2002 Roland Garros. Last year, he sprained his ankle in practise before his second round match, and was unsure for a time that he would be able to continue in the tournament. He recovered enough to carry on, but after losing the final said: “I made a lot of mistakes, maybe because I had some problems with my body. I felt some pain in my legs, abductor, and also my abdominal. I tried all the time to play well in the final, but in the first two sets I couldn't play because I felt so much pain.”

• Ferrero’s defeat of Gonzalez in the quarterfinals was Ferrero’s first five-setter of the tournament and improved his five-set record to 11-8. His five-set record at Roland Garros is 4-1, his only loss being to Gustavo Kuerten 75 46 26 64 63 on his first semifinal appearance in 2000.

• Ferrero won the first 12 clay court matches he played this year, including the title at TMS Monte Carlo, where he defeated Guillermo Coria 62 62 in the final. Marat Safin ended Ferrero’s streak in the semifinals of Barcelona, winning 64 63. Ferrero then started a nine-match winning streak, also on clay, including the title at Valencia, before retiring from his semifinal match against Roger Federer at TMS Rome because of tendonitis in his right shoulder.

• Even though Ferrero began 2002 battling injury (he missed the 2002 Australian Open because of a knee injury), his year thus far has been remarkably better. He entered Roland Garros having won more than twice as many matches (33-7 in 2003 vs. 15-11 in 2002). In fact, his 33 match wins to the start of the tournament are almost 70 percent of his total match victories (48) for 2002.

• Ferrero had some good results on hard court at the start of the season, reaching the final at Sydney (losing to Hyung-Taik Lee 46 76 76) and a week later reaching the quarters at Australian Open (losing to Wayne Ferreira 76 76 61).


• By defeating Guillermo Coria in the semifinals, Verkerk has become the first Dutch man in history to reach the final of the French championships. (The tournament was first played in 1891 and became an international event in 1925.) Verkerk was already just the third different Dutchman to reach the Roland Garros semifinals in the Open Era, joining Tom Okker (1969) and Richard Krajicek (1993).

• In the Open Era, only two other Dutchmen have reached Grand Slam finals and only one Dutchmen, Richard Krajicek, has won a Grand Slam title.

Dutchmen in Grand Slam Finals (Open Era)
Event Player Final result
1968 US Open Tom Okker Runner-up – lost to Arthur Ashe 1412 57 63 36 63
1996 Wimbledon Richard Krajicek Champion – def. Malivai Washington 63 64 63
2003 Roland Garros Martin Verkerk vs. Juan Carlos Ferrero ???

• Okker was No. 8 seed when he advanced to the US Open final in 1968. Krajicek, although not given a numbered seeding at 1996 Wimbledon, was in fact a seed, as the highest-ranked non-seeded player taking the position of the No. 7 after he withdrew through injury.

• Verkerk has become the third man in the Open Era to reach the final here on his Roland Garros debut and is bidding to become the second player after Mats Wilander to win the championship on his first appearance here. Like Verkerk today, Mats Wilander was also unseeded.

First Roland Garros, First Final
Year Player Final result
1982 Mats Wilander Defeated Guillermo Vilas 16 76 60 64
1986 Mikael Pernfors Lost to Ivan Lendl 63 62 64
2003 Martin Verkerk vs. Juan Carlos Ferrero ???

• This is Verkerk’s third Grand Slam tournament overall and he is the 6th man in the Open Era to reach a Grand Slam final within three Open Era Grand Slam appearances. Nobody, in fact, has advanced to a Grand Slam final in fewer than three appearances in the Open Era. Of the previous five players, three – Gustavo Kuerten and Mats Wilander, both at Roland Garros, plus Mark Edmondson at the 1976 Australian Open – won the title.

• Not only is this just Verkerk’s third major, but he had not won a match at either of his first two. Of the three players who won a Grand Slam title within three appearances in a major – Kuerten, Wilander and Edmondson – all had at least one match victory at a previous Grand Slam tournament. Mikael Pernfors and Steve Denton, who finished runners-up, did not.
Three attempts or less to reach first Grand Slam final

Player
Event Grand Slam events played Result in first final
Martin Verkerk 2003 Roland Garros 3 ???
Gustavo Kuerten 1997 Roland Garros 3 Champion
Mikael Pernfors 1986 Roland Garros 3 Runner-up
Mats Wilander 1982 Roland Garros 3 Champion
Steve Denton 1981 Australian Open 3 Runner-up
Mark Edmondson 1976 Australian Open 3 Champion

• Prior to 2003 Roland Garros, Verkerk had played two Grand Slam events and lost in the first round of both. As a qualifier at the 2002 US Open, he fell to Andy Roddick 76 63 64. At this year’s Australian Open, he fell to Mark Philippoussis 64 64 67 63.

• Verkerk is bidding to become the first unseeded Roland Garros champion since Gustavo Kuerten in 1997. In the Open Era, Roland Garros has seen seven unseeded finalists, of which two went on to become unseeded champions, Kuerten following in the path of Mats Wilander in 1982. [See table overleaf.]

Unseeded Roland Garros finalists (Open Era)
Year Player Ranking Final result
1973 Niki Pilic (YUG) Not available ^ Lost to Ilie Nastase 63 63 60
1979 Victor Pecci (PAR) 29 Lost to Bjorn Borg 63 61 67 64
1982 Mats Wilander (SWE) 18 Defeated Guillermo Vilas 16 76 60 64
1986 Mikael Pernfors (SWE) 27 Lost to Ivan Lendl 63 62 64
1994 Alberto Berasategui (ESP) 23 Lost to Sergi Bruguera 63 75 26 61
1997 Gustavo Kuerten (BRA) 66 Defeated Sergi Bruguera 63 64 62
1999 Andrei Medvedev (UKR) 100 Lost Andre Agassi 16 26 64 63 64
2003 Martin Verkerk (NED) 46* vs. Juan Carlos Ferrero ???
^ ATP rankings started in August 1973 * using the ATP Entry Ranking

• If he wins the final, Verkerk will be the fourth lowest-ranked man to win a Grand Slam title in Open Era history and the history of the ATP rankings. Albert Costa had an Entry Ranking of No. 22 when he won the 2002 Roland Garros title.

Ranking Player Event Result
No. 212 Mark Edmondson 1976 Australian Open Champion
No. 188 John Marks 1978 Australian Open Runner-up
No. 125 Goran Ivanisevic 2001 Wimbledon Champion
No. 100 Andrei Medvedev 1999 Roland Garros Runner-up
No. 91 Chris Lewis 1983 Wimbledon Runner-up
No. 66 Gustavo Kuerten 1997 Roland Garros Champion
No. 54 Steve Denton 1981 Australian Open Runner-up
No. 51 John Lloyd 1977 Australian Open (Dec) Runner-up
No. 46 Martin Verkerk 2003 Roland Garros ???
No. 45 John Sadri 1979 Australian Open Runner-up

• Verkerk’s path to the final at 2003 Roland Garros has been dotted with personal achievements. He won his first Grand Slam tournament match when he defeated Zeljko in the first round, then played and won the first five-set match of his career when he defeated Luis Horna in the second round.

• Verkerk saved three match points in his 46 64 46 75 62 second round defeat of Horna. In the fourth set, he was trailing 2-5 and 0-40 on his serve, before coming back to win. Gustavo Kuerten was the last man to win the Roland Garros title after being match point down, surviving Michael Russell’s match point against him in the third set of their round of 16 match in 2001. Kuerten won that match 36 46 76 63 61. Since 1925, there have been five players who have won Roland Garros after saving at least one match point during the tournament.

• Verkerk’s defeat of Moya in the quarterfinals was his first victory against a Top 5 player. The highest-ranked player Verkerk had defeated previously in his career (encompassing only 28 events, not including Davis Cup, but including 2003 Roland Garros) was Andy Roddick, who was No. 6 when Verkerk beat him 67 63 64 in the second round of TMS Rome. (Verkerk advanced past then-No. 5 Tim Henman by walkover in the round of 16 at 2002 Indianapolis, but walkovers do not count toward win-loss records.)

• His defeat of Moya in the quarterfinals here improved Verkerk’s win-loss record against Spanish men to 2-5. His lone previous victory was in the first round of 2002 Kitzbuhel, where Verkerk defeated Galo Blanco 75 67 64 in the first round.

• Verkerk attempted to qualify for last year’s Roland Garros, and got to the third and final round of the qualifying tournament before losing in three sets to Frenchman Eric Prodon 57 63 63.

• Verkerk came into Roland Garros with a career-best Entry Ranking of No. 46. Having climbed 84 places last year, he has continued his improvement into this season. He won his first singles title at Milan in February, defeating Ivan Ljubicic 36 75 76 in the semifinals and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 57 75 in the final, and performed well in the latter half of the European clay court season. Said Verkerk after winning on indoor carpet at Milan: “Before, I was saying that clay was my best surface, but it would be stupid to say it now.”

• Verkerk played his first live Davis Cup singles match for the Netherlands in the nation’s World Group first round tie versus Switzerland, played in Arnhem in February. (He made his Davis Cup debut in a dead fourth rubber in September 2002). Having teamed with Paul Haarhuis to win the doubles, Verkerk lost the decisive fifth rubber to Michel Kratochvil 16 76 76 61, despite hitting 30 aces. (The Netherlands host India in September’s Davis Cup World Group Play-offs.)

• Verkerk has now won 12 of his last 14 matches. He reached the semifinals last week at St Polten, falling to Nikolay Davydenko 75 61, and before that the quarters at TMS Rome, where Kafelnikov took revenge for Milan, defeating Verkerk 63 75.

• Verkerk has been coached by Nick Carr of New Zealand since October 2001.
TOP OF PAGE


 ROLAND GARROS – Paris-FRA
CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH NOTES
Saturday 7 June 2003



ALL-BELGIAN FINAL MAKES HISTORY
Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin-Hardenne will compete in the first-ever all-Belgian Grand Slam final on Saturday. Belgium is the fourth nation to have an all-country final in the history of Roland Garros since 1925:

UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 1930, 1946, 1947, 1950-53, 1982, 1984-86, 2002
AUSTRALIA 1962, 1965, 1971
FRANCE 1938
BELGIUM 2003

On the WTA Tour, this is the fifth singles final between two Belgian women:
1997 – Cardiff – Dominique Van Roost d. Laurence Courtois
1999 – Luxembourg – Kim Clijsters d. Dominique Van Roost
2001 – ’s-Hertogenbosch – Justine Henin-Hardenne d. Kim Clijsters
2003 – German Open – Justine Henin-Hardenne d. Kim Clijsters
2003 – Roland Garros - Justine Henin-Hardenne vs. Kim Clijsters


BELGIAN COMPARISON
While the personalities, backgrounds and playing styles of Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin-Hardenne are different, the similarities in their rise up the WTA Tour ladder has been uncanny. The following is a look at their parallel rise:

KIM CLIJSTERS JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE
1999 Antwerp Professional WTA Tour debut 1999 Antwerp
1999 Luxembourg Won first WTA singles title 1999 Antwerp
1999 Wimbledon
(beat world No.10 Coetzer) Debut Grand Slam 1999 Roland Garros
(almost beat Davenport on Chatrier)
2001 Roland Garros First time reaching SF Grand Slam 2001 Roland Garros
2001 Roland Garros First Grand Slam F 2001 Wimbledon
2003 Roland Garros Second Grand Slam F 2003 Roland Garros
June 11, 2001 First time reaching Top 10 June 11, 2001

July 30, 2001 First time reaching Top Five
* On May 20, 2002 both ranked in Top Five for first time together
* On January 27, 2003 both ranked in Top Four
* On June 9, 2003 both will rank in Top Three
July 9, 2001
Indian Wells, Rome Only players in 2003 to win multiple Tier I titles Charleston, Berlin


GUARANTEED A NEW GRAND SLAM WINNER
Who will become the ninth active player (after Seles, S. Williams, V. Williams, Davenport, Capriati, Pierce, Majoli & Martinez), the 30th player in the Open Era or the 18th at Roland Garros since 1968 to win their first Grand Slam tournament? Check out page 8 for a complete listing of Open Era major champs.



TOP BILLING DOESN’T GUARANTEE SUCCESS
The No.1 seed has won only once since 1994 at Roland Garros, when Steffi Graf claimed the title in 1996. Since 1925, the No.1-seeded woman has won 31 of the 72 singles championships held at Roland Garros a 43.05 winning percentage. In the Open era (since 1968), the top seed has won 15 of 35 titles at Roland Garros a 42.86 winning percentage. The No.1 seed has also been beaten in the semifinals here for the past four years and five of the past six.


No.1-seeded champions
Suzanne Lenglen (FRA) 1925/26
Helen Wills Moody (USA) 1928/29/30
Cilly Ausseem (GER) 1931
Hilde Sperling (GER) 1936/37
Simone Mathieu (FRA) 1938/39
Margaret Osbourne DuPont (USA) 1949
Margaret Connolly (USA) 1953/54 Shirley Bloomer (GBR) 1957
Margaret Smith Court (AUS) 1964/69/70/73
Chris Evert (USA) 1974/75/79/80
Sue Barker (GBR) 1976
Mima Jausovec (YUG) 1977
Martina Navratilova (USA) 1984
Steffi Graf (GER) 1988/93/96 Monica Seles (YUG) 1991/92

No.1 seed performance since 1994 (opponent):
1994 Steffi Graf l. SF Mary Pierce
1995 Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario l. F Steffi Graf
1996 Steffi Graf WON Arantxa Sanchez-Vicario
1997 Martina Hingis l. F Iva Majoli
1998 Martina Hingis l. SF Monica Seles
1999 Martina Hingis l. F Steffi Graf
2000 Martina Hingis l. SF Mary Pierce
2001 Martina Hingis l. SF Jennifer Capriati
2002 Jennifer Capriati l. SF Serena Williams
2003 Serena Williams l. SF Justine Henin-Hardenne


PARIS IS THE PLACE FOR UPSETS
Since 1981, the number one seed has only won a total of six titles in 23 attempts - a 26% record, the least success for any top seed at a Grand Slam. The following is a look at some of the more dramatic upsets of the world No.1 during that time:

YEAR – No.1 (losing opponent) UPSET
1981 – C. EVERT lost SF to Hana Mandlikova Evert had won 33 consecutive matches coming into SF
1983 – M. NAVRATILOVA lost 4r to Kathleen Horvath Navratilova had won 39 consecutive matches coming into 4r and would suffer her only loss of 1983 (86-1)
1985 – M. NAVRATILOVA lost F to Chris Evert Evert scored only her second win over Navratilova in their preceding 17 matches and would regain the No.1 ranking
1987 – M. NAVRATILOVA lost F to Steffi Graf Graf wins her first Grand Slam title appearing in her first major final, while Navratilova was playing her 25th
1989 – S. GRAF lost F to Arantxa Sanchez World No.10 Sanchez ends Graf’s unbeaten 31-match run of 1989 and would be the only player to beat her in nine straight Slams
1990 – S. GRAF lost F to Monica Seles Playing only her fourth career Grand Slam and 19th pro event, No.2 seed Seles becomes youngest ever winner of Roland Garros
1994 – S. GRAF lost SF to Mary Pierce No.12 seed Pierce hands Graf only her second loss of 44 matches in 1994 in her debut Grand Slam SF; Graf was playing her 28th
1997 – M. HINGIS lost F to Iva Majoli No.9 seed Majoli ends Hingis’ unbeaten 37-match win streak of 1997 and her only Grand Slam loss of the year
1999 – M. HINGIS lost F to Steffi Graf No.6 seed Graf claims her seventh French singles title – 12 years after her first – after being three points from defeat in a dramatic final
2003 – S. WILLIAMS lost SF to Justine Henin-Hardenne Henin-Hardenne ends Williams’ unbeaten 33-match run in Grand Slams

HAPPY BIRTHDAY
One day shy of her 20th birthday, Kim Clijsters will aim to give herself a birthday present to remember: her first Grand Slam singles title. Should Clijsters win the title, she would join the other 10 women who have won Roland Garros while still a teenager: Connolly, Truman, Court, Goolagong, Evert, Mandlikova, Graf, Sanchez, Seles and Majoli.



GOING FOR THE DOUBLE
One down, one to go. That’s the task facing Justine Henin-Hardenne when she lines up against Kim Clijsters in Saturday’s final. Having defeated the top seed and defending champion Serena Williams in the semifinals, Henin-Hardenne must now take out the No.2 seed Clijsters. Not too many players have defeated the Top Two ranked players in the world at a Grand Slam in the Open Era (since 1968). The following is a look at the nine women who have done it:

YEAR PLAYER (Seed) BEATEN TOP TWO-RANKED PLAYERS & GRAND SLAM
*1968 Wade, Virginia (6): JONES (2) & KING (1) - US Open
*1969 Jones, Ann (4): COURT (1) & KING (2) - Wimbledon
*1971 Goolagong, Evonne (3): KING (2) & COURT (1) - Wimbledon
1979 Austin, Tracy (3): NAVRATILOVA (2) & EVERT (1) - US Open
1985 Mandlikova, Hana (4): EVERT (1) & NAVRATILOVA (2) - US Open
1999 Graf, Steffi (6) DAVENPORT (2) & HINGIS (1) – Roland Garros
1999 Williams, Serena (7) DAVENPORT (2) & HINGIS (1) – US Open
2000 Williams, Venus (5) HINGIS (1) & DAVENPORT (2) – Wimbledon
2000 Williams, Venus (3) HINGIS (1) & DAVENPORT (2) – US Open
2001 Capriati, Jennifer (12) DAVENPORT (2) & HINGIS (1) – Australian Open
2002 Williams, Serena (3) CAPRIATI (1) & V. WILLIAMS (2) – Roland Garros
* Prior to the introduction of computer rankings in 1975


WINNING CLUES
In the Open Era, only four players have won the Italian Open and the French Open in the same year, while the same is true for the German Open winner in the same year. Interestingly enough, for the past 19 years since 1985, the German Open final has provided at least one of the French Open finalists a few weeks later every year except 1997 and 1998.

GERMAN OPEN – FRENCH OPEN ITALIAN OPEN – FRENCH OPEN
1976 Sue Barker
1983 Chris Evert
1985 Chris Evert
1987 Steffi Graf
1988 Steffi Graf
1993 Steffi Graf
1996 Steffi Graf
1990 Monica Seles
2003 Justine Henin-Hardenne ???
1974 Chris Evert
1975 Chris Evert
1980 Chris Evert
1987 Steffi Graf
1990 Monica Seles
2002 Serena Williams
2003 Kim Clijsters ???


TWO IN A ROW IS NOT SO EASY
By halting Serena’s Grand Slam unbeaten run at 33 matches, Justine Henin-Hardenne becomes the first player since Jennifer Capriati (at Roland Garros-Wimbledon 2001) to score back-to-back victories over the younger Williams. Ironically it was Henin-Hardenne who became the first person in 2003 to defeat Serena in Charleston just seven weeks ago, ending her 21-match run for the season. Serena has now lost in her last three consecutive tournaments (Charleston, Rome and Roland Garros), something that has not occurred for two years. Since Serena won her first singles title at the Open Gaz de France in 1999, the longest drought she has suffered has been three or four tournaments as the following list illustrates:

3 – 2003 Charleston-Italian Open-Roland Garros
4 – 2001 Miami-Roland Garros-Wimbledon-Los Angeles
4 – 2000 Indian Wells-Miami-Amelia Island-Wimbledon
3 – 1999 Filderstadt-2000 Australian Open-Paris Indoors
4 – 1999 Miami-Italian Open-German Open-Roland Garros





AMERICAN RUN HALTED
With an all-Belgian final this year, the United States’ steak of 11 consecutive Grand Slam titles has been snapped. Due to Venus Williams, Jennifer Capriati and Serena Williams’ success, the United States had dominated the women’s Grand Slam circuit, securing 14 of the last 15 Grand Slams. The last time American women dominated Grand Slams like this was in 1981-86 when Martina Navratilova combined with Chris Evert and Tracy Austin to win 17 straight and 21 of 22. Here is a comparison of the two US dynasties:

1999 Wimbledon - Lindsay Davenport 1981 Wimbledon - Chris Evert
1999 US Open - Serena Williams 1981 US Open - Tracy Austin
2000 Australian Open - Lindsay Davenport 1981* Australian Open - Martina Navratilova
2000 Roland Garros - Mary Pierce (FRA) 1982 Roland Garros - Martina Navratilova
2000 Wimbledon - Venus Williams 1982 Wimbledon - Martina Navratilova
2000 US Open - Venus Williams 1982 US Open - Chris Evert
2001 Australian Open - Jennifer Capriati 1982* Australian Open - Chris Evert
2001 Roland Garros - Jennifer Capriati 1983 Roland Garros - Chris Evert
2001 Wimbledon - Venus Williams 1983 Wimbledon - Martina Navratilova
2001 US Open - Venus Williams 1983 US Open - Martina Navratilova
2002 Australian Open - Jennifer Capriati 1983* Australian Open - Martina Navratilova
2002 Roland Garros - Serena Williams 1984 Roland Garros - Martina Navratilova
2002 Wimbledon – Serena Williams 1984 Wimbledon - Martina Navratilova
2002 US Open –Serena Williams 1984 US Open - Martina Navratilova
2003 Australian Open – Serena Williams 1984* Australian Open - Chris Evert
1985 Roland Garros - Chris Evert
1985 Wimbledon - Martina Navratilova
1985 US Open - Hana Mandlikova (TCH)
1985* Australian Open - Martina Navratilova
1986 Roland Garros - Chris Evert
1986 Wimbledon - Martina Navratilova
1986 US Open - Martina Navratilova
* Note: Australian Open was held in December from 1977-1985


WHAT A DIFFERENCE A YEAR MAKES!
From both Kim Clijsters’ and Justine Henin-Hardenne’s point of view, losing in the third and first rounds in 2002 respectively could have been the lucky talisman they needed. For the last few years, the players who have reached the final of Roland Garros have fared poorly at the event the year before. The 2002 runner-up Venus Williams lost in the first round the previous year. The 2001 finalists Jennifer Capriati and Kim Clijsters both lost in the first round in 2000. Never in women’s professional tennis history had that happened at a Grand Slam before. In 1999, the 2000 champion Mary Pierce lost in the second round. In 1998, the 1999 champion Steffi Graf did not even play in the tournament due to a calf injury.


RANKING PROJECTIONS
Rank
Jun 9 (Previous Rank)
1. (1) Serena Williams
2. (2) Kim Clijsters
3. (4) Justine Henin-Hardenne
4. (3) Venus Williams
5. (6) Lindsay Davenport
6. (5) Amelie Mauresmo
7. (8) Chanda Rubin
8. (7) Jennifer Capriati
9. (9) Daniela Hantuchova
10.(10) Anastasia Myskina 11. (11) Jelena Dokic
12. (15) Ai Sugiyama
13. (16) Magdalena Maleeva
14. (14) Eleni Daniilidou
15. (13) Elena Dementieva
16. (17) Amanda Coetzer
17. (22) Conchita Martinez
18. (12) Monica Seles
19. (19) Meghann Shaughnessy
20. (21) Vera Zvonareva
* Nadia Petrova is projected to move from No.76 to No.29



ROAD TO THE FINAL

(2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2)
R128: d. Amy Frazier (USA #41) 62 60 (0:45)
R64: d. Marlene Weingärtner (GER #72) 62 62 (0:52)
R32: d. (30) Paola Suárez (ARG #31) 62 61 (1:04)
R16: d. (15) Magdalena Maleeva (BUL #16) 06 62 61 (1:21)
QF: d. (24) Conchita Martinez (ESP #22) 62 61 (1:09)
SF: d. Nadia Petrova (RUS #76) 75 61 (1:10)
Total games: 100
Won/lost: 73/27
Total time on court: 6:21


vs. (4) JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE (BEL #4)
R128: d. Patricia Wartusch (AUT #82) 63 75 (1:22)
R64: d. Jelena Kostanic (CRO #109) 62 62 (1:13)
R32: d. Dally Randriantefy (MAD #83) 61 61 (0:50)
R16: d. (19) Patty Schnyder (SUI #18) 63 26 62 (1:50)
QF: d. (8) Chanda Rubin (USA #8) 63 62 (1:06)
SF: d. (1) Serena Williams (USA #1) 62 46 75 (2:20)
Total games: 122
Won/lost: 80/42
Total time on court: 8:41


IT’S DOWN TO THE LAST TWO…
PLAYER RANK NAT AGE YTD PRIZE $* YTD W/L CAREER PRIZE $* CAREER W/L
[2] Kim Clijsters 2 BEL 19 1,153,069 42/5 4,802,349 235/70
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 4 BEL 21 745,888 35/5 3,171,138 245/76
*Match records are up to date through the semifinals; prize money figures do not include this tournament


K. CLIJSTERS vs. J. HENIN-HARDENNE
WIN-LOSS % WIN-LOSS %
Career 235-70 77% Career 245-76 76%
2003 42-5 89% 2003 35-5 88%
Grand Slam* 46-15 75% Grand Slam* 45-14 76%
French Open* 14-3 82% French Open* 12-3 80%
* Includes main draw Grand Slam matches only and 2003 results at Roland Garros up to but not including final


CAREER GRAND SLAM FINAL RECORDS*
Player Australian Open Roland Garros Wimbledon US Open Total
[2] Kim Clijsters 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-0 0-1
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 0-0 0-0 0-1 0-0 0-1
* Does not include results from Roland Garros 2003



HISTORY OF THE SEEDS – Roland Garros
The No.2 seed has gone on to reach the final 15 times in the Open Era, winning 10 of those championship matches, a pretty impressive statistic. The No.4 seed on the other hand has reached just 6 finals, winning three:

No.2 seed WINNER (10) – 1968, 1978, 1982, 1983, 1985, 1986, 1987, 1990, 1994, 1995
FINALIST (5) – 1973, 1975, 1984, 1992, 2002
No.4 seed WINNER (3) – 1981, 1998, 2001
FINALIST (3) – 1979, 1982, 1996

CHAMPIONSHIP MATCH

(2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2) vs. (4) JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE (BEL #4)
Head-to-Head: Clijsters leads 7-3 (note: does not include two ITF meetings which Henin won in 1998 and 1999)

On Clay: Henin-Hardenne leads 2-1 (having won the last two, in 2002 and 2003)
Grand Slams: Clijsters leads 2-0
Singles Finals: Henin-Hardenne leads 2-0
Last Meeting: 2003 German Open (Red Clay/Outdoors), Final, Henin-Hardenne won 64 46 75*
* saved three match points serving at 4-5 final set




Clijsters Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 12 WTA Tour career prize money: $4,802,349

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fourth consecutive appearance in this event; finalist in 2001, d. compatriot Henin-Hardenne in 3s SF the day before her 18th birthday; was four times just two points from winning title before falling to Capriati 16 64 1210 in longest third set to a women’s final in the tournament’s history; surprise 3r loser to C.Fernandez as the No.4 seed last year

2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Rome; FINALIST (3): Antwerp, Scottsdale, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (2): Australian Open, Miami
• Reached SF or better at all eight tournaments, her most consistent start to a season; started 2003 by winning Sydney to become only fourth player in last 20 years (Graf, Seles and Navratilova) to win three or more consecutive titles without loss of a set (2002 Luxembourg and Championships) and continued to Australian Open SF where she led 51 third set and held 2 mp at 52 vs. world No.1 and eventual champion S.Williams before falling 46 63 75; on home soil, reached Antwerp final, d. No.4 Henin-Hardenne in SF (l. to V.Williams); finalist in Scottsdale, serving for the match vs. Sugiyama before falling in 3s; collected career-first Tier I singles title at Indian Wells as No.1 seed, d. Davenport in final; extended win streak to 10 by reaching Miami SF (l. to S.Williams); on 14 April, ascended to world No.2 WTA Ranking, the sixth youngest to do so (after Jaeger, Hingis, Austin, Seles and Graf); in Berlin, scored her first win over Capriati and held 3 mp in final vs. Henin-Hardenne before falling 64 46 75; won second Tier I title of the season in Rome, avenging Scottsdale loss to Sugyiama and d. Mauresmo in the final after Mauresmo served for the match leading 63 65; in doubles, has won three titles to date (all w/Sugiyama) at Sydney, Antwerp and Scottsdale

CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Rome; first title came at 1999 Luxembourg as a qualifier; runner-up at 2001 Roland Garros, d. Henin-Hardenne in SF after trailing 62 42 and in final, was two points from victory vs. Capriati on four occasions before falling 16 64 1210, featuring the longest third set in a Roland Garros women’s singles final; also semifinalist at 2002 and 2003 Australian Opens; member of the Belgian Fed Cup Team 2000-03, helping her country win its first-ever title in 2001; winner of seven Tour doubles titles; mixed doubles runner-up at 2000 Wimbledon (w/Hewitt)

CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.2 (14 April – 5 May, 12 May 2003 – present)
• Coached by Marc Dehous since July 2002; physical trainer is Eveline Coppens



Henin-Hardenne Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,171,138

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her fourth appearance here; semifinalist in 2001, holding a 62 42 lead on compatriot Clijsters before falling in 3s; last year as No.5 seed was suffering from bronchitis and fell 1r to qualifier Kapros in 3s; right elbow injury prevented her from taking part in 2000; in 1999 2r, almost stunned world No.2 Davenport on Court Central before falling 75 final set

2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Dubai, Charleston, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (4): Sydney, Australian Open, Antwerp, Amelia Island
• Began season as semifinalist in Sydney (losing to eventual winner Clijsters 62 63) and Australian Open, surviving marathon 4r vs. Davenport in second longest match (in terms of total games played) played there from 4r on in the Open Era, winning 75 57 97 before being halted by world No.2 V.Williams in SF; in Antwerp, reached SF, falling to compatriot Clijsters 62 76(3) after trailing 5-2 second set; won title at Dubai as top seed, d. No.3 seed Capriati in SF and No.4 seed Seles in F; reached QF in Miami falling to Rubin; scored first ever-win over a world No.1 when she ended Serena Williams unbeaten 21-0 run in 2003 in the final of Charleston on April 13; fell in SF Amelia Island as top seed to Dementieva after holding a mp; joined Graf as only second player in Berlin tournament’s history to retain the German Open d. Mauresmo (saving sp in first set) and Clijsters (saving 3 mp in third set)

CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of nine WTA Tour singles titles and two doubles titles; runner-up at 2001 Wimbledon and semifinalist at 2001 Roland Garros, 2002 Wimbledon and 2003 Australian Open; one of only four current players (along with Clijsters, Seles & Davenport) to have wins over S.Williams, V.Williams and Capriati; in 1999, won Antwerp in her Tour debut, becoming the fifth player at that stage to achieve that feat; member of Belgian Fed Cup team 2000-03 (winning title in 2001)

CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.4 (28 October – 10 November 2002, 27 January 2003 - present)
• Coached by Carlos Rodriguez since 1996


THERE IS NOTHING LIKE THE FIRST TIME

Because Kim Clijsters and Justine Henin-Hardenne are challenging for their first Grand Slam singles title, either one is guaranteed to become the 30th woman in Open Tennis history to win a Grand Slam.

Since the Open Era of tennis began at the 1968 French Open, there have been 29 different singles champions for the 140 Grand Slam tournaments held during that time. Many winners have often referred to the first Grand Slam title as the most special championship of their career - 17 of the 29 total different winners have won multiple Grand Slam singles titles.

The most popular site to win the first Grand Slam title has been the red clay of Roland Garros, Paris where 10 of the 29 Open Era Grand Slam winners have been crowned as first-time Champions.

Age First Total (singles)
Player (Nationality) Yrs, Mos Grand Slam C'ship Open-Era GS Titles

Austin, Tracy (USA) 16,9 1979 US Open 2
Barker, Sue (GBR) 20,2 1976 Roland Garros 1
Capriati, Jennifer (USA) 24,10 2001 Australian Open 3
*Court, Margaret (AUS) 26,6 1969 Australian Open 11
Davenport, Lindsay (USA) 22,3 1998 US Open 3
Evert, Chris (USA) 19,6 1974 Roland Garros 18
Goolagong-Cawley, Evonne (AUS) 19,10 1971 Roland Garros 7
Graf, Steffi (GER) 17,11 1987 Roland Garros 22
Hingis, Martina (SUI) 16,4 1997 Australian Open 4
Jausovec, Mima (YUG) 20,1 1977 Roland Garros 1
**Jones, Ann (GBR) 30,9 1969 Wimbledon 1
Jordan, Barbara (USA) 22,8 1979 Australian Open 1
***King, Billie Jean (USA) 24,8 1968 Wimbledon 8
Majoli, Iva (CRO) 19,10 1997 Roland Garros 1
Mandlikova, Hana (TCH/AUS) 18,10 1980 Australian Open 4
Martinez, Conchita (ESP) 22,3 1994 Wimbledon 1
Navratilova, Martina (TCH/USA) 21,9 1978 Wimbledon 18
Novotna, Jana (CZE) 29,9 1998 Wimbledon 1
O' Neil, Christine (AUS) 22,9 1978 Australian Open 1
Pierce, Mary (FRA) 20 1995 Australian Open 2
Melville-Reid, Kerry (AUS) 29,4 1976 Australian Open 1
****Richey-Gunter, Nancy (USA) 25,10 1968 Roland Garros 1
Ruzici, Virginia (ROM) 23,4 1978 Roland Garros 1
Sabatini, Gabriela (ARG) 20,4 1990 US Open 1
Sanchez-Vicario, Arantxa (ESP) 17,6 1989 Roland Garros 4
Seles, Monica (YUG/USA) 16,6 1990 Roland Garros 9
Wade, Virginia (GBR) 23,2 1968 US Open 3
Williams, Serena (USA) 17,11 1999 US Open 5
Williams, Venus (USA) 20 2000 Wimbledon 4


* Court won her first Grand Slam title at the 1960 Australian Championships aged 17 years, six months, and followed with 12 more titles between 1960 and 1966

** Jones won two pre-Open Era Grand Slam titles: her first at the 1961 French Championships, aged 22 years, eight months and a second at the French again in 1966

*** King won four titles prior to the Open Era: (Wimbledon 1966-67, US Open 1967 and the 1968 Australian Championships); King was aged 22 years, eight months at the time of her first GS win at Wimbledon 1966

**** Richey won the 1967 Australian Open (aged 24 years, four months) and the 1968 French Open - the 1st Grand Slam tournament of the Open Era



ROLAND GARROS IN THE OPEN ERA (1968 Present)
Site: Since 1925 Stade Roland Garros
Surface: Terre Battu (Red Clay)


Year (Rk) CHAMPION (seed) (Nat) (Rk) FINALIST (seed) (Nat) Score
1968 Nancy Richey Gunter (2) USA Ann Haydon Jones (1) GBR 5 7, 6 4, 6 1
1969 Margaret Smith Court (1) AUS Ann Jones (3) GBR 6 1, 4 6, 6 3
1970 Margaret Court (1) AUS Helga Niessen Masthoff (7) GER 6 2, 6 4
1971 Evonne Goolagong (3) AUS Helen Gourlay Cawley ( ) AUS 6 3, 7 5
1972 Billie Jean King (3) USA Evonne Goolagong (1) AUS 6 3, 6 3
1973 Margaret Court (1) AUS Chris Evert (2) USA 6 7(5),7 6(6), 6 4
1974 Chris Evert (1) USA Olga Morozova (3) RUS 6 1, 6 2
1975 Chris Evert (1) USA Martina Navratilova (2) TCH 2 6, 6 2, 6 1
1976 (#18) Sue Barker (1) GBR (#47) Renata Tomanova ( ) TCH 6 2, 0 6, 6 2
1977 (#9) Mima Jausovec (1) YUG (#40) Florenza Mihai ( ) ROM 6 2, 6 7(5), 6 1
1978 (#17) Virginia Ruzici (2) ROM (#14) Mima Jausovec (1) YUG 6 2, 6 2
1979 (#1) Chris Evert Lloyd (1) USA (#6) Wendy Turnbull (4) AUS 6 2, 6 0
1980 (#3) Chris Evert Lloyd (1) USA (#13) Virginia Ruzici (8) ROM 6 0, 6 3
1981 (#5) Hana Mandlikova (4) TCH (#9) Sylvia Hanika (6) GER 6 2, 6 4
1982 (#2) Martina Navratilova (2) USA (#4) Andrea Jaeger (4) USA 7 6(6), 6 1
1983 (#2) Chris Evert Lloyd (2) USA (#38) Mima Jausovec ( ) YUG 6 1, 6 2
1984 (#1) Martina Navratilova (1) USA (#2) Chris Evert Lloyd (2) USA 6 3, 6 1
1985 (#2) Chris Evert Lloyd (2) USA (#1) Martina Navratilova (1) USA 6 3, 6 7(4), 7 5
1986 (#2) Chris Evert Lloyd (2) USA (#1) Martina Navratilova (1) USA 2 6, 6 3, 6 3
1987 (#2) Steffi Graf (2) GER (#1) Martina Navratilova (1) USA 6 4, 4 6, 8 6
1988 (#1) Steffi Graf (1) GER (#15) Natasha Zvereva (13) BLR 6 0, 6 0
1989 (#10) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (7) ESP (#1) Steffi Graf (1) GER 7 6(6), 3 6, 7 5
1990 (#3) Monica Seles (2) YUG (#1) Steffi Graf (1) GER 7 6(6), 6 4
1991 (#1) Monica Seles (1) YUG (#6) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (5) ESP 6 3, 6 4
1992 (#1) Monica Seles (1) YUG (#2) Steffi Graf (2) GER 6 2, 3 6, 10 8
1993 (#2) Steffi Graf (1) GER (#7) Mary Joe Fernandez (5) USA 4 6, 6 2, 6 4
1994 (#2) A Sanchez Vicario (2) ESP (#12) Mary Pierce (12) FRA 6 4, 6 4
1995 (#2) Steffi Graf (2) GER (#1) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (1) ESP 7 5, 4 6, 6 0
1996 (#1) Steffi Graf (Co 1s) GER (#3) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (4) ESP 6 3, 6 7(4), 10 8
1997 (#9) Iva Majoli (9) CRO (#1) Martina Hingis (1) SUI 6 4, 6 2
1998 (#5) Arantxa Sanchez Vicario (4) ESP (#8) Monica Seles (6) USA 7 6(5), 0 6, 6 2
1999 (#6) Steffi Graf (6) GER (#1) Martina Hingis (1) SUI 4 6, 7 5, 6 2
2000 (#7) Mary Pierce (6) FRA (#5) Conchita Martinez (5) ESP 6-2, 7-5
2001 (#4) Jennifer Capriati (4) USA (#14) Kim Clijsters (12) BEL 1-6, 6-4, 12-10
2002 (#3) Serena Williams (3) USA (#2) Venus Williams (2) USA 7-5, 6-3

* Computer Rankings for players began on November 1975


TENNIS ENTERS ITS THIRD CENTURY
(A LOOK AT THE WINNERS OF EVERY GRAND SLAM TOURNAMENT)
* Seeds are listed in parenthesis, from first year of introduction *

AUSTRALIAN ROLAND GARROS WIMBLEDON UNITED STATES
1884 M. Watson
1885 M. Watson
1886 B. Bingley
1887 C. Dod E. Hansell
1888 C. Dod B. Townsend
1889 B. Bingley-Hillyard B. Townsend

1890 L. Rice E. Roosevelt
1891 C. Dod M. Cahill IRL
1892 C. Dod M. Cahill IRL
1893 C. Dod A. Terry
1894 B. Hillyard H. Hellwig
1895 C. Cooper J. Atkinson
1896 C. Cooper E. Moore
1897 A. Masson B. Hillyard J. Atkinson
1898 A. Masson C. Cooper J. Atkinson
1899 A. Masson B. Hillyard M. Jones

1900 Y. Prèvost B. Hillyard M. McAteer
1901 P Girod C. Cooper-Sterry E. Moore
1902 A. Masson M. Robb M. Jones
1903 A. Masson D. Douglass E. Moore
1904 K. Gillou D. Douglass M. Sutton
1905 K. Gillou M. Sutton USA E. Moore
1906 K. Gillou-Fenwick D. Douglass H. Homans
1907 C. De Kemel M. Sutton USA E. Sears
1908 K. Fenwick C. Sterry M. Barger-Wallach
1909 J. Matthey D. Boothby H. Hotchkiss

1910 J. Matthey D. Lambert-Chambers H. Hotchkiss
1911 J. Matthey D. Lambert-Chambers H. Hotchkiss
1912 J. Matthey E. Larcombe M. Browne
1913 M. Broquedis D. Lambert-Chambers M. Browne
1914 M. Broquedis D. Lambert-Chambers M. Browne
1915 -- not held -- -- not held -- M. Bjurstedt NOR
1916 -- not held -- -- not held -- M. Bjurstedt NOR
1917 -- not held -- -- not held -- M. Bjurstedt NOR
1918 -- not held -- -- not held -- M. Bjurstedt NOR
1919 -- not held -- S. Lenglen FRA H. Hotchkiss-Wightman*

1920 S. Lenglen S. Lenglen FRA M. Bjurstedt-Mallory
1921 S. Lenglen S. Lenglen FRA M. Bjurstedt-Mallory
1922 M. Molesworth S. Lenglen S. Lenglen* FRA M. Bjurstedt-Mallory (1)
1923 M. Molesworth S. Lenglen S. Lenglen FRA H. Wills (2)
1924 S. Lance D. Vlasto K. McKane H. Wills (1)
1925 D. Akhurst S. Lenglen (1)* S. Lenglen FRA H. Wills (1)
1926 D. Akhurst (1) S. Lenglen (1) K. McKane-Godfrey M. Bjurstedt-Mallory (2)
1927 E. Boyd (1) K. Bouman (3) NED H. Wills (1) USA H. Wills (1)
1928 D. Akhurst (1) H. Wills (1) USA H. Wills (1) USA H. Wills (1)
1929 D. Akhurst (1) H. Wills (1) USA H. Wills (1) USA H. Wills (1)

1930 D. Akhurst-Cozens (1) H. Wills-Moody (1) USA H. Wills-Moody (1) USA B. Nuthall (1-f) GBR
1931 C. Buttsworth (2) C. Aussem (1) GER C. Aussem (1) GER H. Wills-Moody (1)
1932 C. Buttsworth (2) H. Wills-Moody (1) USA H. Wills-Moody (1) USA H. Jacobs (1)
1933 J. Hartigan (1) M. Scriven (unseed) GBR H. Wills-Moody (1) USA H. Jacobs (2)
1934 J. Hartigan (1) M. Scriven (2) GBR D. Round (2) H. Jacobs (1)
1935 D. Round (1) GBR H. Sperling (2) GER H. Wills-Moody (4) USA H. Jacobs (1)
1936 J. Hartigan (1) H. Sperling (1) GER H. Jacobs (2) USA A. Marble (3)
1937 N. Wynne-Bolton (2) H. Sperling (1) GER D. Round (7) A. Lizane (2-f) CHI
1938 D. Bundy (1) S. Mathieu (1) H. Wills-Moody (1) USA A. Marble (2)
1939 E. Westacott (6) S. Mathieu (1) A. Marble (1) USA A. Marble (1)

1940 N. Wynne-Bolton (1) -- not held -- -- not held -- A. Marble (1)
1941 -- not held -- -- not held -- -- not held -- S. Palfrey-Cooke (2)
1942 -- not held -- -- not held -- -- not held -- P. Betz (2)
1943 -- not held -- -- not held -- -- not held -- P. Betz (1)
1944 -- not held -- -- not held -- -- not held -- P. Betz (1)
1945 -- not held -- -- not held -- -- not held -- S. Palfrey-Cooke (2)
1946 N. Wynne-Bolton (1) M. Osbourne (2) USA P. Betz (1) USA P. Betz (1)
1947 N. Wynne-Bolton (1) P. Todd (5) USA M. Osbourne (1) USA L. Brough (2)
1948 N. Wynne-Bolton (1) N. Adamson-Landry (3) FRA L. Brough (2) USA M. Osbourne-DuPont (3)
1949 D. Hart (1) USA M. Osbourne-DuPont (1) USA L. Brough (1) USA M. Osbourne-DuPont (2)

1950 L. Brough (1) USA D. Hart (3) USA L. Brough (1) USA M. Osbourne-DuPont (1)
1951 N. Wynne-Bolton (1) S. Fry (3) USA D. Hart (3) USA M. Connolly (3)
1952 T. Coyne-Long (2) D. Hart (2) USA M. Connolly (2) USA M. Connolly (1)
1953 M. Connolly (1) USA M. Connolly (1) USA M. Connolly (1) USA M. Connolly (1)
1954 T. Long (1) M. Connolly (1) USA M. Connolly (1) USA D. Hart (2)
1955 B. Penrose (2) A. Mortimer (2) GBR L. Brough (2) USA D. Hart (1)
1956 M. Carter (2) A. Gibson (3) USA S. Fry (5) USA S. Fry (1)
1957 S. Fry (1) USA S. Bloomer (1) GBR A. Gibson (1) USA A. Gibson (1)
1958 A. Mortimer (1) GBR Z. Kormoczy (3) HUN A. Gibson (1) USA A. Gibson (1)
1959 M. Carter-Reitano (4) C. Truman (2) GBR M. Bueno (6) BRA M. Bueno (1) BRA

1960 M. Smith (7) D. Hard (6) USA M. Bueno (1) BRA D. Hard (3)
1961 M. Smith (1) A. Haydon (6) GBR A. Mortimer (7) D. Hard (1)
1962 M. Smith (1) M. Smith (1) AUS K. Hantze-Susman (8) USA M. Smith (1) AUS
1963 M. Smith (1) L. Turner (2) AUS M. Smith (1) AUS M. Bueno (2) BRA
1964 M. Smith (1) M. Smith (1) AUS M. Bueno (2) BRA M. Bueno (1) BRA
1965 M. Smith (1) L. Turner (3) AUS M. Smith (2) AUS M. Smith (1) AUS
1966 M. Smith (1) A. Haydon-Jones (3) GBR BJ. King (4) USA M. Bueno (2) BRA
1967 N. Richey (1) USA F. Durr (6) BJ. King (1) USA BJ. King (1)
1968 BJ. King (1) USA
OPEN ERA: N. Richey (2) USA BJ. King (1) USA V. Wade (6) GBR
1969 M. Court (2) M. Court (1) AUS A. Jones (4) M. Court (2) AUS

1970 M. Court (1) M. Court (2) AUS M. Court (1) AUS M. Court (1) AUS
1971 M. Court (1) E. Goolagong (3) AUS E. Goolagong (2) AUS BJ. King (1)
1972 V. Wade (2) GBR BJ. King (3) USA BJ. King (2) USA BJ. King (1)
1973 M. Court (1) M. Court (1) AUS BJ. King (2) USA M. Court (1) AUS
1974 E. Goolagong (2) C. Evert (1) USA C. Evert (2) USA BJ. King (2)
1975 E. Goolagong (3) C. Evert (1) USA BJ. King (3) USA C. Evert (1)
1976 E. Goolagong-Cawley (1) S. Barker (1) GBR C. Evert (1) USA C. Evert (1)
1977J K. Melville-Reid (2) M. Jausovec (1) YUG V. Wade (3) C. Evert (1)
1977D E. Goolagong-Cawley (1)
1978 C. O'Neil (unseed) V. Ruzici (2) ROM M. Navratilova (2) TCH C. Evert (2)
1979 B. Jordan (5) USA C. Evert-Lloyd (1) USA M. Navratilova (1) TCH T. Austin (3)

1980 H. Mandlikova (3) TCH C. Evert-Lloyd (1) USA E. Goolagong-Cawley (4) AUS C. Evert-Lloyd (3)
1981 M. Navratilova (3) USA H. Mandlikova (4) TCH C. Evert-Lloyd (1) USA T. Austin (3)
1982 C. Evert-Lloyd (2) USA M. Navratilova (2) USA M. Navratilova (1) USA C. Evert-Lloyd (2)
1983 M. Navratilova (1) USA C. Evert-Lloyd (2) USA M. Navratilova (1) USA M. Navratilova (1)
1984 C. Evert-Lloyd (2) USA M. Navratilova (1) USA M. Navratilova (1) USA M. Navratilova (1)
1985 M. Navratilova (2) USA C. Evert-Lloyd (2) USA M. Navratilova (co-1) USA H. Mandlikova (3) TCH
1986 - not held - C. Evert-Lloyd (2) USA M. Navratilova (1) USA M. Navratilova (1)
1987 H. Mandlikova (2) TCH S. Graf (2) GER M. Navratilova (1) USA M. Navratilova (2)
1988 S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER
1989 S. Graf (1) GER A. Sanchez (7) ESP S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf(1) GER

1990 S. Graf (1) GER M. Seles (3) YUG M. Navratilova (2) USA G. Sabatini (5) ARG
1991 M. Seles (2) YUG M. Seles (1) YUG S. Graf (1) GER M. Seles (2) YUG
1992 M. Seles (1) YUG M. Seles (1) YUG S. Graf (2) GER M. Seles (1) YUG
1993 M. Seles (1) YUG S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER
1994 S. Graf (1) GER A. Sánchez-Vicario(2) ESP C. Martinez (3) ESP A. Sánchez-Vicario(2) ESP
1995 M. Pierce (4) FRA S. Graf (2) GER S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER
1996 M. Seles (1) USA S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER S. Graf (1) GER
1997 M. Hingis (4) SUI I. Majoli (9) CRO M. Hingis (1) SUI M. Hingis (1) SUI
1998 M. Hingis (1) SUI A. Sánchez-Vicario(4) ESP J. Novotna (3) CZE L. Davenport (2)
1999 M. Hingis (2) SUI S. Graf (6) GER L. Davenport (2) USA S. Williams (7)
2000 L. Davenport (2) USA M. Pierce (6) V. Williams (5) USA V. Williams (3)

2001 J. Capriati (12) USA J. Capriati (4) USA V. Williams (2) USA V. Williams (3)
2002 J. Capriati (1) USA S. Williams (3) USA S. Williams (2) USA S. Williams (1)
2003 S. Williams (1) USA K. Clijsters (2) or J.Henin-Hardenne (4) BEL

* Prior to 1925, participation * Prior to 1921, tournament * Prior to 1919, tournament
restricted to French residents was played as a Challenge was played as a Challenge
Round Round

Titles-By-Seed Titles-By-Seed Titles-By-Seed Titles-By-Seed
No.1 45 No.1 31 No.1 36 No.1 47
No.2 17 No.2 16 No.2 17 No.2 21
No.3 3 No.3 12 No.3 6 No.3 10
No.4 3 No.4 3 No.4 6 No.4 0

No.5 1 No.5 2 No.5 3 No.5 1
No.6 1 No.6 5 No.6 1 No.6 1
No.7 1 No.7 1 No.7 2 No.7 1
No.12 1 No.9 1 No.8 1
Non-Seed 1
TOP OF PAGE


 

2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY 12 MEN’S NOTES
Friday 6 June 2003
Semifinals



Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 7 Guillermo Coria (ARG) v Martin Verkerk (NED)

No. 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) v No. 9 Albert Costa (ESP)



Champions Race Update
Below are the updated ATP Champions Race standings through the 2003 Roland Garros semifinals. Andre Agassi’s position at the top is in danger today – if No. 3 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero wins his match to reach the final, he will move ahead of the American. If Coria advances to the final, he will be just one point behind the American and would overtake him too by winning the whole tournament. Therefore there is a chance that, at the end of Roland Garros, Agassi will be pushed down into third place.

Martin Verkerk has already jumped into the top 20 during the tournament, climbing 17 places to No. 13 currently. A win for today for the Dutchman could see him go as high as joint-8th place. If Costa wins, he will go up to No. 7 on the ATP Champions Race.

Current
Position Position at
26 May
Player
Points as of 26 May Roland Garros
Points*
Total
1. 1. Andre Agassi 372 50 422
2. 3. Juan Carlos Ferrero 307 90 397
3. 5. Guillermo Coria 281 90 371
4. 6. Carlos Moya 269 50 319
5. 4. Rainer Schuettler 288 30 318
6. 2. Roger Federer 311 1 312
7. 7. Andy Roddick 235 1 236
8. 9. Felix Mantilla 204 30 234
9. 10. Gustavo Kuerten 188 30 218
10. 8. Agustin Calleri 214 1 215
11. 22. Albert Costa 111 90 201
12. 11. Lleyton Hewitt 181 15 196
13. T30. Martin Verkerk 94 90 184
14. 12. Wayne Ferreira 157 15 172
15. 20. Tommy Robredo 113 50 163
16. 13. Gaston Gaudio 142 15 157
17. 14. Vince Spadea 138 15 153
18. 17. Younes El Aynaoui 136 15 151
T19. T15. Nikolay Davydenko 137 7 144
T19. T15. Yevgeny Kafelnikov 137 7 144
* - points earned through the semifinals

Kings of Clay update
Looking at the updated top 10 clay court match winners for 2003, two of the 2003 Roland Garros semifinalists have built on their already impressive clay court records this season, with the potential to go higher. Ferrero is currently in third place for most wins on the surface so far this year; Coria in fifth place.

2003 Kings of Clay (through quarterfinals)
Rank Player Win-Loss
1 Gaston Gaudio (ARG) 28-10
2. Carlos Moya (ESP) 27-7
3. Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) 26-2
4. Agustin Calleri (ARG) 24-9
5. Guillermo Coria (ARG) 23-4
6. Felix Mantilla (ESP) 18-7
7. Nikolay Davydenko (RUS) 17-10
8. Fernando Gonzalez (CHI) 16-6
9. Tommy Robredo (ESP) 15-6
10. Jarkko Nieminen (FIN) 15-7
Players in bold still active at 2003 Roland Garros






COURT PHILIPPE CHATRIER

NO. 7 GUILLERMO CORIA (ARG) v MARTIN VERKERK (NED)

Head-to-head: first meeting
This the first meeting for Coria and Verkerk, who are both playing their first Grand Slam semifinal. It is the eighth meeting between an Argentine and a Dutchman at Roland Garros in the Open Era, and the furthest into any Grand Slam tournament that the two nations have met.

Coria has only played one other Dutchman at tour level, defeating Rogier Wassen 64 61 in the first round at 2001 Mallorca.

Today will be Verkerk’s fourth career meeting with an Argentine, and he has a 1-2 record in previous matches. He defeated Sebastian Prieto 63 36 63 in the first round at 2002 Amersfoort, then lost to Mariano Zabaleta 64 64 in the second round at 2003 Adelaide and lost to Juan Ignacio Chela 67 63 64 in the first round at 2003 TMS Miami.

Coria v Verkerk

21 Age 24
7 Entry Ranking 46
2 Titles 1
14-7 Career Grand Slam Record 5-2
Semifinalist
2003 Roland Garros Best Grand Slam Result Semifinalist
2003 Roland Garros
8-3 Roland Garros Record 5-0
83-44 Career Record 27-28
57-25 Career Record – Clay 15-11
32-9 2003 Record 19-14
23-4 2003 Record – Clay 11-6
1-1 Career Five-Set Record 2-0
0 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
24-17 Career Tie-break Record 10-11
7-3 2003 Tie-break Record 8-8
14:04 Total Time on Court 13:17

Road to the Semifinals
Coria Time Time Verkerk
d. Andre Sa 63 61 61 1:40 1st Round 1:39 d. Zeljko Krajan 63 64 64
d. Nicolas Kiefer 63 57 63 61 3:10 2nd Round 2:49 d. Luis Horna 46 64 46 75 62
d. (Q) Attila Savolt 64 61 61 2:00 3rd Round 2:56 d. No. 29 Vince Spadea 57 64 62 75
d. Mariano Zabaleta 64 76 57 67 63 4:42 Round of 16 2:01 d. No. 11 Rainer Schuettler 63 63 75
d. No. 2 Andre Agassi 46 63 62 64 2:32 Quarterfinals 3:52 d. No. 4 Carlos Moya 63 64 57 46 86


• Playing his first Grand Slam quarterfinal, Coria handed 1999 champion Andre Agassi his third straight Roland Garros quarterfinal exit, winning 46 63 62 64 to advance to the semis and avenging his loss to Agassi by retirement in the round of 16 at the 2003 Australian Open.

• In the round of 16, Coria’s 64 76 57 67 63 defeat of countryman Mariano Zabaleta was the longest match of the tournament so far and the first five-set victory of Coria’s career. (That match was played over two days: Coria led by two sets to one when play was stopped after 2 hours 48 minutes due to bad light on Sunday night. It was finished on Monday after a further 1 hour 54 minutes.)

• Before this tournament, Coria had his best Grand Slam finish at the 2003 Australian Open, where he advanced to the round of 16. He defeated countryman Guillermo Canas 62 46 64 64 in the second round and Jarkko Nieminen 75 62 62 in the third round before retiring from his round of 16 match against Andre Agassi trailing 16 13 in the second set because of calluses and blisters on his right foot.

• Coria is the 5th different Argentine man in the Open Era to reach the semifinals of a Grand Slam tournament. Until David Nalbandian at 2002 Wimbledon, all of Coria’s predecessors had reached their first major semifinal at Roland Garros.

• Coria is bidding to become just the third Argentine to reach a Grand Slam final. Guillermo Vilas – after whom Coria is named - appeared in eight Grand Slam finals, winning four titles. David Nalbandian became the second man from his country to reach a Grand Slam final at 2002 Wimbledon.

Argentines in Grand Slam semifinals (Open Era)
Event Player Final Outcome
1975 Roland Garros Guillermo Vilas Runner-up
1975 US Open Guillermo Vilas Lost in SFs
1976 US Open Guillermo Vilas Lost in SFs
1977 Australian Open (Jan) Guillermo Vilas Runner-up
1977 Roland Garros Guillermo Vilas Champion
1977 US Open Guillermo Vilas Champion
1978 Australian Open Guillermo Vilas Champion
1978 Roland Garros Guillermo Vilas Runner-up
1979 Australian Open Guillermo Vilas Champion
1980 Australian Open Guillermo Vilas Lost in SFs
1981 Roland Garros Jose Luis Clerc Lost in SFs
1982 Roland Garros Jose Luis Clerc
Guillermo Vilas Lost in SFs
Runner-up
1982 US Open Guillermo Vilas Lost in SFs
2000 Roland Garros Franco Squillari Lost in SFs
2002 Wimbledon David Nalbandian Runner-up
2003 Roland Garros Guillermo Coria ???

• Coria, at 21 years 4 months 24 days, is the youngest player remaining through to the Roland Garros semifinals.

• If he wins today, Coria will face either Juan Carlos Ferrero or Albert Costa in the final. He trails Ferrero 0-2 in their head-to-head, and has a 2-2 record against Costa.

• This is Coria’s fourth appearance at Roland Garros. Before now, his best result here was last year, when he reached the third round before losing to eventual runner-up Juan Carlos Ferrero 62 63 63.

• Coria is playing his eighth Grand Slam overall and at No. 7 receives his highest seeding. He received a Grand Slam seeding once before, at 2001 Wimbledon, where he was No. 29.

• Coria has won 19 of his last 22 matches, going back to the start of his spring clay court season. He is currently on an 11-match winning streak, having won TMS Hamburg. Coria was due to play at St Polten a week before Roland Garros but withdrew before the start with a groin injury.

• This has been the best season of Coria’s career. The 21-year-old reached a career-high Entry Ranking of No. 7 on 19 May, thanks to his victory at TMS Hamburg, where he defeated Gaston Gaudio 63 67 60 in the semifinals and Agustin Calleri 63 64 64 in the final. Coria also reached finals on clay at TMS Monte Carlo (losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero 62 62) and at Buenos Aires (losing to Carlos Moya 63 46 64).

• Coria’s title at TMS Hamburg was the second of his career. He also won on clay at Vina Del Mar in 2001, defeating Gaston Gaudio 46 62 75 in the final.

• Coria was Roland Garros junior champion in 1999, defeating David Nalbandian 64 63 in the boys’ final. As one of seven former junior champions who entered Roland Garros this year, he is attempting to become the first to capture the men’s singles title since 1981 junior champ Mats Wilander won his third men’s singles title here in 1988.

From Boys to Men at Roland Garros
Junior Champion Men’s Champion
Ken Rosewall 1952 1953 and 1968
Roy Emerson 1954 1963 and 1967
Andres Gimeno 1955 1972
Mats Wilander 1981 1982, 1985 and 1988
Ivan Lendl 1978 1984, 1986 and 1987


• Verkerk’s path to the semifinals at 2003 Roland Garros has been dotted with personal achievements. He won his first Grand Slam tournament match when he defeated Zeljko Krajan of Croatia 63 64 64 in the first round. He played and won the first five-set match of his career when he defeated Luis Horna 46 64 46 75 62 in the second round. He then defeated No. 29 seed Vince Spadea 57 64 62 75 in the third round, No. 11 Rainer Schuettler 63 63 75 in the fourth round and 1998 champion and No. 4 seed Carlos Moya 63 64 57 46 86 in the quarterfinals.

• Verkerk’s defeat of Moya in the quarterfinals was his first victory against a Top 5 player. The highest-ranked player Verkerk had defeated previously in his career (encompassing only 28 events, not including Davis Cup, but including 2003 Roland Garros) was Andy Roddick, who was No. 6 when Verkerk beat him 67 63 64 in the second round of TMS Rome. (Verkerk advanced past then-No. 5 Tim Henman by walkover in the round of 16 at 2002 Indianapolis, but walkovers do not count toward win-loss records.)

• If he wins today, Verkerk will face either Juan Carlos Ferrero or Albert Costa in the final. He trails Ferrero 0-1 and also Costa 0-1 in their previous meetings.

• Verkerk has advanced to the semifinals of a major in only his third appearance in a Grand Slam event, becoming the 10th man in the Open Era to reach a Grand Slam semifinal within three Open Era Grand Slam appearances. Of these players, 5 were able to convert their first Open Era Grand Slam semifinal into their first Open Era Grand Slam final, and three – Gustavo Kuerten, Mark Edmondson and Mats Wilander, both at Roland Garros – won the title.
Three attempts or less to reach first Grand Slam semifinal

Player
Event Grand Slam events played Result in first semifinal Eventual
finish
Martin Verkerk 2003 Roland Garros 3 ??? ???
Juan Carlos Ferrero 2000 Roland Garros 3 Lost to Gustavo Kuerten 75 46 26 64 63 SF
Gustavo Kuerten 1997 Roland Garros 3 Defeated Filip de Wulf 61 36 61 76 Won title
Andrei Medvedev 1993 Roland Garros 3 Lost to Sergi Bruguera 60 64 62 SF
Mikael Pernfors 1986 Roland Garros 3 Defeated Henri Leconte 26 75 76 63 Runner-up
Mats Wilander 1982 Roland Garros 3 Defeated Jose Luis Clerc 75 62 16 75 Won title
Steve Denton 1981 Australian Open 3 Defeated Hank Pfister 76 67 61 36 63 Runner-up
Mark Edmondson 1976 Australian Open 3 Defeated Ken Rosewall 61 26 62 64 Won title

Patrick McEnroe 1991 Australian Open 2 Lost to Boris Becker 67 64 61 64 SF
John McEnroe 1977 Wimbledon 2 Lost to Jimmy Connors 63 63 46 64 SF

• This is Verkerk’s first appearance at Roland Garros. The last player to reach the semifinals on his Roland Garros debut was Juan Carlos Ferrero in 2000. Only five players in the Open Era, including Ferrero, have advanced to the semifinals at Roland Garros in their first time playing the event. From here, two men have gone on to the final in their Roland Garros debut, with Mats Wilander winning the championship in 1982.

First Roland Garros, First Semifinal
Year Player SF Result Final Outcome
1979 Vitas Gerulaitis lost to Bjorn Borg 62 61 60 Semifinalist
1982 Mats Wilander defeated Jose-Luis Clerc 75 62 16 75 Champion
1986 Mikael Pernfors defeated Henri Leconte 26 75 76 63 Runner-up
2000 Juan Carlos Ferrero lost to Gustavo Kuerten 75 46 26 64 63 Semifinalist
2003 Martin Verkerk vs. Guillermo Coria ???

• Verkerk is the third different Dutchman to reach the Roland Garros semifinals in the Open Era, joining Tom Okker (1969) and Richard Krajicek (1993).

• Okker and Krajicek were the only Dutchmen to reach the semifinals at any Grand Slam tournament until last year’s US Open, when they were joined by Sjeng Schalken and, now, Martin Verkerk.

Dutchmen in Grand Slam semifinals (Open Era)
Event Player Final Outcome
1968 US Open Tom Okker Runner-up
1969 Roland Garros Tom Okker lost in semifinals
1971 Australian Open Tom Okker lost in semifinals
1971 US Open Tom Okker lost in semifinals
1978 Wimbledon Tom Okker lost in semifinals
1992 Australian Open Richard Krajicek lost in semifinals
1993 Roland Garros Richard Krajicek lost in semifinals
1996 Wimbledon Richard Krajicek Champion
1998 Wimbledon Richard Krajicek lost in semifinals
2002 US Open Sjeng Schalken lost in semifinals
2003 Roland Garros Martin Verkerk ???

• Verkerk is the first unseeded player to reach the semifinals at Roland Garros since Franco Squillari in 2000. In the Open Era, Roland Garros has seen seven unseeded finalists, of which two went on to become unseeded champions: Mats Wilander in 1982 and Gustavo Kuerten in 1997.

• Prior to 2003 Roland Garros, Verkerk had played two Grand Slam events and lost in the first round of both. As a qualifier at the 2002 US Open, he fell to Andy Roddick 76 63 64. At this year’s Australian Open, he fell to Mark Philippoussis 64 64 67 63.

• Verkerk attempted to qualify for last year’s Roland Garros, and got to the third and final round of the qualifying tournament before losing in three sets to Frenchman Eric Prodon 57 63 63.

• Verkerk came into Roland Garros with a career-best Entry Ranking of No. 46. Having climbed 84 places last year, he continued his improvement into this season. He won his first singles title at Milan in February, defeating Ivan Ljubicic 36 75 76 in the semifinals and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 57 75 in the final, and performed well in the latter half of the European clay court season. Said Verkerk after winning on indoor carpet at Milan: “Before, I was saying that clay was my best surface, but it would be stupid to say it now.”

• Verkerk has now won 11 of his last 13 matches. He reached the semifinals last week at St Polten, falling to Nikolay Davydenko 75 61, and before that the quarters at TMS Rome, where Kafelnikov took revenge for Milan, defeating Verkerk 63 75.


NO. 3 JUAN CARLOS FERRERO (ESP) v NO. 9 ALBERT COSTA (ESP)

Head-to-head: Costa leads 3-2
1999 Kitzbuhel Clay (O) QF Costa 36 62 63
2001 Barcelona Clay (O) R16 Ferrero 64 36 63
2001 TMS Hamburg Clay (O) SF Ferrero 61 62
2002 TMS Hamburg Clay (O) R64 Costa 26 63 64
2002 Roland Garros Clay (O) FR Costa 61 60 46 63

Ferrero v Costa

23 Age 27
3 Entry Ranking 9
9 Titles 12
38-12 Career Grand Slam Record 46-27
Runner-up
2002 Roland Garros Best Grand Slam Result Champion
2002 Roland Garros
21-3 Roland Garros Record 28-8
205-87 Career Record 346-221
119-27 Career Record – Clay 245-108
38-7 2003 Record 20-11
26-2 2003 Record – Clay 12-5
11-8 Career Five-Set Record 9-12
1 Comebacks from 0-2 down 3
68-59 Career Tie-break Record 97-88
6-6 2003 Tie-break Record 6-7
11:08 Total Time on Court 18:31

Road to the Semifinals
Ferrero Time Time Costa
d. Michel Kratochvil 75 75 64 2:23 1st Round 3:38 d. (LL) Sergio Roitman 67 26 75 62 62
d. Nicolas Massu 62 30 ret.* 0:43 2nd Round 3:40 d. Radek Stepanek 63 57 64 36 64
d. No. 25 Tim Henman 46 62 64 62 2:50 3rd Round 4:38 d. Nicolas Lapentti 46 46 63 64 64
d. No. 20 Felix Mantilla 62 61 61 1:40 Round of 16 3:07 d. No. 32 Arnaud Clement 62 75 75
d. No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez
61 36 61 57 64 3:32 Quarterfinals 3:28 d. No. 28 Tommy Robredo
26 36 64 75 62
* Massu had a left ankle injury, having sprained it in his previous match

This is the fifth all-Spanish match-up of the tournament, tying the record for the most all-Spanish clashes in a single Grand Slam event in the Open Era, set here in 1998. The five all-Spanish matches at 1998 Roland Garros led to what became the second all-Spanish final of the Open Era. The third all-Spanish final was, of course, between Costa and Ferrero here last year.

There have been two previous meetings between Spaniards in a Grand Slam tournament semifinal, both occurring at Roland Garros and both in the last five years. In 1998, Carlos Moya defeated Felix Mantilla 57 62 64 62 in the semis en route to the title; in 2002, Costa defeated Alex Corretja 63 64 36 63, and also went on to win the title.

Ferrero had his seventh straight victory over Felix Mantilla in the round of 16, improving his career win-loss record against his countryman to 42-14. He is currently on an 11-match winning streak that began with his 63 16 76 victory against Carlos Moya at 2002 Hong Kong last September.

Ferrero on a Spanish roll
Event Result Score
2002 Hong Kong Defeated Carlos Moya 63 16 76 in the final
2002 TMS Madrid Defeated Alex Corretja 36 60 61 in R16
2002 Basle Defeated Felix Mantilla 26 63 76 in QFs
2002 Tennis Masters Cup Defeated Carlos Moya 67 64 64 in SFs
2003 TMS Miami Defeated Fernando Vicente 62 62 in 2nd rd
2003 TMS Monte Carlo Defeated Felix Mantilla 36 62 75 in 2nd rd
2003 TMS Monte Carlo Defeated Alberto Martin 60 62 in QFs
2003 Valencia Defeated Guillermo Garcia-Lopez 64 64 in 1st rd
2003 Valencia Defeated Albert Portas 64 64 in R16
2003 TMS Rome Defeated Alex Corretja 64 64 in 2nd rd
2003 Roland Garros Defeated Felix Mantilla 62 61 61 in R16

Of the Spaniards who have played Ferrero more than once, only his opponent today, Costa, has a winning record against him: Costa is 3-2 against Ferrero, as described above.

In contrast to Ferrero’s 11-match winning streak against his countrymen, Costa was on a five-match losing streak against Spaniards until his semifinal defeat of Tommy Robredo on Wednesday. (His career win-loss against Spaniards is 63-39.) Before beating Robredo, he had not beaten a Spaniard since he win over Ferrero in the Roland Garros final last year.
Roland Garros stops Costa’s national slide
Event Player Result
2002 Kitzbuhel Alex Corretja Lost 61 62 in QF
2002 Tennis Masters Cup Carlos Moya Lost 76 36 64 in RR
2003 Australian Open Felix Mantilla Lost 36 63 46 61 63 in 3rd rd
2003 TMS Monte Carlo Rafael Nadal Lost 75 63 in 2nd rd
2003 TMS Rome Felix Mantilla Lost 75 46 61 in R16
2003 Roland Garros Tommy Robredo Won 26 36 64 75 62 in QFs

Both Ferrero and Costa were junior boys' runners-up at Roland Garros. For Costa this was back in 1993, when he lost in the final to fellow Spaniard Roberto Carretero 60 76, while Ferrero lost the 1998 boys' final to Fernando Gonzalez 46 64 63. The last former junior runner-up to go on to win the men's title at Roland Garros was Thomas Muster, who claimed the senior title in 1995, ten years after finishing runner-up to Jaime Yzaga in the junior boys' competition. (The last former junior champion to win the men's title was Mats Wilander in 1988 and, this year, Guillermo Coria could be in line to repeat this feat.)


• With his 61 36 61 57 64 defeat of Fernando Gonzalez in the quarterfinals, Ferrero avenged his defeat in the 1998 Roland Garros boys’ final and two further defeats by the Chilean as a professional.

• His defeat of Gonzalez was Ferrero’s first five-setter of the tournament and improved his five-set record to 11-8. His five-set record at Roland Garros is 4-1, his only loss being to Gustavo Kuerten 75 46 26 64 63 on his first semifinal appearance in 2000.

• Ferrero is playing Roland Garros for the fourth time and has advanced to his fourth consecutive Roland Garros semifinal. He joins four other men who have achieved this feat in the Open Era. Seven men have reached three consecutive semifinals or more, and of these, only Ferrero and Andre Agassi (who appeared in three consecutive semis 1990-92) have appeared in so many consecutive Roland Garros semifinals without winning the tournament at least one year during the streak. (Agassi did go on to win the title in 1999.)

Most consecutive Roland Garros semifinals
Player Consecutive Semifinals Finals* Titles^
Bjorn Borg 4 (1978-79-80-81) 4 4
Mats Wilander 4 (1982-83-84-85) 3 2
Ivan Lendl 4 (1984-85-86-87) 4 3
Jim Courier 4 (1991-92-93-94) 3 2
Juan Carlos Ferrero 4 (2000-01-02) 1 0
Andre Agassi 3 (1990-91-92) 2 0
Sergi Bruguera 3 (1993-94-95) 2 2
* - does not include all career finals, only those from three or more consecutive semifinals
^ - does not include all career titles, only those from three or more consecutive semifinals

• Ferrero advanced to the final last year, defeating No. 4 seed Andre Agassi 63 57 75 63 in the quarterfinals and No. 2 seed Marat Safin 63 62 64 in the semifinals. Costa stopped Ferrero from winning his first Grand Slam tournament title by winning 61 60 46 63 in the final.

• Ferrero says he feels in much better shape than during 2002 Roland Garros. Last year, he sprained his ankle in practise before his second round match, and was unsure for a time that he would be able to continue in the tournament. He recovered enough to carry on, but after losing the final said: “I made a lot of mistakes, maybe because I had some problems with my body. I felt some pain in my legs, abductor, and also my abdominal. I tried all the time to play well in the final, but in the first two sets I couldn't play because I felt so much pain.”

• If he goes on to the final for a second consecutive year, Ferrero will face either No. 7 seed Guillermo Coria or Martin Verkerk. He has a winning record against both men: 2-0 against Coria, 1-0 against Verkerk.

• Ferrero trails Costa 2-3 in career meetings. He is one of just 12 men who have a meaningful winning record against Ferrero, meaningful being considered to be more than 1-0.

Players with a winning record vs Ferrero*
Player Win-loss
Younes El Aynaoui 5-0
Marat Safin 4-3
Richard Krajicek 3-0
Greg Rusedski 3-0
Albert Costa 3-2
Lleyton Hewitt 3-2
Fernando Gonzalez 2-1
Ivan Ljubicic 2-0
Raemon Sluiter 2-0
Magnus Gustafsson 2-1
Yevgeny Kafelnikov 2-1
Adrian Voinea 2-1
* not including 1-0 records

• Ferrero won the first 12 clay court matches he played this year, including the title at TMS Monte Carlo, where he defeated Guillermo Coria 62 62 in the final. Marat Safin ended Ferrero’s streak in the semifinals of Barcelona, winning 64 63. Ferrero then started a nine-match winning streak, also on clay, including the title at Valencia, before retiring from his semifinal match against Roger Federer at TMS Rome because of tendonitis in his right shoulder.

• Even though Ferrero began 2002 battling injury (he missed the 2002 Australian Open because of a knee injury), his year thus far has been remarkably better. He entered Roland Garros having won more than twice as many matches (33-7 in 2003 vs. 15-11 in 2002). In fact, his 33 match wins to the start of the tournament are almost 70 percent of his total match victories (48) for 2002.

• Ferrero had some good results on hard court at the start of the season, reaching the final at Sydney (losing to Hyung-Taik Lee 46 76 76) and a week later reaching the quarters at Australian Open (losing to Wayne Ferreira 76 76 61).


• Costa won his fourth five-set match at 2003 Roland Garros and came back from two-sets-to-love down for the third time this tournament when he defeated No. 28 seed Tommy Robredo 26 36 64 75 62 in the quarterfinals. In doing so, he added to his list of five-set achievements at this event.

• Costa is now the second man to come back from 0-2 down twice in a single Grand Slam tournament, matching the feats of Nicolas Escude at the 1998 Australian Open. Nicolas Escude and Costa staged their comebacks in exactly the same rounds. However, unlike Escude, whose comebacks were his only five-setters, Costa has a further five-set match to his credit here.

• Furthermore, with his defeat of Robredo, Costa became the fifth man in Open Era history to win four five-set matches during one tournament (including all events in which five sets are played) and the first to manage this feat at Roland Garros. No-one has won more than four five-set matches in one tournament.

• No player has gone on to win the title after playing four five-set matches in that tournament - the closest anyone has got was Steve Denton, who won four five-set matches en route to a runner-up finish at the 1981 Australian Open.

• Costa did not have a particularly impressive five-set record on entering 2003 Roland Garros, having won five of 17 matches played over the distance. In 28 previous majors, Costa had never previously won so much as two consecutive five set matches.

• Costa had also never come back from 0-2 down before this tournament. In the first round, he defeated lucky loser Sergio Roitman 67 26 75 62 62, thus avoiding becoming the first Roland Garros defending champion to lose in the opening round. (Roitman had led 4-1 in the third set.)

• Here, Costa has had his first five-set match wins since last year’s Roland Garros. After defeating Guillermo Canas 75 36 67 64 60 in the 2002 Roland Garros quarterfinals, Costa had gone out at each of the two subsequent Grand Slam tournaments he had played – the 2002 US Open and the 2003 Australian Open – in five sets. He lost in the second round at Flushing Meadows to Wayne Ferreira 16 67 64 75 64, and in the third round in Melbourne to Felix Mantilla 36 63 46 61 63. (Costa did not to play 2002 Wimbledon because he was on his honeymoon.)

• Costa has already been on court for just over 4 and a half hours longer than he was to this point in the tournament last year. En route to the semifinals last year, he had played a total of 13 hours 57 minutes, with his longest match having been a 75 36 67 64 60 victory against Guillermo Canas in 3 hours 54 minutes in the quarterfinals. Costa’s longest match this year was his third round victory against Nicolas Lapentti, which took 4 hours, 38 minutes. (Costa’s total time on court in winning the title last year was 19 hours, 17 minutes.)

• Costa has won the third-highest number of clay court matches of any active player. Spanish men occupy the top five spots on the all-time list for match wins on the surface by active players.
Clay court match win leaders (active players)*
Rank Player Clay court
win-loss record
1. Alex Corretja 284-130
2. Francisco Clavet 265-194
3. Albert Costa 245-108
4. Carlos Moya 220-85
5. Felix Mantilla 207-96
6. Marcelo Rios 179-81
7. Andrea Gaudenzi 166-32
8. Fernando Meligeni 162-132
9 Gustavo Kuerten 160-57
10. Andre Agassi 146-51
* through the 2003 Roland Garros quarterfinals

• Although Costa is behind compatriots Alex Corretja and Francisco Clavet for career clay court match wins, his 12 clay court titles are second only to Gustavo Kuerten – who has 13 titles – amongst active players.

• Costa is in line to become only the seventh man to successfully defend his Roland Garros title. In the Open Era, six players have successfully defended their Roland Garros crown on a total of nine occasions. Gustavo Kuerten, in 2001, was the last player to successfully defend his title. Coincidentally, Kuerten’s 17-match winning streak at Roland Garros was ended last year by Costa 64 75 64 in the round of 16. The full list of Open Era title defences can be found on pages 1-2 of the tournament Preview.

• Roland Garros is the only Grand Slam event Albert Costa has been able to progress beyond the quarterfinals. His second-best major is the Australian Open, where he reached the quarters in 1997. At the US Open, he advanced to the round of 16 in 2001. He has only won two of six matches played at Wimbledon.

• At the beginning of the tournament, Costa was among six former Roland Garros champions in the draw and is the last one standing. The others were Andre Agassi, Michael Chang, Yevgeny Kafelnikov, Gustavo Kuerten and Carlos Moya,

• Having won 2002 Roland Garros to end a run of 65 tournaments without a title (dating back to 1999 Kitzbuhel), Costa has since gone another 22 tournaments without success.

• Costa is playing his 10th consecutive Roland Garros. En route to his first Grand Slam title here last year, he defeated two fellow Spaniards: good friend Alex Corretja 63 64 36 63 in the semifinals and Juan Carlos Ferrero 61 60 46 63 in the final.

• By winning five matches thus far, Costa has won his most matches consecutively since here last year. His best in the intervening period have been reaching the final on clay at Amersfoort in July 2002 (losing to Juan Ignacio Chela 61 76) and the semifinals on hard court at TMS Miami in March 2003. At Miami, Costa defeated Roger Federer 76 46 76 in the quarterfinals then lost in the semifinals to Andre Agassi 62 64.

• Costa played five European clay court tournaments in preparation for this year’s Roland Garros, and had his best results at TMS Rome, where he reached the third round before losing to eventual champion Felix Mantilla 75 46 61, and at Barcelona, where he lost in the third round to Agustin Calleri 64 62.
TOP OF PAGE


ROLAND GARROS
MEN’S REVIEW
Day 10 Special Edition – 4 June 2003


Costa wins a record-tying fourth five-set match

The five-set victories keep on coming for defending champion Albert Costa, who advanced to the 2003 Roland Garros semifinals on Wednesday with a 26 36 64 75 62 defeat of No. 28 seed Tommy Robredo.

Costa becomes the fifth man in Open Era history to win four five-set matches during one tournament (including all events in which five sets are played) and the first to manage this feat at Roland Garros. There have been 12 occasions on which men have played four five-setters in a single tournament – but seven times they lost their fourth five-set match. (Nicolas Lapentti has played four five-setters in a single Slam twice.)

No player has gone on to win the title after playing four five-set matches in that tournament. The closest anyone has got was Steve Denton, who won four five-set matches en route to a runner-up finish at the 1981 Australian Open.

No man has won, or even played, more than four five-set matches in one tournament.

Most five-set matches played within one tournament

Event
Player Five-set
matches played Five-set
matches won
1974 Wimbledon Jan Kodes (TCH) 4 3
1979 Roland Garros Eliot Teltscher (USA) 4 3
1981 Australian Open Steve Denton (USA) 4 4
1989 Miami Yannick Noah (FRA) 4 3
1992 Barcelona Olympics Goran Ivanisevic (CRO) 4 4
1994 Wimbledon Todd Martin (USA) 4 4
1996 Wimbledon Alex Radulescu (GER) 4 3
1999 Australian Open Nicolas Lapentti (ECU) 4 4
2000 Roland Garros Yevgeny Kafelnikov (RUS) 4 3
2002 Wimbledon Nicolas Lapentti (ECU) 4 3
2003 Australian Open Felix Mantilla (ESP) 4 3
2003 Roland Garros Albert Costa (ESP) 4 4

Costa’s defeat of Robredo was also his third comeback from two-sets-to-love down here. This equals the record for the greatest number of 0-2 comebacks by a player at a single Grand Slam tournament in the Open Era, set by Nicolas Escude at the 1998 Australian Open. Escude and Costa staged their comebacks in exactly the same rounds.

Escude’s three 0-2 comebacks at the 1998 Australian Open were the only five-set matches he played at the event. Costa, however, has played a total of four at 2003 Roland Garros – he also defeated Radek Stepanek 63 57 64 36 64 in the second round.

A trio of 0-2 comebacks
Player Event Match
Nicolas Escude (FRA) 1998 Australian Open d. Magnus Larsson 57 46 75 61 108 in 1st rd
d. Richey Reneberg 16 67 62 75 64 in 3rd rd
d. Nicolas Kiefer 46 36 64 61 62 in QFs
Albert Costa (ESP) 2003 Roland Garros d. (LL) Sergio Roitman 67 26 75 62 62 in 1st rd
d. Nicolas Lapentti 46 46 63 64 64 in 3rd rd
d. No. 28 Tommy Robredo 26 36 64 75 62 in QF
TOP OF PAGE


2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY 10 MEN’S NOTES
Wednesday 3 June 2003
Quarterfinals Top Half

Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 9 Albert Costa (ESP) v. No. 28 Tommy Robredo (ESP)
No. 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) v No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez (CHI)


Spain already has the distinction of being the first nation to have four or more players in the quarterfinals at Roland Garros since Australia had five players (John Newcombe, Tony Roche, Ken Rosewall, Fred Stolle and eventual champion Rod Laver) in the final eight here in 1969. Further, Spain is guaranteed a semifinalist at Roland Garros for the fourth consecutive year. This is the longest streak for Spain having at least one semifinalist here in the Open Era.

No. 9 Albert Costa versus No. 28 Tommy Robredo is the 62nd all-Spanish matchup in a Grand Slam tournament in the Open Era and the fourth of the tournament. There is the chance for the winner of that match to face No. 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero in the semifinals, which would be the record-tying fifth all Spanish matchup in a single Grand Slam event in the Open Era. In 1998, Roland Garros had five all-Spanish encounters, including what became the second all-Spanish final of the Open Era (Carlos Moya v Alex Corretja).


On court today…

• In a rematch of the 1998 Roland Garros boys’ final, Juan Carlos Ferrero bids to reach his fourth consecutive Roland Garros semifinal against Fernando Gonzalez, hoping to become just the second Chilean man to reach a Grand Slam semi in the Open Era. Gonzalez won their junior match-up, and each of the two played since as a professional.

• Former Roland Garros boys’ singles runners-up Albert Costa and Tommy Robredo face off in the 62nd all-Spanish matchup in a Grand Slam tournament in the Open Era. Costa, the No. 9 seed, will be attempting to end a five-match losing streak against his countrymen, while Robredo, the No. 28 seed will be attempting to become the fifth Spaniard to make his Grand Slam tournament semifinal debut at Roland Garros.






COURT PHILIPPE CHATRIER

NO. 9 ALBERT COSTA (ESP) v NO. 28 TOMMY ROBREDO (ESP)

Head-to-head: first meeting

While Costa and Robredo have never played each other, it is interesting to note that Costa has played his compatriots a bit more than five times as often as Robredo has. This is Costa’s 102nd career match against a fellow Spaniard and Robredo’s 20th. More tellingly, Costa’s career win-loss record against Spaniards is 62-39; Robredo’s 14-5. In Costa’s first 19 career matches against his countryman, he was 10-9. Worst of all from Costa’s perspective, he is on a five-match losing streak against Spaniards.

Costa’s National Slide
Event Player Result
2002 Kitzbuhel Alex Corretja Lost 61 62 in QF
2002 Tennis Masters Cup Carlos Moya Lost 76 36 64 in RR
2003 Australian Open Felix Mantilla Lost 36 63 46 61 63
2003 TMS Monte Carlo Rafael Nadal Lost Costa 75 63
2003 TMS Rome Felix Mantilla Lost 75 46 61
2003 Roland Garros Tommy Robredo ?????

Costa and Robredo share the distinction of being former Roland Garros boys’ singles runners-up. There were eight former junior runners-up in the men’s singles draw when the tournament began, seven former champions. Interestingly, all of the remaining former runners-up are Spanish, with Costa having lost the 1993 junior title to compatriot Roberto Carretero 60 76, Robredo having lost the 2000 junior title to Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu 36 76 62 and Juan Carlos Ferrero having lost the 1998 junior title to his quarterfinal opponent, Fernando Gonzalez, 46 64 63. Robredo, however, did win the junior doubles title, sharing the 2000 crown with countryman Marc Lopez, a qualifier in 2003 Roland Garros who lost in the second round to No. 13 Jiri Novak.

Costa V Robredo

27 Age 21
9 Entry Ranking 31
12 Titles 1
45-27 Career Grand Slam Record 16-9
Champion
2002 Roland Garros Best Grand Slam Result Quarterfinalist
2003 Roland Garros
27-8 Roland Garros Record 9-2
345-221 Career Record 96-63
244-108 Career Record – Clay 54-24
19-11 2003 Record 22-13
11-5 2003 Record – Clay 15-5
8-12 Career Five-Set Record 4-0
2 Comebacks from 0-2 down 1
97-88 Career Tie-break Record 39-28
6-7 2003 Tie-break Record 8-6
15:03 Total Time on Court 11:10

• Costa advanced to the quarterfinals at 2003 Roland Garros by playing his shortest match of the tournament, defeating Arnaud Clement, the tournament’s last remaining Frenchman, 62 75 75 in 3 hours, 7 minutes in the round of 16. To that point, Costa played three consecutive five-setters coming back from two-sets-to-love down for the second time in the tournament when he defeated Nicolas Lapentti 46 46 63 64 64 in the third round. Before that, he defeated Radek Stepanek 63 57 64 36 64 in the second round, and had the first 0-2 comeback of his career in the first round, defeating lucky loser Sergio Roitman 67 26 75 62 62.

• Costa has already been on court exactly five hours longer than he was to this point in the tournament last year. En route to the quarterfinals last year, he had played a total of 10 hours, 3 minutes, with his longest match having been a 76 61 75 victory against Andrea Gaudenzi in 2 hours, 45 minutes in the third round. Costa’s longest match this year was his third round victory against Nicolas Lapentti, which took 4 hours, 38 minutes. (Costa’s total time on court in winning the title last year was 19 hours, 17 minutes.)

• Costa is in line to become only the seventh man to successfully defend his Roland Garros title. In the Open Era, six players have successfully defended their Roland Garros crown on a total of nine occasions. Gustavo Kuerten, in 2001, was the last player to successfully defend his title. Coincidentally, Kuerten’s 17-match winning streak at Roland Garros was ended last year by Costa 64 75 64 in the round of 16. The full list of Open Era title defences can be found on pages 1-2 of the tournament preview.

• At the beginning of the tournament, Costa was among six former Roland Garros champions in the draw. Only three made it to the quarterfinals: Costa, Andre Agassi and Carlos Moya. Three former champions is the most to play in the quarterfinals at Roland Garros in the Open Era, equalling the mark previously achieved in 2001 (Agassi, Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Gustavo Kuerten) and 1987 (Ivan Lendl, Yannick Noah and Mats Wilander).

• Costa quite nearly became the first Roland Garros defending champion to lose in the first round. In the first round, Sergio Roitman was up a break in the third set until Costa came back from 67 26 14 down.

• Costa is the fifth player to come from two-sets-to-love down twice within a single Roland Garros, joining Ronald Agenor of Haiti (1994), Mel Purcell of the United States (1981), Gene Mayer of the United States (1979) and Eduardo Zuleta of Ecuador (1968). He is the first player to achieve this within any Grand Slam event since Stefan Koubek at the 2002 Australian Open.

• Additionally, Costa is the first player to win three consecutive five-set matches at Roland Garros since Gustavo Kuerten in 1997, when he defeated Thomas Muster 67 61 63 36 64 in the third round, Andrei Medvedev 57 61 62 16 75 in the round of 16 and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 62 57 26 60 64 in the quarterfinals.

• Costa had never previously won back-to-back five set matches in a Grand Slam tournament. (This is his 29th major.)

• The first three rounds contained Costa’s first five-set match wins since last year’s Roland Garros. Since defeating Guillermo Canas 75 36 67 64 60 here in the 2002 quarterfinals, Costa had gone out at each of the two subsequent Grand Slam tournaments he has played – the 2002 US Open and the 2003 Australian Open – in five sets. He lost in the second round at Flushing Meadows to Wayne Ferreira 16 67 64 75 64, and in the third round in Melbourne to Felix Mantilla 36 63 46 61 63. (Costa did not to play 2002 Wimbledon because he was on his honeymoon.)

• Costa is playing his 10th consecutive Roland Garros. Costa’s triumph here last year ended his run of 65 tournaments without a title dating back to 1999 Kitzbuhel. He defeated two fellow Spaniards en route to his first Grand Slam title: good friend Alex Corretja 63 64 36 63 in the semifinals and Juan Carlos Ferrero 61 60 46 63 in the final.

• Since 2002 Roland Garros, Costa has gone another 22 tournaments without success. His best results during this period have been reaching the final on clay at Amersfoort in July 2002 (losing to Juan Ignacio Chela 61 76) and the semifinals on hard court at TMS Miami in March 2003. At Miami, Costa defeated Roger Federer 76 46 76 in the quarterfinals then lost in the semifinals to Andre Agassi 62 64.

• Costa played five European clay court tournaments in preparation for this year’s Roland Garros, and had his best results at TMS Rome, where he reached the third round before losing to eventual champion Felix Mantilla 75 46 61, and at Barcelona, where he lost in the third round to Agustin Calleri 64 62.

• Robredo advanced to the quarterfinals at 2003 Roland Garros by defeating three-time champion Gustavo Kuerten 64 16 76 64 in the round of 16, having upset No. 1 seed Lleyton Hewitt 46 16 63 62 63 in the third round. Robredo defeated Jonas Bjorkman 76 63 64 in the second round and qualifier Giovanni Lapentti 36 76 36 31 ret. In the first round, Lapentti retiring with cramps in both legs.

• Robredo is competing in his first Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal. Of the 14 Spaniards, including Robredo, who have reached at least the quarterfinals at a major, nine made their Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal debut at Roland Garros. Of the previous eight, four advanced onward to the semifinals, two went on to the final and Sergi Bruguera became the only Spaniard thus far to make his Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal debut and win his first Grand Slam tournament title within the same event.




Spaniards Making Their Grand Slam QF Debut* at Roland Garros
Year Spaniard Quarterfinal Result End Result
1968 Andres Gimeno defeated Boro Jovanovic 64 60 62 lost in SF to Ken Rosewall 36 63 75 36 63
1977 Jose Higueras lost to Phil Dent 61 63 36 67 63 Quarterfinalist
1988 Emilio Sanchez lost to Mats Wilander 67 76 63 64 Quarterfinalist
1993 Sergi Bruguera defeated Pete Sampras 63 46 61 64 won final, defeating Jim Courier 64 26 62 36 63
1994 Alberto Berasategui defeated Goran Ivanisevic 64 63 63 lost in final to Bruguera 63 75 26 61
1995 Albert Costa lost to Thomas Muster 62 36 67 75 62 Quarterfinalist
1997 Galo Blanco lost to Patrick Rafter 63 76 63 Quarterfinalist
2000 Juan Carlos Ferrero defeated Alex Corretja 64 64 62 lost in SF to Gustavo Kuerten 75 46 26 64 63
2003 Tommy Robredo v Albert Costa ?????
* Open Era (1968-present) only

• Similar to Costa, Robredo has had a five-set achievement of his own during 2003 Roland Garros. He won his first five-setter from two-sets-to-love down when he defeated Lleyton Hewitt in the third round, as stated above. Robredo was trailing 0-3 in the final set, and won the next six games to take the match in 3 hours 24 minutes. (It was the first time in his career that Hewitt had lost a match after holding a two-set lead.)

• Robredo reached his first Grand Slam tournament round of 16 on his Roland Garros debut in 2001, losing to Yevgeny Kafelnikov 63 64 16 64. He also advanced to the round of 16 at the 2001 US Open, falling to Andy Roddick 62 62 64.

• Robredo lost in the third round at last year’s Roland Garros, to Andre Agassi 62 64 62.

• Robredo is the youngest man remaining in 2003 Roland Garros, at 21 years, 1 month old.

• Robredo has reached two semifinals this season, on hard court at Dubai (losing to Jiri Novak 64 61) and on clay at Estoril (losing to Agustin Calleri 64 62).

• In addition to his semifinal finish at Estoril, Robredo also reached the quarters at 64-draw Barcelona in the run-up to Roland Garros. There he again lost to Calleri, 67 64 64.

• Robredo has one career title, won on clay at 2001 Sopot. He has not reached another final in the 22 months since. Having climbed 101 places up the Entry Ranking in 2001 to end that year at No. 30, Robredo was unable to make further progress the following year. He finished in exactly the same spot, No. 30, at the end of 2002, and entered Roland Garros at No. 31.



NO. 3 JUAN CARLOS FERRERO (ESP) v NO. 19 FERNANDO GONZALEZ (CHI)

Head-to-head: Gonzalez leads 2-0
2002 US Open Hard (O) R32 Gonzalez 64 64 64
2002 Basle Carpet (I) SF Gonzalez 64 46 61

Gonzalez won both their previous meetings, but the pair have never previously faced each other on clay. They did however play on the surface when they contested the 1998 Roland Garros boys’ final, and Gonzalez won, defeating Ferrero 46 64 63 for the title. These three meetings account for all the times they have played at any level of competition, junior or senior, including challengers, futures and satellite tournaments.

Ferrero is the older of the two by five months: he is 23 years 3 months, Gonzalez is 22 years 10 months. Both men have so far been on court for a similar length of time, having both lost just one set and each having benefited from a retirement (Ferrero in the third round, Gonzalez in the round of 16).

Ferrero v Gonzalez

23 Age 22
3 Entry Ranking 20
9 Titles 3
37-12 Career Grand Slam Record 17-8
Runner-up
2002 Roland Garros Best Grand Slam Result Quarterfinalist
2002 US Open,
2003 Roland Garros
20-3 Roland Garros Record 7-2
204-87 Career Record 75-48
118-27 Career Record – Clay 43-24
37-7 2003 Record 18-9
25-2 2003 Record – Clay 16-5
10-8 Career Five-Set Record 6-2
1 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
68-59 Career Tie-break Record 33-18
6-6 2003 Tie-break Record 9-2
7:36 Total Time on Court 7:09

• Ferrero’s path to quarterfinals at 2003 Roland Garros began when he defeated Michel Kratochvil 75 75 64 in the first round and won his second round match 62 30 ret. when Nicolas Massu could not continue because he was suffering the effects of his injured left ankle, which he had sprained in his previous match. In the third round, Ferrero defeated Tim Henman 46 62 64 62.

• In the round of 16, Ferrero had his seventh straight victory over Felix Mantilla 62 61 61. Interestingly, since he is guaranteed to meet another countryman if he advances to the semifinals, this was Ferrero’s 11th consecutive win against a fellow Spaniard.

• Ferrero’s defeat of Mantilla in the round of 16 was his easiest win at Roland Garros since beating South African Marcos Ondruska 62 62 60 in the second round in 2001.

• Ferrero is playing Roland Garros for the fourth time and has never yet failed to reach the semifinals. He had a runner-up finish last year, defeating No. 4 seed Andre Agassi 63 57 75 63 in the quarterfinals and No. 2 seed Marat Safin 63 62 64 in the semifinals. Albert Costa stopped Ferrero from winning his first Grand Slam tournament title by winning 61 60 46 63 in the final.

• In the Open Era, only four players have advanced to the semifinals of Roland Garros for four consecutive years. In order, they were Bjorn Borg (1978-81), Mats Wilander (1982-85), Ivan Lendl (1984-87) and Jim Courier (1991-94). Ferrero is currently one of three further men to have played three consecutive semis here. However, of these seven, only one other person – Agassi – has appeared in three consecutive Roland Garros semifinals without winning the tournament at least one year during the streak. (Agassi did win the title in 1999.)

Most consecutive Roland Garros semifinals
Player Consecutive Semifinals Finals* Titles^
Bjorn Borg 4 (1978-79-80-81) 4 4
Mats Wilander 4 (1982-83-84-85) 3 2
Ivan Lendl 4 (1984-85-86-87) 4 3
Jim Courier 4 (1991-92-93-94) 3 2
Andre Agassi 3 (1990-91-92) 2 0
Sergi Bruguera 3 (1993-94-95) 2 2
Juan Carlos Ferrero 3 (2000-01-02) 1 0
* - does not include all career finals, only those from three or more consecutive semifinals
^ - does not include all career titles, only those from three or more consecutive semifinals

• If he does reach the semifinals, Ferrero will face either defending champion and No. 9 seed Albert Costa or No. 28 Tommy Robredo. Ferrero trails Costa 2-3 in head-to-head meetings, and ties Robredo 1-1.

• Against Chileans, Ferrero has a 5-4 career win-loss record. His sole previous meeting with a Chilean in a Grand Slam event was his third round defeat by Gonzalez at last year’s US Open, as described above.

• Ferrero trails Gonzalez 0-2 in (senior) career meetings. Gonzalez is one of just 12 men who have a meaningful winning record against Ferrero, meaningful being considered to be more than 1-0.

Players with a winning record vs Ferrero*
Player Win-loss
Younes El Aynaoui 5-0
Marat Safin 4-3
Richard Krajicek 3-0
Greg Rusedski 3-0
Albert Costa 3-2
Lleyton Hewitt 3-2
Fernando Gonzalez 2-0
Ivan Ljubicic 2-0
Raemon Sluiter 2-0
Magnus Gustafsson 2-1
Yevgeny Kafelnikov 2-1
Adrian Voinea 2-1
* not including 1-0 records

• Ferrero has been very impressive on clay this year, compiling a 25-2 record. This puts him in third place for the most wins on the surface so far this season.

2003 Kings of Clay (through bottom half quarterfinals)
Rank Player Win-Loss
1 Gaston Gaudio (ARG) 28-10
2. Carlos Moya (ESP) 27-7
3. Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) 25-2
4. Agustin Calleri (ARG) 24-9
5. Guillermo Coria (ARG) 23-4
Players in bold still active at 2003 Roland Garros

• Ferrero won the first 12 clay court matches he played this year, including the title at TMS Monte Carlo, where he defeated Guillermo Coria 62 62 in the final. Marat Safin ended Ferrero’s streak in the semifinals of Barcelona, winning 64 63. Ferrero then started a nine-match winning streak, also on clay, including the title at Valencia, before retiring from his semifinal match against Roger Federer at TMS Rome because of tendonitis in his right shoulder.

• Even though Ferrero began 2002 battling injury (he missed the 2002 Australian Open because of a knee injury), his year thus far has been remarkably better. He entered Roland Garros having won more than twice as many matches (33-7 in 2003 vs. 15-11 in 2002). In fact, his 33 match wins to the start of the tournament are almost 70 percent of his total match victories (48) for 2002.

• Ferrero had some good results on hard court at the start of the season, reaching the final at Sydney (losing to Hyung-Taik Lee 46 76 76) and a week later reaching the quarters at Australian Open (losing to Wayne Ferreira 76 76 61).

• Gonzalez advanced to the quarterfinals by defeating No. 30 Jarkko Nieminen 63 63 62 in the round of 16. He defeated Sjeng Schalken 76 63 31 ret. in the third round, the Dutchman retiring due to weakness caused by a suspected virus. Gonzalez defeated Albert Portas 63 46 64 62 in the second round and Jan-Michael Gambill 60 62 63 in the first.

• Gonzalez has equalled his career-best Grand Slam tournament result. He reached his first quarterfinal at a major at the 2002 US Open, his seventh Grand Slam event. He was stopped there in five sets by Sjeng Schalken, losing 67 63 63 67 76.

• Gonzalez’s first appearance in the Roland Garros quarterfinals comes out of his first appearance in the round of 16 here. He is the fourth different Chilean to advance this far at Roland Garros in the Open Era, joining Patricio Cornejo, Hans Gildemeister and Marcelo Rios.

• Of the three Chilean men who have previously reached the quarterfinals at Roland Garros, none has gone any further. Only one Chilean has ever progressed to the semifinals at any Grand Slam event: at the 1998 Australian Open, Marcelo Rios defeated Alberto Berasategui 67 64 64 60 in the quarterfinals, then defeated Nicolas Escude 61 63 62 in the semifinals. He lost in the final to Petr Korda, 62 62 62.

• Gonzalez advanced to the Roland Garros quarterfinals after his first appearance in the round of 16, as did predecessors Patricio Cornejo and Hans Gildemeister. Marcelo Rios did not reach the last eight until his third time to the round of 16.

• Chileans have won just one of 13 previous quarterfinal appearances in Grand Slam tournaments in the Open Era.

Chileans in Grand Slam Quarterfinals
Player Quarterfinal Appearances Result
Patricio Cornejo 1974 Roland Garros Lost to Manuel Orantes 63 63 61
Jaime Fillol 1975 US Open Lost to Guillermo Vilas 64 60 61
Hans Gildemeister 1978 Roland Garros Lost to Guillermo Vilas 64 26 61 36 63
1979 Roland Garros Lost to Bjorn Borg 64 61 75
1980 Roland Garros Lost to Jimmy Connors 64 60 60
Ricardo Acuna 1985 Wimbledon Lost to Jimmy Connors 61 76 62
Marcelo Rios 1997 Australian Open Lost to Michael Chang 75 61 64
1997 US Open Lost to Michael Chang 75 62 46 46 63
1998 Australian Open Defeated Alberto Berasategui 67 64 64 60
1998 Roland Garros Lost to Carlos Moya 61 26 62 64
1999 Roland Garros Lost to Dominik Hrbaty 76 62 67 63
2002 Australian Open Lost to Tommy Haas 76 64 67 76
Fernando Gonzalez 2002 US Open Lost to Sjeng Schalken 67 63 63 67 76
2003 Roland Garros ???

• If he does reach the semifinals, Gonzalez will face either defending champion and No. 9 seed Albert Costa or No. 28 Tommy Robredo. Gonzalez leads Robredo 2-0, and has never played Costa.

• As 2003 Roland Garros began, Gonzalez was one of seven men who had also won the boys’ singles title here. The 1998 champion, Gonzalez is now one of two former Roland Garros junior champions left in the tournament, joining a fellow South American Guillermo Coria (1999), from Argentina.


• This is Gonzalez’s third appearance at Roland Garros. Last year, he defeated Fernando Meligeni 62 36 61 62 in the second round then lost in the third round to Gustavo Kuerten, 63 26 76 64. On his debut as a qualifier in 2001, he defeated wild card Cyril Saulnier 26 62 16 75 64 in the first round then lost in the second to Jacobo Diaz 36 75 63 64.

• Before his defeat of Portas in the second round, Gonzalez had never faced a Spaniard at Roland Garros. He has a 3-2 record against the nation in all Grand Slam events.

• In all matches, Gonzalez is 17-9 against Spaniards, and is currently on a four-match winning streak against them, going back to Acapulco in February.
Gonzalez’s Spanish Streak
Event Player Result
2003 Acapulco Ruben Ramirez-Hidalgo Won 61 36 76 in 1st rd
2003 Estoril David Ferrer Won 62 46 64 in 1st rd
2003 TMS Hamburg Felix Mantilla Won 62 61 in 2nd rd
2003 Roland Garros Albert Portas Won 63 46 64 62 in 2nd rd

• Gonzalez has reached three quarterfinals on clay this season: at Acapulco, Estoril and most recently at TMS Hamburg, where he defeated Lleyton Hewitt 61 36 60 in the round of 16 then lost to David Nalbandian 57 63 64.

• Gonzalez is currently on an eight-match winning streak. Two weeks ago in Dusseldorf, Gonzalez helped Chile to the World Team Cup title, winning all three of his round robin matches and defeating Jiri Novak 76 76 in the final versus Czech Republic. He also had a perfect record in the doubles, teaming with Nicolas Massu to win all four matches.

• Gonzalez was hindered during the February clay court swing by two injuries. He had to withdraw from his second round match at Buenos Aires after a freak accident playing doubles with Jose Acasuso, when he was struck in the eye. A week later at Acapulco, he had to retire from his quarterfinal match against Gustavo Kuerten with an arm injury after losing the first set.
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ROLAND GARROS – Paris-FRA
SEMIFINAL MATCH NOTES,
Thursday 5 June 2003


NUMBER ONE ADVANTAGE, OR NOT?
Since 1925, the No.1-seeded woman has won 31 of the 72 singles championships held at Roland Garros a 43.05 winning percentage. In the Open era (since 1968), the top seed has won 15 of 35 titles at Roland Garros a 42.86 winning percentage, but since 1981, the No.1 has won only six times a 27% record, and not since 1996 (Graf).

No.1-seeded champions
Suzanne Lenglen (FRA) 1925/26
Helen Wills Moody (USA) 1928/29/30
Cilly Ausseem (GER) 1931
Hilde Sperling (GER) 1936/37
Simone Mathieu (FRA) 1938/39
Margaret Osbourne DuPont (USA) 1949
Margaret Connolly (USA) 1953/54
Shirley Bloomer (GBR) 1957
Margaret Smith Court (AUS) 1964/69/70/73
Chris Evert (USA) 1974/75/79/80
Sue Barker (GBR) 1976
Mima Jausovec (YUG) 1977
Martina Navratilova (USA) 1984
Steffi Graf (GER) 1988/93/96
Monica Seles (YUG) 1991/92

The earliest losses the No.1 seed has suffered at Roland Garros in the tournament's history (since seedings were introduced when the tournament opened to foreign competitors in 1925) are as follows:

1960 Zsuzsi Kormoczy (HUN) Third Round
1961 Darlene Hard (USA) Fourth Round
1971* Margaret Court (AUS) Fourth Round
1983* Martina Navratilova (USA) Fourth Round
* Since 1968, these are the only occasions the No.1 seed has lost prior to the semifinal round

RANKING PROJECTIONS
• Serena Williams and Kim Clijsters will remain at Nos.1 and 2 respectively, regardless of their finishes at Roland Garros
• Justine Henin-Hardenne will replace Venus Williams in the No.3 spot, regardless of her results in the rest of the event
• Quarterfinalist Conchita Martinez will return to the Top 20 for the first time since August 2001
• By reaching the semifinals, Nadia Petrova will re-enter the Top 30 for the first time since January 2002

MONEY MILESTONES
By virtue of reaching her first-ever Grand Slam singles semifinal, Nadia Petrova becomes the 134th woman to join the Million Dollar Club for career earnings. Currently with US$790,780, the Russian will reach the impressive milestone following this event, with her results in doubles and mixed doubles only adding to her fortnight’s haul.

Meanwhile, world No.2 Kim Clijsters, currently on US$4,802,349, will pass the US$5 million mark by virtue of reaching the singles semifinals and quarterfinals of the doubles, in which she is seeded No.2 with Japan’s Ai Sugiyama.

PETROVA SURPRISE SEMIFINALIST
Russian 20-year-old Nadia Petrova is the third lowest-ranked player ever to reach the semifinals of Roland Garros, the lowest being French woman Brigitte Simon in 1978. It is the second straight year there is an unseeded semifinalist, following Argentina’s Clarisa Fernandez’s surprise run last year. Prior to that, the last unseeded semifinalist at the French was Jennifer Capriati in 1990. Below is a look at the lowest-ranked players in the Open Era to reach the last four of Roland Garros and then the lowest-ranked* players to reach a Grand Slam semifinal:

ROLAND GARROS: Brigitte Simon (FRA) 1978 No.99
Clarisa Fernandez (ARG) 2002 No.87
Nadia Petrova (RUS) 2003 No.76
Nicole Provis-Bradtke (AUS) 1988 No.53
Camille Benjamin (USA) 1984 No.47
Renata Tomanova (TCH) 1976 No.47
Florenta Mihai (ROM) 1977 No.40

GRAND SLAMS: PLAYER RANK GRAND SLAM SEMIFINAL
Mirjana Lucic No.134 1999 Wimbledon
Diane Evers No.113 1979 Australian Open
Chris O’Neil No.111 1978 Australian Open
Gigi Fernandez No.99 1994 Wimbledon
Brigitte Simon No.99 1978 Roland Garros
Clarisa Fernandez No.87 2002 Roland Garros
Alexandra Stevenson No.86 1999 Wimbledon
Claudia Porwick No.81 1999 Australian Open
Betsy Nagelsen No.78 1978 Australian Open
Nadia Petrova No.76 2003 Roland Garros
Barbara Jordan No.68 1979 Australian Open
Venus Williams No.66 1997 US Open
* Note this list does not include Karen Krantzcke (1977 [Jan.] Australian Open), Christine Matison (1979 Australian Open) or Mary Sawyer (1980 Australian Open), all of whom were unranked at the time of those tournaments, as six tournaments were required for a computer world ranking prior to 1986

SERENA CLOSING IN
Serena Williams has not lost a singles match at a Grand Slam since the 2001 US Open final when her sister Venus came through 62 64. Since then Serena has won the last four Grand Slam tournaments she has entered since Roland Garros 2002, and her current Grand Slam match win-streak stands at 33 – sixth in the Open Era.


PLAYER GS MATCH
WIN-STREAK
CONSECUTIVE GRAND SLAM TITLES
RUN ENDED
Martina NAVRATILOVA 45 6 – 1983 Wim, US, Aus, 1984 RG, Wim, US 1984 Aus Open SF
Steffi GRAF 45 6 – 1995 RG, Wim, US; 1996 RG, Wim, US 1997 Aus Open 4r
Monica SELES 41 5 – 1991 Aus, RG; US, 1992 Aus, RG 1992 Wim. Final
Steffi GRAF 40 5 – 1988 Aus, RG, Wim, US; 1989 Aus 1989 RG Final
Margaret COURT 35 6 – 1969 US, 1970 Aus, RG, Wim, US, 1971 Aus 1971 RG 3r
Serena WILLIAMS 33* 4 – 2002 RG, Wim, US, 2003 Aus ???
Billie Jean KING 31 5 – 1971 US; 1972 RG, Wim, US; 1973 Wim 1973 US 3r

IT’S DOWN TO THE LAST FOUR…
PLAYER RANK NAT AGE YTD PRIZE $* YTD W/L CAREER PRIZE $* CAREER W/L
[1] Serena Williams 1 USA 21 1,290,687 31/2 11,332,679 241/46
[2] Kim Clijsters 2 BEL 19 1,153,069 41/5 4,802,349 234/70
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 4 BEL 21 745,888 34/5 3,171,138 244/76
Nadia Petrova 76 RUS 20 110,739 21/9 790,780 141/81
*Match records are up to date through the quarterfinals; prize money figures do not include this tournament


ROAD TO THE SEMIFINALS

(1) SERENA WILLIAMS (USA #1)
R128: d. Barbara Rittner (GER #87) 62 61 (0:53)
R64: d. Marie-Gaianeh Mikaelian (USA #39) 63 62 (1:06)
R32: d. Barbara Schett (AUT #51) 60 60 (0:40)
R16: d. (16) Ai Sugiyama (JPN #15) 75 63 (1:31)
QF: d. (5) Amélie Mauresmo (FRA #5) 61 62 (1:04)
Total games: 80
Won/lost: 61/19
Total time on court: 5:14






















vs. (4) JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE (BEL #4)
R128: d. Patricia Wartusch (AUT #82) 63 75 (1:22)
R64: d. Jelena Kostanic (CRO #109) 62 62 (1:13)
R32: d. Dally Randriantefy (MAD #83) 61 61 (0:50)
R16: d. (19) Patty Schnyder (SUI #18) 63 26 62 (1:50)
QF: d. (8) Chanda Rubin (USA #8) 63 62 (1:06)
Total games: 92
Won/lost: 63/29
Total time on court: 6:21
NADIA PETROVA (RUS #76)
R128: d. (12) Monica Seles (USA #12) 64 60 (1:01)
R64: d. Silvija Talaja (CRO #94) 61 61 (0:47)
R32: d. Marissa Irvin (USA #100) 61 61 (0:45)
R16: d. (7) Jennifer Capriati (USA #7) 63 46 63 (2:00)
QF: d. (22) Vera Zvonareva (RUS #21) 61 46 63 (1:52)
Total games: 98
Won/lost: 68/30
Total time on court: 6:25

vs. (2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2)
R128: d. Amy Frazier (USA #41) 62 60 (0:45)
R64: d. Marlene Weingärtner (GER #72) 62 62 (0:52)
R32: d. (30) Paola Suárez (ARG #31) 62 61 (1:04)
R16: d. (15) Magdalena Maleeva (BUL #16) 06 62 61 (1:21)
QF: d. (24) Conchita Martinez (ESP #22) 62 61 (1:09)
Total games: 81
Won/lost: 60/21
Total time on court: 5:11

GRAND SLAM SEMIFINAL HISTORIES

Player Total SF* Last SF Appearance Notes
[1] S.Williams 8 2003 Australian Open On 33-match Grand Slam win streak, taking in last four majors
[2] Clijsters 4 2003 Australian Open Second Roland Garros semifinal from the past three years
[4] Henin-Hardenne 4 2003 Australian Open Will overtake Venus Williams at No.3 after reaching the semis
Petrova 1 Debut First Russian Grand Slam semifinalist since Dementieva at 2000 US Open
* Includes 2003 Roland Garros

CAREER GRAND SLAM SEMIFINAL RECORDS*
Player Australian Open Roland Garros Wimbledon US Open Total
[1] Serena Williams 1-0 1-0 1-1 3-0 6-1
[2] Kim Clijsters 0-2 1-0 0-0 0-0 1-2
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 0-1 0-1 0-1 0-0 0-3
Nadia Petrova 0-0 First 0-0 0-0 Debut
* Does not include results from Roland Garros 2003

CAREER RECORDS AT ROLAND GARROS
Player Career Win-Loss Record at Roland Garros*
[1] Serena Williams 21-3
[2] Kim Clijsters 13-3
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 11-3
Nadia Petrova 8-2
* Includes main draw matches only and 2003 results at Roland Garros

SEMIFINAL MATCH-UPS

(1) SERENA WILLIAMS (USA #1) vs. (4) JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE (BEL #4)
Head-to-Head: Williams leads 4-2
Last Meeting: 2003 Charleston (Green Clay/Outdoors), Final, Henin-Hardenne won 63 64

S.Williams Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: 22 WTA Tour career prize money: $11,332,679

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fifth appearance; in 1998 debut held 64 52 lead on eventual winner Sánchez-Vicario; in 2001, extended eventual winner Capriati to 3s in QF; won title last year, d. world No.1 Capriati and No.2 V.Williams en route
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 5)
WINNER (3): Australian Open, Paris Indoors, Miami; FINALIST (1): Charleston; SEMIFINALIST (1): Rome
• Started season by winning her first 21 matches in three-title sweep of Australian Open (d. Clijsters in SF, saving 2 mp and V.Williams in final in 3s to complete non-calendar year Grand Slam), Paris Indoors (d. Mauresmo in final) and Miami (d. Capriati in final in 3s); winning streak ended in Charleston final, l. to Henin-Hardenne, her first loss since falling to another Belgian, Clijsters, in season-ending Championships final in November; represented USA in Fed Cup World Group 1r tie vs. Czech Republic, winning both singles rubbers and partnering Venus to win doubles; semifinalist in Rome falling to Mauresmo in 3s after serving for the match leading 61 54; first losses at consecutive tournaments since Charleston-Berlin 2002
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 22 WTA Tour singles titles, including the past four Grand Slams, becoming only the fifth woman in history to hold all four major singles crowns at one time; winner of 2002 Roland Garros, Wimbledon and US Open and 2003 Australian Open, d. sister Venus in each final; in winner of 11 doubles titles, six of those Grand Slams (all w/Venus and at least one at each Grand Slam); attained world No.1 ranking on 8 July 2002 by reaching Wimbledon final, replacing Venus in the top spot; has been ranked No.1 ever since
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 (8 July 2002 – present)
• Coached by her father, Richard Williams and mother, Oracene Price; here with trainer Kerrie Brooks and hitting partner Jovan Savic

Henin-Hardenne Quick Facts
Age: 20 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,171,138

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her fourth appearance here; semifinalist in 2001, holding a 62 42 lead on compatriot Clijsters before falling in 3s; last year as No.5 seed was suffering from bronchitis and fell 1r to qualifier Kapros in 3s; right elbow injury prevented her from taking part in 2000; in 1999 2r, almost stunned world No.2 Davenport on Court Central before falling 75 final set
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Dubai, Charleston, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (4): Sydney, Australian Open, Antwerp, Amelia Island
• Began season as semifinalist in Sydney (losing to eventual winner Clijsters 62 63) and Australian Open, surviving marathon 4r vs. Davenport in second longest match (in terms of total games played) played there from 4r on in the Open Era, winning 75 57 97 before being halted by world No.2 V.Williams in SF; in Antwerp, reached SF, falling to compatriot Clijsters 62 76(3) after trailing 5-2 second set; won title at Dubai as top seed, d. No.3 seed Capriati in SF and No.4 seed Seles in F; reached QF in Miami falling to Rubin; scored first ever-win over a world No.1 when she ended Serena Williams unbeaten 21-0 run in 2003 in the final of Charleston on April 13; fell in SF Amelia Island as top seed to Dementieva after holding a mp; joined Graf as only second player in Berlin tournament’s history to retain the German Open d. Mauresmo (saving sp in first set) and Clijsters (saving 3 mp in third set)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of nine WTA Tour singles titles and two doubles titles; runner-up at 2001 Wimbledon and semifinalist at 2001 Roland Garros, 2002 Wimbledon and 2003 Australian Open; one of only four current players (along with Clijsters, Seles & Davenport) to have wins over S.Williams, V.Williams and Capriati; in 1999, won Antwerp in her Tour debut, becoming the fifth player at that stage to achieve that feat; member of Belgian Fed Cup team 2000-03 (winning title in 2001)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.4 (28 October – 10 November 2002, 27 January 2003 - present)
• Coached by Carlos Rodriguez since 1996

(2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2) vs. NADIA PETROVA (RUS #76)
Head-to-Head: Clijsters leads 1-0
Last Meeting: 2002 Leipzig (Carpet/Indoors), R16, Clijsters won 64 62

Clijsters Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 12 WTA Tour career prize money: $4,802,349

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fourth consecutive appearance in this event; finalist in 2001, d. compatriot Henin-Hardenne in 3s SF the day before her 18th birthday; was four times just two points from winning title before falling to Capriati 16 64 1210 in longest third set to a women’s final in the tournament’s history; surprise 3r loser to C.Fernandez as the No.4 seed last year
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Rome; FINALIST (3): Antwerp, Scottsdale, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (2): Australian Open, Miami
• Reached SF or better at all eight tournaments, her most consistent start to a season; started 2003 by winning Sydney to become only fourth player in last 20 years (Graf, Seles and Navratilova) to win three or more consecutive titles without loss of a set (2002 Luxembourg and Championships) and continued to Australian Open SF where she led 51 third set and held 2 mp at 52 vs. world No.1 and eventual champion S.Williams before falling 46 63 75; on home soil, reached Antwerp final, d. No.4 Henin-Hardenne in SF (l. to V.Williams); finalist in Scottsdale, serving for the match vs. Sugiyama before falling in 3s; collected career-first Tier I singles title at Indian Wells as No.1 seed, d. Davenport in final; extended win streak to 10 by reaching Miami SF (l. to S.Williams); on 14 April, ascended to world No.2 WTA Ranking, the sixth youngest to do so (after Jaeger, Hingis, Austin, Seles and Graf); in Berlin, scored her first win over Capriati and held 3 mp in final vs. Henin-Hardenne before falling 64 46 75; won second Tier I title of the season in Rome, avenging Scottsdale loss to Sugyiama and d. Mauresmo in the final after Mauresmo served for the match leading 63 65; in doubles, has won three titles to date (all w/Sugiyama) at Sydney, Antwerp and Scottsdale
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Rome; first title came at 1999 Luxembourg as a qualifier; runner-up at 2001 Roland Garros, d. Henin-Hardenne in SF after trailing 62 42 and in final, was two points from victory vs. Capriati on four occasions before falling 16 64 1210, featuring the longest third set in a Roland Garros women’s singles final; also semifinalist at 2002 and 2003 Australian Opens; member of the Belgian Fed Cup Team 2000-03, helping her country win its first-ever title in 2001; winner of seven Tour doubles titles; mixed doubles runner-up at 2000 Wimbledon (w/Hewitt)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.2 (14 April – 5 May, 12 May 2003 – present)
• Coached by Marc Dehous since July 2002; physical trainer is Eveline Coppens

Petrova Quick Facts
Age: 20 WTA Tour career singles titles: none WTA Tour career prize money: $790,780

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making third appearance here; reached 4r in 2001 before falling to S.Williams
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
THIRD ROUND (2): Australian Open, Rome
• Playing her ninth Tour event of 2003, sixth in the main draw; started season by qualifying for Gold Coast, reaching 2r before falling to No.4-seeded compatriot Bovina in 3s; after withdrawing from Canberra with right shoulder, strain, reached 3r at Australian Open for second time, d. No.21 seed Sugiyama in 2r before falling to No.12 seed Schnyder in 3s; after losing 1r at Tokyo [Pan Pacific] to Krasnoroutskaya in 3s, failed to qualify for Indian Wells and Miami; qualified for Sarasota, d. Likhovtseva 1r before retiring against eventual champion Myskina at opening of third set with right ankle sprain; retired in 2r of Amelia Island qualifying with same injury; in Berlin, reached 2r before falling to No.12 seed Daniilidou in 3s; in Rome, reached 3r (when Seles retired) and stretched No.5 seed Capriati 75 63
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of four ITF Women’s Circuit singles titles (one in 1997 and three in 1998); reached career-first Grand Slam round of 16s at 2001 Roland Garros and Wimbledon; twice a WTA Tour semifinalist, at 2001 Amelia Island (l. to world No.10 Coetzer in 3s) and 2002 Gold Coast (l. to V.Williams); winner of three Tour doubles titles – 2001 ’s-Hertogenbosch (w/Dragomir Ilie) and Linz (w/Dokic) and 2002 Linz (w/Dokic); a member of the Russian Fed Cup Team in 2001
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.29 (7-13 January 2002)
• Coached by Glen Schaap

ROLAND GARROS SEMIFINAL HISTORY
Below is a complete list of all Roland Garros semifinalists in the Open Era (1968-present). In 1968, there was a 96-player draw with 16 seeds. Between 1969 and 1977 only eight players were seeded in the 64 singles draw; 16 seeds in a 64-player draw from 1978 to 1980, 16 seeds in a 96-player draw from 1981 and 1992, before changing to 16 seeds and a 128 draw in 1983 and then 32 seeds in a 128 draw in 2002 (Names in Italics Underlined type advanced to the finals; Bold type denotes winners).

2003 (1)S.Williams (2)Clijsters (4)Henin-Hardenne Petrova
2002 (1)Capriati (2)V.Williams (3)S.Williams Fernandez
2001 (1)Hingis (4)Capriati (12)Clijsters (14)Henin
2000 (1)Hingis (5)Martinez (6)Pierce (8)Sánchez-Vicario
1999 (1)Hingis (3)Seles (6)Graf (7)Sánchez-Vicario
1998 (1)Hingis (2)Davenport (4)Sánchez-Vicario (6)Seles
1997 (1)Hingis (3)Seles (9)Majoli (11)Coetzer
1996 (Co-1)Graf (3)Martinez (4)Sánchez-Vicario (10)Novotna
1995 (1)Sánchez-Vicario (2)Graf (4)Martinez (9)Date
1994 (1)Graf (2)Sánchez-Vicario (3)Martinez (12)Pierce
1993 (1)Graf (2)Sánchez-Vicario (5)MJ.Fernandez (8)Huber
1992 (1)Seles (2)Graf (3)Sabatini (4)Sánchez-Vicario
1991 (1)Seles (2)Graf (3)Sabatini (5)Sánchez-Vicario
1990 (1)Graf (2)Seles (11)Novotna Capriati
1989 (1)Graf (7)Sánchez (15)MJ.Fernandez Seles
1988 (1)Graf (4)Sabatini (13)Zvereva Provis
1987 (1)Navratilova (2)Graf (3)Evert-Lloyd (7)Sabatini
1986 (1)Navratilova (2)Evert-Lloyd (5)Mandlikova (6)Sukova
1985 (1)Navratilova (2)Evert-Lloyd (7)Kohde-Kilsch (14)Sabatini
1984 (1)Navratilova (2)Evert-Lloyd (3)Mandlikova Benjamin
1983 (2)Evert-Lloyd (3)Jaeger Jausovec Durie
1982 (1)Evert-Lloyd (2)Navratilova (5)Mandlikova (8)Jaeger
1981 (1)Evert-Lloyd (3)Jaeger (4)Mandlikova (6)Hanika
1980 (1)Evert-Lloyd (5)Fromholtz (7)Mandlikova (8)Ruzici
1979 (1)Evert-Lloyd (3)Fromholtz (4)Turnbull (7)Mariskova
1978 (1)Jausovec (2)Ruzici (3)Mariskova Simon
1977 (1)Jausovec (4)Mariskova (7)Newberry Mihai
1976* (1)Barker Tomanova Mihai Ruzici
1975* (1)Evert (2)Navratilova (co-3)Morozova (co-5)Newberry
1974* (1)Evert (co-3)Masthoff (co-3)Morozova Giscafre
1973 (1)Court (2)Evert (4)Goolagong (6)Durr
1972 (1)Goolagong (3)King (5)Durr (7)Masthoff
1971 (3)Goolagong (4)Richey Gourlay Scharr
1970 (1)Court (4)Heldman (7)Masthoff-Nies. Krantzcke
1969 (1)Court (3)Jones (4)Richey Turner
1968 (1)King (2)Jones (5)Richey (11)Du Plooy

*1974 - Draw featured two No.3 seeds (no No.4), two No.5 seeds (no No.6) and two No.7 seeds (no No.8)
*1975 - Draw featured two No.3 seeds (no No.4), and four No.5 seeds (no No.6, 7, or 8)
*1976 - Draw featured two No.3 seeds (no No.4), and four No.5 seeds (no No.6, 7, or 8)
DRAW FORMAT: 1968 - 96 Players; 1969 -80 - 64 Player Draw; 1981-2 - 96 Player Draw; 1983-Present - 128 Player Draw.

QUICKIE SEMIFINAL FACTS…
1983 The last time the No.1 did not reach the semifinals (Navratilova lost 4r to Horvath)
2001 The last time the No.2 did not reach the semifinals (V.Williams lost 1r to Schett)
2003 The last time the No.3 did not reach the semifinals (V.Williams lost 4r to Zvonareva)
2002 The last time the No.4 did not reach the semifinals (Clijsters lost 3r to C.Fernandez)
18 The number of unseeded players to have reached the semifinals since 1968 (only eight since 1978, and two since 1990 – C.Fernandez in 2002 and Petrova in 2003)
15 The lowest seed to reach the semifinals (No.15 MJ.Fernandez in 1989)
1 The number of times in the Open Era all Top 4 seeds reached the semifinals at this tournament (1992)
TOP OF PAGE


2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY NINE MEN’S NOTES
Tuesday 3 June 2003
Quarterfinals Bottom Half

Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 2 Andre Agassi (USA) v No. 7 Guillermo Coria (ARG)

SUZANNE LENGLEN: No. 4 Carlos Moya (ESP) v Martin Verkerk (NED)


On court today…

• Andre Agassi, on course to regain the No. 1 Entry Ranking if he reaches the final, plays his 999th career match against Guillermo Coria, bidding to become the fourth different Argentine to reach the Roland Garros semis in the Open Era.

• No. 4 seed Carlos Moya attempts to defeat a Dutchman for the first time in a meaningful match in one of tennis’s premier events, while Martin Verkerk attempts to become only the fifth man in the Open Era to reach the semifinals here in his first time playing Roland Garros.

COURT PHILIPPE CHATRIER

NO. 2 ANDRE AGASSI (USA) v NO. 7 GUILLERMO CORIA (ARG)

Head-to-head: Agassi leads 2-0
2002 Cincinnati Hard (O) R32 Agassi 60 62
2003 Australian Open Hard (O) R16 Agassi 61 31 ret.

Agassi and Coria met at this year’s Australian Open, with Coria having to retire because of severe calluses and a blister on his right foot. Coria, 21, is nearly 12 years younger than Agassi.

Agassi v Coria

33 Age 21
2 Entry Ranking 7
58 Titles 2
193-42 Career Grand Slam Record 13-7
Champion
1995/00/01/03
Aus Open
1999 Roland Garros
1992 Wimbledon
1994/99 US Open Best Grand Slam Result Quarterfinalist
2003 Roland Garros
51-13 Roland Garros Record 7-3
765-233 Career Record 82-44
146-50 Career Record – Clay 56-25
27-2 2003 Record 31-9
9-1 2003 Record – Clay 22-4
23-18 Career Five-Set Record 1-1
5 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
159-135 Career Tie-break Record 24-17
3-2 2003 Tie-break Record 7-3
8:40 Total Time on Court 11:32

• Agassi defeated Brazilian Flavio Saretta 62 61 75 in the round of 16 to advance to his ninth Roland Garros quarterfinal.

• Before that, Agassi defeated No. 26 seed Xavier Malisse 64 75 75 in the third round. He came back from two-sets-to-love down to defeat Mario Ancic 57 16 64 62 75 in the second round and defeated Karol Beck 62 63 63 in the first round.

• Agassi will regain the No. 1 position on the ATP Entry Ranking if he reaches the final, taking over from Lleyton Hewitt, who lost to Tommy Robredo in the third round here. Agassi first took the No. 1 ranking from Hewitt on 28 April when he reached the final at Houston, becoming the oldest man to hold the top spot. He lost it to the Australian again two weeks later after falling in the first round at TMS Rome.

• Against Argentines, Agassi is currently on a six-match winning streak in all tournaments, through his round of 16 defeat of Coria at this year’s Australian Open.

Agassi’s streak v Argentines
Event Player Score
2002 Scottsdale Juan Ignacio Chela Won 75 67 61 in QFs
2002 TMS Miami Agustin Calleri Won 63 62 in 2nd rd
2002 TMS Rome Agustin Calleri Won 76 75 in R16
2002 TMS Cincinnati Guillermo Coria Won 60 62 in 2nd rd
2002 TMS Paris Gaston Gaudio Won 64 67 64 in 2nd rd
2003 Aus Open Guillermo Coria Won 61 31 ret.


• Agassi has reached two new milestones with his wins here so far, first jumping ahead of Pete Sampras for career matches won and then going above Bjorn Borg for number of wins at Roland Garros. There is now another milestone looming for the 1999 champion: including his quarterfinal match, he is two matches away from his 1000th career match, which he would play here if he reaches the semifinals.

• With his win against Ancic in the second round, Agassi surpassed Pete Sampras for number of career matches won, and currently stands at 765 victories (from a total of 998 matches). This makes Agassi the winningest active player in men’s tennis and puts him in sixth place on the all-time list for the Open Era.

Open Era Match Win Leaders
Rank Player Career
win-loss Total matches
1. Jimmy Connors 1155-270 1425
2. Ivan Lendl 1068-242 1310
3. Guillermo Vilas 940-286 1226
4. John McEnroe 881-198 1079
5. Stefan Edberg 806-270 1076
6. Andre Agassi* 765-233 998
7. Pete Sampras* 762-222 984
8. Ilie Nastase 722-287 1009
9. Boris Becker 713-214 927
10. Michael Chang* 661-307 968
* denotes active players

• With his defeat of Saretta in the round of 16, Agassi won his 51st match at Roland Garros and jumped ahead of two-time Roland Garros champion Nicola Pietrangeli into sole possession of third place for most matches won here all-time. With his defeat of Malisse a round earlier, he had already gone ahead of six-times champion Bjorn Borg. Agassi will catch up with three-times winner Ivan Lendl if he reaches the final. 1977 Roland Garros champion Guillermo Vilas holds the record for most tournament matches won, with 56 won against 17 losses.

Roland Garros All-Time Match Win Leaders
Rank Player Total
Appearances Career
win-loss
1. Guillermo Vilas 18 56-17
2. Ivan Lendl 15 53-12
3. Andre Agassi 15 51-13
4. Nicola Pietrangeli 19 50-17
5. Bjorn Borg 8 49-2
6. Mats Wilander 12 47-9
7. Jaroslav Drobny 15 46-13
8. Budge Patty 15 44-14
9. Roy Emerson 13 43-11
Jan Kodes 15 43-13

• Agassi’s second round defeat of Ancic was his fifth comeback from two-sets-to-love down, Agassi’s last three have come at Roland Garros. In the 1999 final, he defeated Andrei Medvedev 16 26 64 63 64. Last year in the round of 16, he defeated Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu 46 36 63 63 63.

• The record for comebacks from two-sets-to-love down at Roland Garros in the Open Era is four, shared by American Harold Solomon and Frenchman Francois Jauffret. In addition to Agassi, Ronald Agenor and Jose Higueras also came back from two-sets-to-love down three times.

• The quarterfinals have been a barrier for Agassi for the last two years at Roland Garros. In 2002, as the No. 4 seed, Agassi lost to No. 11 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero 63 57 75 63; in 2001, he lost to Sebastien Grosjean 16 61 61 63.

• This is Agassi’s 15th appearance at Roland Garros, the second most after Michael Chang’s now 16 appearances. Both are among six former Roland Garros champions to start in the draw. Agassi won his title in 1999, defeating Andrei Medvedev as stated above. (Chang won his title in 1989.) Three of the former Roland Garros champions have advanced to the quarterfinals, Agassi being joined by 1998 champion Carlos Moya and 2002 champion Albert Costa.

• For the fourth time in his career, Agassi plays Roland Garros having won the first leg of the Grand Slam, the Australian Open. It is 11 years since a man won the Australian Open and Roland Garros back-to-back. This has been achieved 10 times in the history of the sport.

Australian Open/Roland Garros Double
1933 Jack Crawford
1938 Don Budge
1953 Ken Rosewall
1956 Lew Hoad
1962 Rod Laver
1963 Roy Emerson
1967 Roy Emerson
1969 Rod Laver
1988 Mats Wilander
1992 Jim Courier

• A win today would represent Agassi’s best Roland Garros result the same year as winning the Australian Open – he has twice been stopped at the quarterfinal stage after being champion in Melbourne.

Agassi at Roland Garros after Australian Open title
Year Roland Garros Finish
1995 Lost in QFs …to Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 63 75
2000 Lost in 2nd rd …to Karol Kucera 26 75 61 60
2001 Lost in QFs …to Sebastien Grosjean 16 61 61 63
2001 ??? ???

• Since Jim Courier won the Australian Open-Roland Garros double in 1992, the best result here for a reigning Australian Open champion is a runner-up finish – also achieved by Courier, in 1993. Agassi’s two Roland Garros quarterfinal finishes represent the furthest an Australian Open champion has advanced since then.

• Aside from the Australian Open/Roland Garros double, the last person to win back-to-back Grand Slam tournament titles was in fact Agassi, who in 1999/2000 won consecutive titles at the US Open and the Australian Open.

• Agassi leads the tour with four titles thus far in 2003, including the U.S. Clay Court Championships in Houston. (His other titles were on hard courts: the Australian Open, San Jose and TMS Miami.) While Houston is played on red clay, prior to Roland Garros, Agassi’s only other match this year on clay was at TMS Rome, where as defending champion he lost in the first round to David Ferrer 06 76 64, ending an 11-match winning streak.

• Coria advanced to his first Grand Slam quarterfinal by defeating countryman Mariano Zabaleta 64 76 57 67 63. At 4 hours 42 minutes, this was the longest match of the tournament to date and the first five-set victory of Coria’s career. The match was played over two days: Coria led by two sets to one when play was stopped after 2 hours 48 minutes due to bad light on Sunday night. It was finished on Monday after a further 1 hour 54 minutes.

• Coria defeated qualifier Attila Savolt 64 61 61 in the third round, Nicolas Kiefer 63 57 63 61 in the second round and Andre Sa 63 61 61 in the first (handing Sa his 16th consecutive loss).

• With his defeat of Zabaleta, Coria extended is streak of wins against fellow Argentines to 11 consecutive victories. For the whole of his career, he has lost only two matches at tour level against his countrymen, which puts his win-loss record at 16-2. Coria became Argentina’s No. 1 player after winning TMS Hamburg two weeks before Roland Garros, defeating countryman Agustin Calleri 63 64 64 in the final.

• Coria had his best Grand Slam finish before this event at the 2003 Australian Open, where he advanced to the round of 16. He defeated countryman Guillermo Canas 62 46 64 64 in the second round and Jarkko Nieminen 75 62 62 in the third round before retiring from his round of 16 match against Agassi trailing 16 13 in the second set because of calluses and blisters on his right foot.

• Against Americans, Coria has a career win-loss record of 6-4. This is only his second Grand Slam meeting with an American, after his loss to Agassi at the Australian Open.

• Coria is attempting to become the 5th different Argentine man in the Open Era to reach the semifinals of a Grand Slam tournament. Until David Nalbandian at 2002 Wimbledon, all of Coria’s predecessors had reached their first major semifinal at Roland Garros. Coria is now the 11th different Argentine man in the Open Era to reach the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam tournament, and the ninth to reach the quarters at Roland Garros.

• Of the eight previous Argentines who played Roland Garros quarterfinals, three have gone on to the semifinals: Guillermo Vilas, Jose Luis Clerc and Franco Squillari. These three account for a total of seven appearances by Argentines in the Roland Garros semis.

Argentines in Roland Garros quarterfinals


Player No. of QF
Appearances
(year of first appearance)

Best Finish
Guillermo Vilas 9 (1975) Won title 1977
Jose Luis Clerc 2 (1981) SFs 1981-82
Martin Jaite 1 (1985) --
Guillermo Perez-Roldan 1 (1988) --
Alberto Mancini 1 (1989) --
Franco Davin 1 (1991) --
Franco Squillari 1 (2000) SFs 2000
Guillermo Canas 1 (2002) --

• Coria, at 21 years 4 months, is the second-youngest player through to the quarterfinals at 2003 Roland Garros. (Tommy Robredo is almost four months younger.)

• This is Coria’s fourth appearance at Roland Garros. He had his best result to date last year, when he reached the third round before losing to eventual runner-up Juan Carlos Ferrero 62 63 63.

• Coria is playing his eighth Grand Slam overall and at No. 7 receives his highest seeding. He received a Grand Slam seeding once before at 2001 Wimbledon, where he was No. 29.

• Coria has won 18 of his last 21 matches, going back to the start of his spring clay court season. He is currently on a 10-match winning streak, having won TMS Hamburg just over a week ago. Coria was due to play at St Polten last week but withdrew before the start with a groin injury.

• This has been the best season of Coria’s career. The 21-year-old reached a career-high Entry Ranking of No. 7 on 19 May, thanks to his victory at TMS Hamburg, where he defeated Gaston Gaudio 63 67 60 in the semifinals and Agustin Calleri 63 64 64 in the final. Coria also reached finals on clay at TMS Monte Carlo (losing to Juan Carlos Ferrero 62 62) and at Buenos Aires (losing to Carlos Moya 63 46 64).

• Coria was Roland Garros junior champion in 1999, defeating David Nalbandian 64 63 in the boys’ final. As one of seven former junior champions who entered Roland Garros this year, he is attempting to become the first to capture the men’s singles title since 1981 junior champ Mats Wilander won his third men’s singles title here in 1988.


COURT SUZANNE LENGLEN

NO. 4 CARLOS MOYA (ESP) v MARTIN VERKERK (NED)

Head-to-head: first meeting

On broader terms, Moya’s career win-loss record against Dutchmen is a modest 9-8. Verkerk, however, has won only one match in six played against Spanish men. That lone victory was in the first round of 2002 Kitzbuhel, where Verkerk defeated Galo Blanco 75 67 64 in the first round. Also at 2002 Kitzbuhel, Verkerk then lost to Juan Carlos Ferrero 75 62 in the round of 16. He has since lost to Feliciano Lopez in the round of 16 at 2002 Tokyo and to Tommy Robredo in the first round of 2003 TMS Monte Carlo.

Moya v Verkerk

26 Age 24
4 Entry Ranking 46
13 Titles 1
49-26 Career Grand Slam Record 4-2
Champion
1998 Roland Garros Best Grand Slam Result Quarterfinalist
2003 Roland Garros
19-6 Roland Garros Record 4-0
360-196 Career Record 26-28
220-84 Career Record – Clay 14-11
36-10 2003 Record 18-14
27-6 2003 Record – Clay 10-6
12-13 Career Five-Set Record 1-0
4 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
133-106 Career Tie-break Record 10-11
12-11 2003 Tie-break Record 8-8
9:34 Total Time on Court 9:25

• Moya advanced to the quarterfinals of 2003 Roland Garros by ending his three-match losing streak to No. 13 seed Jiri Novak with a 75 63 62 victory in the round of 16, having defeated No. 21 Juan Ignacio Chela 62 63 36 26 63 in the third round, Mark Philippoussis in the second round for the second year running, this time winning 62 64 76, and lucky loser Filippo Volandri 76 46 62 63 in the first round.

• The only time before this match that Moya has faced a Dutchman in a Grand Slam tournament was at the 1996 US Open, where he lost in the second round to Jan Siemerink 76 64 64. Further acknowledging the Grand Slam tournaments and Davis Cup as the sport’s premier events, it is worth noting that Moya has won only one of three matches against Dutch players in these settings.

Moya v Dutchmen On the Grand Stage
Event Opponent Result
1996 US Open Jan Siemerink lost 76 64 64 in 2nd Rd.
2001 Davis Cup Sjeng Schalken lost 64 75 64 in 2nd rubber
Raemon Sluiter won 64 76 in dead fifth rubber

• This is Moya’s eighth appearance at Roland Garros. Last year here, he lost in the third round to Guillermo Canas 46 76 67 61 62.

• This is only the second time in his eight appearances at Roland Garros – all of them consecutive – that Moya has reached the quarterfinals. The only other time he advanced this far was in 1998 when he went on to win the Roland Garros men’s singles title.

• Moya is one of six former Roland Garros champions starting in the draw. (Two were Spanish, with defending champion Albert Costa being one of the other six.) He won the title in 1998, defeating No. 3 seed Marcelo Rios 61 26 62 64 in the quarterfinals, No. 15 Felix Mantilla 57 62 64 62 in the semifinals and No. 14 Alex Corretja 63 75 63 in the final.

• With Moya’s Roland Garros title having come five years ago, it is interesting to note that of the seven men who have won multiple Roland Garros titles in the Open Era, none has gone more than three years between titles. (The all-time tournament record for largest gap between tournament titles is 15 years, which is the amount of time between Ken Rosewall’s first title in 1953 and his last in 1968 at the dawn of the Open Era.)

How Long Can He Wait
Champion Titles Won Title Years Longest Gap Between Titles
Bjorn Borg 6 1974/75/78/79/80/81 3 yrs
Mats Wilander 3 1982/85/88 3 yrs
Ivan Lendl 3 1984/86/87 2 yrs
Gustavo Kuerten 3 1997/2000/01 3 yrs
Jan Kodes 2 1970/71 1 yr
Jim Courier 2 1991/92 1 yr
Sergi Bruguera 2 1993/94 1 yr

• Moya has won two titles so far this year: Buenos Aires, the second clay court event of the season, and Barcelona. At Buenos Aires, he defeated three-time Roland Garros champion Gustavo Kuerten 76 61 in the semifinals and Guillermo Coria 63 46 64 in the final. At Barcelona, Moya defeated Agustin Calleri 76 62 in the semifinals and Marat Safin in the final when Safin retired at 57 62 62 30 because of fatigue.

• The momentum with which Moya began the clay court season seemed to fade in the three weeks leading up to Roland Garros. Including TMS Miami, where he was runner-up, Moya had won 15 of 17 matches after capturing the Barcelona title. In three weeks before Roland Garros, taking in TMS Rome, TMS Hamburg and World Team Cup, Moya lost as many matches as he won, compiling a 4-4 record.

• Moya was 23-6 on clay ahead of 2003 Roland Garros, standing third on the list for most matches won on the surface this season, behind Agustin Calleri and Gaston Gaudio. Thanks to his performance to date here, Moya has now gone up to second place. Last year, Moya entered the tournament as the 2002 King of Clay, leading the list with a 19-5 record.
2003 Kings of Clay (through round of 16)
Rank Player Win-Loss
1 Gaston Gaudio (ARG) 28-10
2. Carlos Moya (ESP) 27-6*
3. Agustin Calleri (ARG) 24-9
4. Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) 25-2*
5. Guillermo Coria (ARG) 21-4*
*still active at 2003 Roland Garros

• Verkerk’s path to the quarterfinals at 2003 Roland Garros has been dotted with personal achievements. He won his first Grand Slam tournament match when he defeated Zeljko Krajan of Croatia 63 64 64 in the first round. He played and won the first five-set match of his career when he defeated Luis Horna 46 64 46 75 62 in the second round. He then defeated No. 29 seed Vince Spadea 57 64 62 75 in the third round and No. 11 Rainer Schuettler 63 63 75 in the fourth round.

• Verkerk has advanced to the quarterfinals of a major in only his third appearance in one. This is not particularly rare: 20 men have reached their first Grand Slam quarterfinal in their first Grand Slam tournament, 18 in their second, and 20 in their third major.

• Verkerk is the third different Dutchman to reach the Roland Garros quarterfinals in the Open Era, joining Tom Okker (1969, 73) and Richard Krajicek (1993, 96). Okker and Krajicek are also the only Dutchmen thus far to reach the semifinals here.

Going Dutch at Roland Garros
Year Player Quarterfinal Result Eventual finish
1969 Tom Okker defeated John Newcombe 57 62 46 62 62 SFs
1973 Tom Okker lost to Adriano Panatta 63 57 63 64 QFs
1993 Richard Krajicek defeated Karel Novacek 36 63 36 63 64 SFs
1996 Richard Krajicek lost to Yevgeny Kafelnikov 63 64 67 62 QFs
2003 Martin Verkerk v. Carlos Moya ???

• Verkerk has the chance to become the first unseeded player to reach the semifinals at Roland Garros since Franco Squillari at 2000 Roland Garros. In the Open Era, Roland Garros has seen 23 unseeded semifinalists. (see page 219 of the Roland Garros media guide).

• Verkerk is attempting to become the first player to reach the semifinals in his Roland Garros debut since Juan Carlos Ferrero in 2000. Only four players in the Open Era, including Ferrero, have advanced to the semifinals at Roland Garros in their first time playing the event.
First Roland Garros, First Semifinal
Year Player SF Result Final Result
1979 Vitas Gerulaitis lost to Bjorn Borg 62 61 60 Semifinalist
1982 Mats Wilander defeated Jose-Luis Clerc 75 62 16 75 Champion
1986 Mikael Pernfors defeated Henri Leconte 26 75 76 63 Runner-up
2000 Juan Carlos Ferrero lost to Gustavo Kuerten 75 46 26 64 63 Semifinalist

• If Verkerk were to defeat Moya, he would collect his first victory against a Top 5 player. The highest-ranked player Verkerk has defeated to this point in his career (encompassing only 28 events, not including Davis Cup, but including 2003 Roland Garros) is Andy Roddick, who was No. 6 when Verkerk beat him 67 63 64 in the second round of TMS Rome. (Verkerk advanced past then-No. 5 Tim Henman by walkover in the round of 16 at 2002 Indianapolis, but walkovers do not count toward win-loss records.)

• Prior to 2003 Roland Garros, Verkerk had played two Grand Slam events and lost in the first round of both. As a qualifier at the 2002 US Open, he fell to Andy Roddick 76 63 64. At this year’s Australian Open, he fell to Mark Philippoussis 64 64 67 63.

• Verkerk attempted to qualify for last year’s Roland Garros, and got to the third and final round of the qualifying tournament before losing in three sets to Frenchman Eric Prodon 57 63 63.

• Verkerk came into Roland Garros with a career-best Entry Ranking of No. 46. Having climbed 84 places last year, he continued his improvement into this season. He won his first singles title at Milan in February, defeating Ivan Ljubicic 36 75 76 in the semifinals and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 57 75 in the final, and performed well in the latter half of the European clay court season. Said Verkerk after winning on indoor carpet at Milan: “Before, I was saying that clay was my best surface, but it would be stupid to say it now.”

• Verkerk has now won 10 of his last 12 matches. He reached the semifinals last week at St Polten, falling to Nikolay Davydenko 75 61, and before that the quarters at TMS Rome, where Kafelnikov took revenge for Milan, defeating Verkerk 63 75.
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ROLAND GARROS
MEN’S REVIEW
Day Eight – 2 June 2003


Roland Garros Final Eight
Three of the six former Roland Garros champions who began the tournament remain in contention for the 2003 Roland Garros men’s singles title. All three – No. 2 seed Andre Agassi, No. 4 Carlos Moya and defending champion No. 9 Albert Costa – are attempting to win their second Roland Garros title. Three former champions is the most to play in the quarterfinals at Roland Garros in the Open Era, equalling the mark previously established achieved in 2001 (Agassi, Yevgeny Kafelnikov and Gustavo Kuerten) and 1987 (Ivan Lendl, Yannick Noah and Mats Wilander).

Costa and Moya also carry the distinction of joining No. 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero and No. 28 Tommy Robredo in making Spain the first nation to have four or more players in the quarterfinals at Roland Garros since Australia had five players (John Newcombe, Tony Roche, Ken Rosewall, Fred Stolle and eventual champion Rod Laver) in the final eight here in 1969. The last time any nation had four or more players in the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam event was at the 1995 US Open when the United States had five players (Andre Agassi, Michael Chang, Jim Courier, Patrick McEnroe and eventual champion Pete Sampras) in the quarters.

Player Nation Age Best Roland Garros
performance Best Grand Slam performance Clay Titles
(2) Andre Agassi USA 33 W-99 W-Australian Open 95, 00, 01, 03;
Roland Garros 99;
Wimbledon 92;
US Open 94, 99 7
(3) Juan Carlos Ferrero ESP 23 RU-02 RU-Roland Garros 02 7
(4) Carlos Moya ESP 26 W-98 W-Roland Garros 98 11
(7) Guillermo Coria ARG 21 QF-03 QF-Roland Garros 03 2
(9) Albert Costa ESP 27 W-02 W-Roland Garros 02 12
(19) Fernando Gonzalez CHI 22 QF-03 QF-Roland Garros 03;
US Open 02 3
(28) Tommy Robredo ESP 21 QF-03 QF-Roland Garros 03 1
Martin Verkerk NED 24 QF-03 QF-Roland Garros 03 0
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ROLAND GARROS – Paris-FRA
QUARTERFINAL MATCH NOTES,
Tuesday 3 June 2003


RUSSIANS STUN AMERICANS TO SET UP QUARTERFINAL SHOWDOWN
Russian rising stars Vera Zvonareva and Nadia Petrova have ousted Top 10 Americans Venus Williams and Jennifer Capriati respectively – both former world No.1s – to set up a quarterfinal showdown.

The 18-year-old Vera Zvonareva played the match of her life on Sunday to defeat world No.3 Williams and reach her first-ever Grand Slam quarterfinal. The No.22 seed, who won her debut WTA Tour singles title four weeks ago in Bol, Croatia, scored her second career Top 10 win (d. world No.10 Anastasia Myskina in Berlin 2r) and first over a Top 5 player with her 26 62 64 upset.

It marks the first time since the 2002 Australian Open (lost QF to Seles) that Venus has not reached a Grand Slam final, having fallen to sister Serena in the past four majors. It was the first time since 2001 Roland Garros that Venus has not advanced beyond the fourth round of a Grand Slam.

With Petrova’s upset win over 2001 champion and world No.7 Capriati on Sunday, Russia is guaranteed its first Grand Slam semifinalist since Elena Dementieva at the 2000 US Open. The 20-year-old Petrova meets compatriot Zvonareva in Tuesday’s quarterfinals, ensuring the first Russian semifinalist at Roland Garros since Olga Morozova in 1975.

Zvonareva and Petrova become the third and fourth Russian women in the Open Era to reach the Roland Garros quarterfinals, after Olga Morozova (1972/74/75) and Lina Krasnoroutskaya (2001). Coincidentally, it was here last year that Zvonareva met another No.3-seeded Williams sister in the Roland Garros fourth round, pushing eventual champion Serena to three sets. Zvonareva was ranked No.142 at the time – she is now No.21. Petrova is on the comeback trail after a left foot injury sidelined her for seven months last year. She is currently ranked No.76, but was as high as No.29 at the start of 2002.

THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING
For the first time in the Open Era at Roland Garros, two women from Russia (or the area formerly representing Russia) have advanced to the quarterfinals here and by virtue of the fact that they play each other, we will be guaranteed a Russian semifinalist. The following is a look at the other women to have reached the last four at any Grand Slam in the Open Era:

Grand Slam Year (Player) Round Reached
AUSTRALIAN OPEN 1975 Natasha Chmyreva Semifinals
ROLAND GARROS 1974 Olga Morozova
1975 Olga Morozova
2003 Petrova/Zvonareva Final
Semifinals
- TBD -
WIMBLEDON 1974 Olga Morozova
1997 Anna Kournikova Final
Semifinals
US OPEN 2000 Elena Dementieva Semifinals

WELCOME TO THE QUARTERS, AMÉLIE
World No.5 Amélie Mauresmo has thrilled her home crowd by reaching her first-ever Roland Garros quarterfinal. At her ninth attempt, the 23-year-old has broken through to the final eight, defeating Spaniard Magui Serna in the fourth round on Sunday. This is Mauresmo’s sixth career Grand Slam quarterfinal, having reached at least one quarterfinal at the other three majors.

Mauresmo has reached the semifinals at the past two Grand Slams she’s contested – 2002 Wimbledon and US Open, having missed the Australian Open in January due to a knee injury.

WELCOME BACK, CONCHITA
Spanish veteran Conchita Martinez is through to her 11th Roland Garros quarterfinal and first at a Grand Slam since 2001 Wimbledon. The 31-year-old former world No.2 reached the final eight after American Lindsay Davenport retired with a left toe strain trailing 64 20. Martinez is now 6-0 vs. Davenport in Grand Slams.

Apart from her 1994 Wimbledon win, and despite having never won here, Roland Garros has been Martinez’s most successful and consistent major, boasting a 61-15 win/loss record. Martinez, who missed half of 2001 with an Achilles tendon injury, has been making a steady rise up the rankings. She is currently at No.22, her highest rank since September 2001 after falling as low as No.74 in July last year.


SEEDS IN GRAND SLAM QUARTERFINALS
On only seven occasions in 141 Grand Slams in the Open Era have the Top 8 women’s seeds advanced to the singles quarterfinals. The last time this occurred at a major was here in 1993, when seeds No.1 through No.8 (1-Graf, 2-Sánchez-Vicario, 3-Sabatini, 4-Martinez, 5-Fernandez, 6-Capriati, 7-Novotna, 8-Huber) advanced to the final eight at Roland Garros.

Below is a look at the number of Top 8 seeds that have reached the singles quarterfinals at Grand Slams in the Open Era:

Year Australian French Wimbledon US Year Australian French Wimbledon US
1968 N/A* 5 7 6 1986 Not held 6 4 5
1969 7 6 6 7 1987 6 6 7 6
1970 6 6 5 6 1988 6 3 5 5
1971 4 3 5 4 1989 5 4 4 8
1972 7 5 7 5 1990 4 5 6 5
1973 7 5 8 6 1991 6 7 6 7
1974 5 5 6 6 1992 5 6 5 4
1975 5 5 7 5 1993 6 8 6 3
1976 5 2 8 3 1994 6 3 3 6
1977 3 (Jan) 7 (Dec) 5 8 5 1995 5 4 6 4
1978 3 4 5 4 1996 5 5 3 4
1979 5 5 8 6 1997 1 4 4 4
1980 6 6 6 3 1998 5 6 6 6
1981 8 7 7 5 1999 5 5 5 6
1982 5 5 3 6 2000 2 6 5 6
1983 6 4 2 5 2001 6 3 6 6
1984 4 4 6 4 2002 7 5 5 5
1985 6 5 5 7 2003 6 5 TBD TBD
*The Open Era began in April 1968, after the staging of the 1968 Australian Open


SERENA CLOSING IN
Serena Williams has not lost a singles match at a Grand Slam since the 2001 US Open final when her sister Venus came through 62 64. Since then Serena has won the last four Grand Slam tournaments she has entered since Roland Garros 2002, and her current Grand Slam match win-streak stands at 32 – sixth in the Open Era.


PLAYER GS MATCH
WIN-STREAK
CONSECUTIVE GRAND SLAM TITLES
RUN ENDED
Martina NAVRATILOVA 45 6 – 1983 Wim, US, Aus, 1984 RG, Wim, US 1984 Aus Open SF
Steffi GRAF 45 6 – 1995 RG, Wim, US; 1996 RG, Wim, US 1997 Aus Open 4r
Monica SELES 41 5 – 1991 Aus, RG; US, 1992 Aus, RG 1992 Wim. Final
Steffi GRAF 40 5 – 1988 Aus, RG, Wim, US; 1989 Aus 1989 RG Final
Margaret COURT 35 6 – 1969 US, 1970 Aus, RG, Wim, US, 1971 Aus 1971 RG 3r
Serena WILLIAMS 32* 4 – 2002 RG, Wim, US, 2003 Aus ???
Billie Jean KING 31 5 – 1971 US; 1972 RG, Wim, US; 1973 Wim 1973 US 3r


COMING BACK FOR SECONDS
Defending champion Serena Williams is through to the quarterfinals, the 25th time in the Open Era a reigning champion has advanced at least that far. In fact, on only three occasions has the defending champion fallen before the quarterfinals:

1971 Margaret Court l. to Gail Sherriff-Chanfreau in the Round of 16
1983 Martina Navratilova l. to Kathy Horvath in the Round of 16
1990 Arantxa Sánchez-Vicario l. to Mercedes Paz in the Round of 64

There have been seven times the title winner has not come back the following year to defend her title (1973-King, 1974-Court, 1976-Evert, 1977-Barker, 1993-Seles, 2000-Graf and 2001-Pierce).

GRAND SLAM QUARTERFINAL HISTORIES

Player Total QF* Last QF Appearance Notes
[1] S.Williams 12 2003 Australian Open On 32-match Grand Slam win streak, taking in last four majors
[2] Clijsters 6 2003 Australian Open Has reached QF at all four Grand Slams at least once
[4] Henin-Hardenne 6 2003 Australian Open Aiming to overtake Venus Williams for the No.3 WTA Ranking
[5] Mauresmo 6 2002 US Open First time to reach quarterfinals at home Grand Slam
[8] Rubin 4 2000 Roland Garros Third Roland Garros quarterfinal appearance
[22] Zvonareva 1 Debut Betters her 2002 Roland Garros performance by one round
[24] Martinez 23 2001 Wimbledon Her 11th time in 14 years to reach Roland Garros quarterfinals
Petrova 1 Debut Twice beaten in the fourth round – 2001 Roland Garros and Wimbledon
* Includes 2003 Roland Garros


CAREER GRAND SLAM QUARTERFINAL RECORDS*
Player Australian Open Roland Garros Wimbledon US Open Total
[1] Serena Williams 1-1 1-1 2-1 3-1 7-4
[2] Kim Clijsters 2-0 1-0 0-1 0-1 3-2
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 1-1 1-0 2-0 0-0 4-1
[5] Amélie Mauresmo 1-1 First 1-0 1-1 3-2
[8] Chanda Rubin 1-0 0-2 0-0 0-0 1-2
[22] Vera Zvonareva 0-0 First 0-0 0-0 Debut
[24] Conchita Martinez 3-2 4-6 3-1 2-1 12-10
Nadia Petrova 0-0 First 0-0 0-0 Debut
* Does not include results from Roland Garros 2003


CAREER RECORDS AT ROLAND GARROS
Player Career Win-Loss Record at Roland Garros*
[1] Serena Williams 20-3
[2] Kim Clijsters 12-3
[4] Justine Henin-Hardenne 10-3
[5] Amélie Mauresmo 13-8
[8] Chanda Rubin 20-8
[22] Vera Zvonareva 7-1
[24] Conchita Martinez 61-15
Nadia Petrova 7-2
* Includes main draw matches only and 2003 results at Roland Garros


BLOODY SUNDAY
For only the fourth time in 10 years at a Grand Slam, three of the Top 8 seeds fell at the fourth round stage. The following is a look at the previous Grand Slams where this occurred:

2003 ROLAND GARROS No.3 VENUS WILLIAMS l. to (22) V. Zvonareva
No.6 LINDSAY DAVENPORT l. to (24) C. Martinez
No.7 JENNIFER CAPRIATI l. to N. Petrova
2000 AUSTRALIAN OPEN No.3 SERENA WILLIAMS l. to (16) E. Likhovtseva
No.4 MARY PIERCE l. to A. Sugiyama
No.6 BARBARA SCHETT l. to (13) A. Sánchez-Vicario
1997 AUSTRALIAN OPEN* No.1 STEFFI GRAF l. to (12) A. Coetzer
No.3 CONCHITA MARTINEZ l. to (16) S. Appelmans
No.5 ANKE HUBER l. to M. Pierce
No.7 LINDSAY DAVENPORT l. to K. Po
1993 US OPEN No.3 MARTINA NAVRATILOVA l. to (12) H. Sukova
No.4 CONCHITA MARTINEZ l. to (11) Man.Maleeva
No.8 JANA NOVOTNA l. to K. Date

* Incredibly, all four of these upsets occurred in the top half of the Australian Open draw on Sunday 20 January, 1997

QUARTERFINAL MATCH-UPS

(1) SERENA WILLIAMS (USA #1) vs. (5) AMÉLIE MAURESMO (FRA #5)
Head-to-Head: Williams leads 5-1
Last Meeting: 2003 Rome (Red Clay/Outdoors), SF, Mauresmo won 16 75 63

S.Williams Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: 22 WTA Tour career prize money: $11,332,679

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fifth appearance; in 1998 debut held 64 52 lead on eventual winner Sánchez-Vicario; in 2001, extended eventual winner Capriati to 3s in QF; won title last year, d. world No.1 Capriati and No.2 V.Williams en route
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 5)
WINNER (3): Australian Open, Paris Indoors, Miami; FINALIST (1): Charleston; SEMIFINALIST (1): Rome
• Started season by winning her first 21 matches in three-title sweep of Australian Open (d. Clijsters in SF, saving 2 mp and V.Williams in final in 3s to complete non-calendar year Grand Slam), Paris Indoors (d. Mauresmo in final) and Miami (d. Capriati in final in 3s); winning streak ended in Charleston final, l. to Henin-Hardenne, her first loss since falling to another Belgian, Clijsters, in season-ending Championships final in November; represented USA in Fed Cup World Group 1r tie vs. Czech Republic, winning both singles rubbers and partnering Venus to win doubles; semifinalist in Rome falling to Mauresmo in 3s after serving for the match leading 61 54; first losses at consecutive tournaments since Charleston-Berlin 2002
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 22 WTA Tour singles titles, including the past four Grand Slams, becoming only the fifth woman in history to hold all four major singles crowns at one time; winner of 2002 Roland Garros, Wimbledon and US Open and 2003 Australian Open, d. sister Venus in each final; in winner of 11 doubles titles, six of those Grand Slams (all w/Venus and at least one at each Grand Slam); attained world No.1 ranking on 8 July 2002 by reaching Wimbledon final, replacing Venus in the top spot; has been ranked No.1 ever since
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 (8 July 2002 – present)
• Coached by her father, Richard Williams and mother, Oracene Price; here with trainer Kerrie Brooks and hitting partner Jovan Savic

Mauresmo Quick Facts
Age: 23 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,557,136

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Ninth consecutive appearance in here; best result was reaching 4r last year (falling to Suarez in 3s) and 2002 (losing to Seles)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 7)
WINNER (1): Warsaw; FINALIST (2): Paris Indoors, Rome; SEMIFINALIST (2): Dubai, Berlin; QUARTERFINALIST (1): Indian Wells
• Missed four months due to right knee cartilage inflammation returning at Paris [Indoors], reaching final, d. Dementieva 60 60 before l. to S.Williams; withdrew from Antwerp due to left adductor strain; semifinalist at Dubai as defending champion, retiring to Seles trailing 36 22 due to a right adductor strain; seeded No.5 at Indian Wells, reached QF and scheduled to play No.4 seed Davenport but pulled out with an acute throat infection; seeded No.8, reached 4r at Miami, l. to No.12 seed Rubin; representing France in Fed Cup World Group 1r vs. Colombia, d. Zuluaga and Castaño to guide her country into QF; collected ninth Tour singles title and first of 2003 at Warsaw as No.2 seed; in final, scored first win over V.Williams in six meeting when Williams retired trailing 67(6) 60 30 with a left abdominal strain; SF in Berlin falling to eventual champion Henin-Hardenne; reached third Italian Open final in four years d. Capriati and S.Williams (first win in five meetings) after Williams was two points from victory; fell to Clijsters in 3s final and after her ranking returned to Top Five for only ninth week of her career (May-June 2001, September-October 2002)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of nine WTA Tour career singles titles, most recently at 2003 Warsaw and incl. 2000 Sydney, d. Top 3 seeds (No.3 Pierce, No.2 Davenport, No.1 Hingis) and 2001 German Open (d. Capriati and Hingis back-to-back for her fourth title in five events); unseeded, runner-up at 1999 Australian Open, d. world No.1 Davenport in SF before falling to No.2 Hingis; also a semifinalist at 2002 Wimbledon and US Open (d. No.3 Capriati on both occasions); winner of one Tour doubles title at 2000 Linz (w/Rubin); member of French Fed Cup Team in 1998-99 and 2001-03
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.4 (7-27 October 2002)
• Coached by Loic Courteau since Rome 2002

(2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2) vs. (24) CONCHITA MARTINEZ (ESP #22)
Head-to-Head: Clijsters leads 2-1
Last Meeting: 2003 Indian Wells (Hard/Outdoors), SF, Clijsters won 63 62

Clijsters Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 12 WTA Tour career prize money: $4,802,349

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fourth consecutive appearance in this event; finalist in 2001, d. compatriot Henin-Hardenne in 3s SF the day before her 18th birthday; was four times just two points from winning title before falling to Capriati 16 64 1210 in longest third set to a women’s final in the tournament’s history; surprise 3r loser to C. Fernandez as the No.4 seed last year
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Rome; FINALIST (3): Antwerp, Scottsdale, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (2): Australian Open, Miami
• Reached SF or better at all eight tournaments, her most consistent start to a season; started 2003 by winning Sydney to become only fourth player in last 20 years (Graf, Seles and Navratilova) to win three or more consecutive titles without loss of a set (2002 Luxembourg and Championships) and continued to Australian Open SF where she led 51 third set and held 2 mp at 52 vs. world No.1 and eventual champion S.Williams before falling 46 63 75; on home soil, reached Antwerp final, d. No.4 Henin-Hardenne in SF (l. to V.Williams); finalist in Scottsdale, serving for the match vs. Sugiyama before falling in 3s; collected career-first Tier I singles title at Indian Wells as No.1 seed, d. Davenport in final; extended win streak to 10 by reaching Miami SF (l. to S.Williams); on 14 April, ascended to world No.2 WTA Ranking, the sixth youngest to do so (after Jaeger, Hingis, Austin, Seles and Graf); in Berlin, scored her first win over Capriati and held 3 mp in final vs. Henin-Hardenne before falling 64 46 75; won second Tier I title of the season in Rome, avenging Scottsdale loss to Sugyiama and d. Mauresmo in the final after Mauresmo served for the match leading 63 65; in doubles, has won three titles to date (all w/Sugiyama) at Sydney, Antwerp and Scottsdale
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Rome; first title came at 1999 Luxembourg as a qualifier; runner-up at 2001 Roland Garros, d. Henin-Hardenne in SF after trailing 62 42 and in final, was two points from victory vs. Capriati on four occasions before falling 16 64 1210, featuring the longest third set in a Roland Garros women’s singles final; also semifinalist at 2002 and 2003 Australian Opens; member of the Belgian Fed Cup Team 2000-03, helping her country win its first-ever title in 2001; winner of seven Tour doubles titles; mixed doubles runner-up at 2000 Wimbledon (w/Hewitt)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.2 (14 April – 5 May, 12 May 2003 – present)
• Coached by Marc Dehous since July 2002; physical trainer is Eveline Coppens

Martinez Quick Facts
Age: 31 WTA Tour career singles titles: 32 WTA Tour career prize money: $10,311,455

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her 16th appearance; best result was reaching the final in 2000 (third career Grand Slam final) beating countrywoman and former three-time winner Sánchez-Vicario in SF for first time in five years; reached SF in 1994 –96, losing to eventual champion each time; 2001 was first time not to advance to at least 4r since 1988; l. in 2r last year to Dokic in 3s
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 10)
SEMIFINALIST (1): Indian Wells; QUARTERFINALIST (3): Doha, Dubai, Rome
• Started season with consecutive 1r losses at Sydney and Australian Open, before reaching QF of Doha and Dubai; reached SF at Indian Wells (l. to Clijsters) before falling in 2r of Sarasota to Molik; reached Charleston 3r (l. to S.Williams) before winning a singles rubber (d. Pratt) in Spain’s victory over Australia in Fed Cup World Group 1r tie in Tarragona; upset in 1r Berlin by wildcard Weingärtner; eliminated world No.10 Dokic and No.9 Hantuchova en route to Rome QF (l. to S.Williams), scoring two Top 10 wins at a tournament for first time since 1997 Stanford; l. 1r Madrid to Black
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 32 WTA Tour singles titles (20 on clay) and 10 doubles titles; Grand Slam champion at Wimbledon in 1994 (d. nine-time former champion Navratilova in final); also runner-up at 1998 Australian Open (d. No.2 Davenport) and 2000 Roland Garros (l. to Pierce); last singles title came at 2000 German Open (d. No.1 Hingis); for 12 consecutive years (1989-2000) qualified for season-ending Championships in singles and finished inside the Top 15; has career wins over Graf, Seles, Sánchez-Vicario and Capriati; member of the Spanish Fed Cup Team 1988-96, 1998, 2000-03 and the Spanish Olympic Team 1992, 1996 and 2000
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.2 (30 October 1995 – 14 April 1996; 29 April – 5 May, 20 May – 4 August 1996)
• Coached by Patricia Tarabini

(4) JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE (BEL #4) vs. (8) CHANDA RUBIN (USA #8)
Head-to-Head: Henin-Hardenne leads 3-2
Last Meeting: 2003 Miami (Hard/Outdoors), QF, Rubin won 63 62

Henin-Hardenne Quick Facts
Age: 20 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,171,138

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her fourth appearance here; semifinalist in 2001, holding a 62 42 lead on compatriot Clijsters before falling in 3s; last year as No.5 seed was suffering from bronchitis and fell 1r to qualifier Kapros in 3s; right elbow injury prevented her from taking part in 2000; in 1999 2r, almost stunned world No.2 Davenport on Court Central before falling 75 final set
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Dubai, Charleston, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (4): Sydney, Australian Open, Antwerp, Amelia Island
• Began season as semifinalist in Sydney (losing to eventual winner Clijsters 62 63) and Australian Open, surviving marathon 4r vs. Davenport in second longest match (in terms of total games played) played there from 4r on in the Open Era, winning 75 57 97 before being halted by world No.2 V.Williams in SF; in Antwerp, reached SF, falling to compatriot Clijsters 62 76(3) after trailing 5-2 second set; won title at Dubai as top seed, d. No.3 seed Capriati in SF and No.4 seed Seles in F; reached QF in Miami falling to Rubin; scored first ever-win over a world No.1 when she ended Serena Williams unbeaten 21-0 run in 2003 in the final of Charleston on April 13; fell in SF Amelia Island as top seed to Dementieva after holding a mp; joined Graf as only second player in Berlin tournament’s history to retain the German Open d. Mauresmo (saving sp in first set) and Clijsters (saving 3 mp in third set)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of nine WTA Tour singles titles and two doubles titles; runner-up at 2001 Wimbledon and semifinalist at 2001 Roland Garros, 2002 Wimbledon and 2003 Australian Open; one of only four current players (along with Clijsters, Seles & Davenport) to have wins over S.Williams, V.Williams and Capriati; in 1999, won Antwerp in her Tour debut, becoming the fifth player at that stage to achieve that feat; member of Belgian Fed Cup team 2000-03 (winning title in 2001)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.4 (28 October – 10 November 2002, 27 January 2003 - present)
• Coached by Carlos Rodriguez since 1996

Rubin Quick Facts
Age: 27 WTA Tour career singles titles: 6 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,528,013

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Ninth appearance in main draw at this event; best result was reaching QF in 1995 (scoring one of the greatest French Open comebacks to oust No.5 seed Novotna after trailing 0-5, 0-40 third set) and again in 2000 (d. Tauziat)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 9)
WINNER (1): Madrid; SEMIFINALIST (4): Tokyo [Pan Pacific], Miami; QUARTERFINALIST (2): Sydney, Indian Wells
• Reached Sydney QF as No.7 seed before falling to Clijsters; as No.10 seed, reached 4r at Australian Open for first time in four years (l. to Myskina in 3s); reached SF at Tokyo [Pan Pacific], l. to eventual runner-up Seles, 46 64 62; l. 2r at Scottsdale losing to Granville; reached QF at Indian Wells (d. Sugiyama in 3s before falling to eventual champion Clijsters) and moved back into the Top 10 for first time since October 6, 1996; SF in Miami – best result there in seven years upsetting both world No.7 Mauresmo and No.4 Henin-Hardenne for the loss of just seven games before falling to Capriati; upset in her opening round matches at Berlin and Rome before rebounding to win her sixth career WTA Tour singles title last week in Madrid, d. Sanchez Lorenzo in final in 3s
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of five WTA Tour singles titles, including two biggest titles in 2002 at Eastbourne and Los Angeles (d. No.1 S.Williams, No.5 Dokic and No.9 Davenport); runner-up nine times, including 1996 Miami; best Grand Slam result was SF finish at 1996 Australian Open, where she led eventual champion Seles 5-2 third set before falling; quarterfinalist at 1995 and 2000 Roland Garros; has qualified for Tour Championships in singles three times (1995, 2000 and 2002); a member of the US Fed Cup team 1995-97, 1999 and the US Olympic team in 1996; in doubles, winner of 10 titles, including one Grand Slam at 1996 Australian Open (w/Sánchez-Vicario)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.6 (8 April – 9 June 1996)
• Coached by Benny Sims since May 1998

(22) VERA ZVONAREVA (RUS #21) vs. NADIA PETROVA (RUS #76)
Head-to-Head: First meeting

Zvonareva Quick Facts
Age: 18 WTA Tour career singles titles: 1 WTA Tour career prize money: $335,972

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her second appearance here; qualified last year for first appearance and reached 3r before falling to eventual champion S.Williams in 3s (46 60 61)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 13)
WINNER (1): Bol; SEMIFINALIST (1): Strasbourg; QUARTERFINALIST (5): Auckland, Hobart, Indian Wells, Charleston, Berlin
• Began season by reaching QF in Auckland defeating No.3 seed Panova in 1r before falling to eventual finalist Cho; reached QF again the following week in Hobart falling to eventual champion Molik; Lost 1r at the Australian Open; reached 2r in Memphis and 1r in Scottsdale to No.6 seed Daniilidou; reached first Tier I QF at Indian Wells d. Shaughnessy in 3s before l. to No.2 seed Capriati; l. 1r Miami to Chladkova; reached her second Tier 1 QF of the year in Charleston d. 2002 finalist and No.8 seed Schnyder in 2r, l. to No.3 seed Davenport; fell 2r at Amelia Island in 3s to Coetzer; won her first career WTA Tour title in Bol as No.3 seed, d. Martinez Granados in final; the following week in Berlin, reached the QF d. en route No.9 seed Myskina and No.12 seed Daniilidou before falling to eventual champion Henin-Hardenne; last week in Strasbourg, reached SF, falling to Sprem
CAREER IN REVIEW
• 2002 breakthrough year; qualified for Bol and defeated No.8 seed Srebotnik en-route to first QF; reached first SF following week in Warsaw; qualified and reached 4r at Roland Garros in Grand Slam debut extending eventual champion Serena Williams to 3s; reached first final at Palmero falling in 3 hour final to Diaz-Oliva; also reached Sopot SF upsetting No.7 seed Matevzic en route; reached 3r at US Open taking first set off Clijsters before falling; has won 3 ITF titles and the Orange Bowl Under 18s in 2000 and 2001
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.21 (26 June 2003 - present)
• Coached by Julia Kashevarova

Petrova Quick Facts
Age: 20 WTA Tour career singles titles: none WTA Tour career prize money: $790,780

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making third appearance here; reached 4r in 2001 before falling to S.Williams
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
THIRD ROUND (2): Australian Open, Rome
• Playing her ninth Tour event of 2003, sixth in the main draw; started season by qualifying for Gold Coast, reaching 2r before falling to No.4-seeded compatriot Bovina in 3s; after withdrawing from Canberra with right shoulder, strain, reached 3r at Australian Open for second time, d. No.21 seed Sugiyama in 2r before falling to No.12 seed Schnyder in 3s; after losing 1r at Tokyo [Pan Pacific] to Krasnoroutskaya in 3s, failed to qualify for Indian Wells and Miami; qualified for Sarasota, d. Likhovtseva 1r before retiring against eventual champion Myskina at opening of third set with right ankle sprain; retired in 2r of Amelia Island qualifying with same injury; in Berlin, reached 2r before falling to No.12 seed Daniilidou in 3s; in Rome, reached 3r (when Seles retired) and stretched No.5 seed Capriati 75 63
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of four ITF Women’s Circuit singles titles (one in 1997 and three in 1998); reached career-first Grand Slam round of 16s at 2001 Roland Garros and Wimbledon; twice a WTA Tour semifinalist, at 2001 Amelia Island (l. to world No.10 Coetzer in 3s) and 2002 Gold Coast (l. to V.Williams); winner of three Tour doubles titles – 2001 ’s-Hertogenbosch (w/Dragomir Ilie) and Linz (w/Dokic) and 2002 Linz (w/Dokic); a member of the Russian Fed Cup Team in 2001
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.29 (7-13 January 2002)
• Coached by Glen Schaap

ROLAND GARROS QUARTERFINAL HISTORY
Below is a complete list of all Roland Garros quarterfinalists in the Open Era (1968-present). In 1968, there was a 96-player draw with 16 seeds. Between 1969-77 only eight players were seeded in the 64 singles draw; 16 seeds in a 64 player draw from 1978-80, 16 seeds in a 96 player draw from 1981-82, before changing to the former format of 16 seeds and a 128 draw in 1983. The number of seeds was expanded to 32 in 2002. (Names in Italics type advanced to the semifinals; Italics Underlined type advanced to the finals, Bold type denotes winners)

2003 (1)S.Williams (2)Clijsters (4)Henin-H (5)Mauresmo (8)Rubin (22)Zvonareva (24)Martinez Petrova
2002 (1)Capriati (2)V.Williams (3)S. Williams (6)Seles (7)Dokic C.Fernandez Pierce Suarez
2001 (1)Hingis (4)Capriati (6)S.Williams (12)Clijsters (14)Henin Krasnoroutskaya Schiavone (Q)Mandula
2000 (1)Hingis (3)Seles (4)V.Williams (5)Martinez (6)Pierce (8)Sanchez-V. Rubin (Q)Marrero
1999 (1)Hingis (2)Davenport (3)Seles (6)Graf (7)Sanchez-V. Martinez Plischke (Q)Schwartz
1998 (1)Hingis (2)Davenport (3)Novotna (4)Sanchez-V. (6)Seles (8)V.Williams (10)Majoli Schnyder
1997 (1)Hingis (2)Graf (3)Seles (6)Sanchez-V. (9)Majoli (11)Coetzer (12)MJ.Fernandez Dragomir
1996 (Co-1)Graf (Co-1)Seles (3)Martinez (4)Sanchez-V. (5)Majoli (9)Davenport (10)Novotna Habsudova
1995 (1)Sanchez-V. (2)Graf (4)Martinez (8)Sabatini (9)Date (12)Majoli Ruano-Pascual Rubin
1994 (1)Graf (2)Sanchez-V. (3)Martinez (12)Pierce (16)Hack Gorrochategui Halard Coetzer
1993 (1)Graf (2)Sanchez-V. (3)Sabatini (4)Martinez (5)MJ.Fernandez (6)Capriati (7)Novotna (8)Huber
1992 (1)Seles (2)Graf (3)Sabatini (4)Sanchez-V. (5)Capriati (7)Martinez Zvereva Bollegraf
1991 (1)Seles (2)Graf (3)Sabatini (4)MJ.Fernandez (5)Sanchez-V. (6)Novotna (7)Martinez (13)Tauziat
1990 (1)Graf (2)Seles (6)Man.Maleeva (7)MJ.Fernandez (8)K.Maleeva (9)Martinez (11)Novotna Capriati
1989 (1)Graf (6)Man.Maleeva (7)Sanchez (8)Martinez (10)Kelesi (11)Novotna (15)MJ.Fernandez Seles
1988 (1)Graf (4)Sabatini (6)Sukova (13)Zvereva Fulco Kelesi Provis Sanchez
1987 (1)Navratilova (2)Graf (3)Evert-Lloyd (6)Man.Maleeva (7)Sabatini (8)Kohde-Kilsch (14)Reggi Sanchez
1986 (1)Navratilova (2)Evert-Lloyd (3)Graf (5)Mandlikova (6)Sukova (7)Rinaldi (13)Bassett MJ.Fernandez
1985 (1)Navratilova (2)Evert-Lloyd (3)Mandlikova (4)Man.Maleeva (7)Kohde-Kilsch Sabatini(14) Cecchini Phelps
1984 (1)Navratilova (2)Evert-Lloyd (3)Mandlikova (8)Horvath (13)Bonder (15)Bassett Brown Benjamin
1983 (2)Evert-Lloyd (3)Jaeger (4)Austin (8)Mandlikova Jausovec Horvath Durie Rush
1982 (1)Evert-Lloyd (2)Navratilova (3)Austin (5)Mandlikova (8)Jaeger (11)Ruzici Romanov Garrison
1981 (1)Evert-Lloyd (2)Navratilova (3)Jaeger (4)Mandlikova (5)Ruzici (6)Hanika (7)Jausovec Rinaldi
1980 (1)Evert-Lloyd (2)King (3)Turnbull (5)Fromholtz (6)K.Jordan (7)Mandlikova (8)Ruzici Madruga
1979 (1)Evert-Lloyd (3)Fromholtz (4)Turnbull (5)Ruzici (7)Mariskova Mandlikova Tomanova Gerulitis
1978 (1)Jausovec (2)Ruzici (3)Mariskova (5)May (13)Bonicelli Masthoff Simon Bendlova
1977 (1)Jausovec (2)May (4)Mariskova (5)Tomanova (7)Newberry Teeguarden Mihai Boshoff
1976* (1)Barker (2)Masthoff Mariskova Tomanova Mihai Kuykendall Holubova Ruzici
1975* (1)Evert (2)Navratilova (co-3)Morozova (co-5)Giscafre (co-5)Newberry Ganz Szabo Sawamatsu
1974* (1)Evert (co-3)Masthoff (co-3)Morozova (co-5)Navratilova (co-7)Heldman Giscafre Ebbinghaus Neumanova
1973 (1)Court (2)Evert (4)Goolagong (6)Durr (7)Masthoff De Roubin Navratilova Ebbinghaus
1972 (1)Goolagong (3)King (5)Durr (7)Masthoff Wade Morozova Ebbinghaus Molesworth
1971 (3)Goolagong (4)Richey (6)Durr Turner-Bowrey Gourlay Chanfreau-Lov. Scharr Tuero
1970 (1)Court (2)King (3)Wade (4)Heldman (7)Masthoff-N (8)Casals Krantzcke Vopickova
1969 (1)Court (2)King (3)Jones (4)Richey (5)Heldman (8)Melville Casals Turner
1968 (1)King (2)Jones (5)Richey (7)Vopickova (8)Bueno (11)Du Plooy (13)Subirats (14)Sherriff-Lovera

*1974 - Draw featured two No.3 seeds (no No.4), two No.5 seeds (no No.6) and two No.7 seeds (no No.8)
*1975 - Draw featured two No.3 seeds (no No.4), and four No.5 seeds (no No.6, 7, or 8)
*1976 - Draw featured two No.3 seeds (no No.4), and four No.5 seeds (no No.6, 7, or 8)

DRAW FORMAT: 1968 - 96 Players; 1969 -80 - 64 Player Draw; 1981-2 - 96 Player Draw; 1983-Present - 128 Player Draw.

QUICKIE QUARTERS FACTS...
1983 The last time the No.1 did not reach the quarterfinals (No.1 Navratilova lost to Horvath)
2001 The last time the No.2 did not reach the quarterfinals (No.2 V. Williams lost 1r to Schett)
2003 The last time the No.3 did not reach the quarterfinals (V.Williams lost 4r to Zvonareva - not including 2001 withdrawal of Davenport)
1999 The last time the No.4 did not reach the quarterfinals (Novotna lost 4r to Plischke)
41 Unseeded players have reached the quarterfinals since 1981
15 The lowest seed to reach the semifinals (No.15 MJ.Fernandez in 1989 and Bassett in 1984)
1 The number of times in the Open Era all top eight seeds reached the quarterfinals at this tournament (1993)
2 The number of times there were only two seeded players (1-16), or less in the quarterfinals (1976)
3 The number of times a Qualifier has reached the quarterfinals (1999 Schwartz, 2000 Marrero & 2001 Mandula)
TOP OF PAGE


2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY EIGHT MEN’S NOTES
Monday 2 June 2003
Round of 16 Top Half


Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez (CHI) v No. 30 Jarkko Nieminen (FIN)
No. 9 Albert Costa (ESP) v. No. 32 Arnaud Clement (FRA)

SUZANNE LENGLEN: No. 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) v No. 20 Felix Mantilla (ESP)
No. 15 Gustavo Kuerten (BRA) v No. 28 Tommy Robredo (ESP)


On court today…

• A Chilean and a Finn meet for the first time in a Grand Slam tournament, with No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez and No. 30 Jarkko Nieminen attempting to further their career-best Roland Garros efforts.

• Marathon man Albert Costa and Arnaud Clement reprise their recent meeting at Rome, Costa having won that match four weeks ago and their only other meeting five years ago. Clement is currently on a four-matching losing streak against Spaniards.

• No. 3 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero, having never lost before the semifinals here and on a 10-match winning streak against his countrymen, plays No. 20 Felix Mantilla, who is playing a fellow Spaniard for a second consecutive match and has won eight of his last nine matches against his compatriots. The key here: Mantilla has never beaten Ferrero in six attempts.

• Three-times champion Gustavo Kuerten plays Tommy Robredo, the youngest man left in the draw, for a potential quarterfinal meeting with defending champion Costa.



COURT PHILIPPE CHATRIER

NO. 19 FERNANDO GONZALEZ (CHI) v NO. 30 JARKKO NIEMINEN (FIN)

Head-to-head: first meeting

In addition to this being the first time Gonzalez and Nieminen have played each other, this is the first time a Chilean and a Finn have played each other in a Grand Slam tournament.

Taking a broader perspective on this matchup, Gonzalez has never lost to a Scandinavian in four matches against those players. His win-loss against Swedes is 3-0, including a 62 63 victory against Magnus Norman the week before Roland Garros when he helped Chile to its first World Team Cup title. He is 1-0 against Danes, having beaten Kenneth Carlsen 76 64 76 in the second round of the 2002 US Open. Gonzalez has never played anyone from Iceland, Finland or Norway.

Nieminen, on the other hand, has a 9-9 win-loss record against South Americans. If not for his matches against Argentines, he would be 5-0 against South Americans, including 1-0 against Chileans, having defeated Marcelo Rios 76 36 76 in the first round at 2002 Moscow. However, Nieminen is 4-9 against Argentines, with an active four-match losing streak.

Gonzalez v Nieminen

22 Age 21
20 Entry Ranking 34
3 Titles 0
16-8 Career Grand Slam Record 8-5
6-2 Roland Garros Record 5-1
74-48 Career Record 63-45
42-24 Career Record – Clay 28-13
17-9 2003 Record 26-14
15-5 2003 Record – Clay 15-6
6-2 Career Five-Set Record 5-1
0 Comebacks from 0-2 down 1
33-18 Career Tie-break Record 18-11
9-2 2003 Tie-break Record 7-4

• Gonzalez advanced to the round of 16 at 2003 Roland Garros by defeating Sjeng Schalken 76 63 31 ret. in the third round, Albert Portas 63 46 64 62 in the second round and Jan-Michael Gambill 60 62 63 in the first.

• If Gonzalez defeats Nieminen and Juan Carlos Ferrero defeats Felix Mantilla, 2003 Roland Garros would see a rematch of the 1998 boys’ singles final in which Gonzalez defeated Ferrero 46 64 63 for the title. They have met twice previously as pros – though never on clay – with Gonzalez winning both of those matches: on hard court at the 2002 US Open and on carpet at 2002 Basle.

• As 2003 Roland Garros began, Gonzalez was one of seven men who had also won the boys’ singles title here. The 1998 champion, Gonzalez is now one of two former Roland Garros junior champions left in the tournament, joining a fellow South American, either Mariano Zabaleta (1995) or Guillermo Coria (1999), from Argentina. (The Zabaleta-Coria match is to be completed as of the printing of these notes.)

• This is Gonzalez’s first time in the round of 16 at Roland Garros. He is the fifth different Chilean to advance this far at Roland Garros in the Open Era, joining Jaime Fillol, Patricio Cornejo, Hans Gildemeister and Marcelo Rios.

• Of the four Chilean men who have previously reached the round of 16 here, only Patricio Cornejo and Hans Gildemeister advanced onward to the quarterfinals in their first attempt. Cornejo, in 1974, defeated compatriot Jaime Fillol 62 76 46 57 64 to reach the quarters. Gildemeister, in 1978, upset No. 15 seed John Alexander 75 64 36 46 63 to reach the quarters. Marcelo Rios, the only other Chilean man to reach the quarterfinals at Roland Garros, did not do so until his third time to the round of 16.

• Including all Grand Slam events, six Chilean men have reached the quarterfinals. Only one has managed to advance further: Marcelo Rios at the 1998 Australian Open.
Chilean Quarterfinalist at Grand Slams
Player Quarterfinal Appearances Final Round Reached
Patricio Cornejo 1974 Roland Garros Quarterfinals
Jaime Fillol 1975 US Open Quarterfinals
Hans Gildemeister 1978 Roland Garros Quarterfinals
1979 Roland Garros Quarterfinals
1980 Roland Garros Quarterfinals
Ricardo Acuna 1985 Wimbledon Quarterfinals
Marcelo Rios 1997 Australian Open Quarterfinals
1997 US Open Quarterfinals
1998 Australian Open Final
1998 Roland Garros Quarterfinals
1999 Roland Garros Quarterfinals
2002 Australian Open Quarterfinals
Fernando Gonzalez 2002 US Open Quarterfinals

• This is Gonzalez’s third appearance at Roland Garros. Last year, he defeated Fernando Meligeni 62 36 61 62 in the second round then lost in the third round to another Brazilian, Gustavo Kuerten, 63 26 76 64. On his debut as a qualifier in 2001, he defeated wild card Cyril Saulnier 26 62 16 75 64 in the first round then lost in the second to Jacobo Diaz 36 75 63 64.

• Gonzalez’s career-best Grand Slam tournament result is being a quarterfinalist at the 2002 US Open, his seventh Grand Slam event. He was stopped there in five sets by Sjeng Schalken, losing , as stated above.

• Gonzalez is currently on a seven-match winning streak. Last week in Dusseldorf, Gonzalez helped Chile to the World Team Cup title, winning all three of his round robin matches and defeating Jiri Novak 76 76 in the final versus Czech Republic. He also had a perfect record in the doubles, teaming with Nicolas Massu to win all four matches.

• Gonzalez has reached three quarterfinals on clay this season: at Acapulco, Estoril and most recently at TMS Hamburg, where he defeated Lleyton Hewitt 61 36 60 in the round of 16 then lost to David Nalbandian 57 63 64.

• Gonzalez was hindered during the February clay court swing by two injuries. He had to withdraw from his second round match at Buenos Aires after a freak accident playing doubles with Jose Acasuso, when he was struck in the eye. A week later at Acapulco, he had to retire from his quarterfinal match against Gustavo Kuerten with an arm injury after losing the first set.

• Nieminen advanced to the round of 16 at 2003 Roland Garros by defeating qualifier Victor Hanescu 67 64 62 36 63 in the third round, having previously defeated Frenchman in consecutive rounds. He defeated Nicolas Escude 76 67 63 61 in the first round and qualifier Julien Varlet 16 16 76 62 64 in the second.

• Nieminen’s second round victory against Varlet marked his first comeback from two-sets-to-love down. Further, he came back from match point down, with Varlet serving at 53 40-30 in the third set. Nieminen is undefeated in five-set matches in Grand Slam events. (His one five-set loss came in the final of 2001 Stockholm.)

• Nieminen is attempting to become the first Finnish man to reach the quarterfinals of a Grand Slam tournament in the Open Era. By defeating Hanescu, he joined Veli Paloheimo to become one of only two Finnish players to reach the round of 16 at a Grand Slam tournament. Paloheimo advanced to the round of 16 at the 1990 Australian Open, defeating Javier Sanchez 75 64 36 61 in the third round before losing to Mats Wilander 75 64 60.

• At Roland Garros, Aki Rahunen had been the most successful Finn before Nieminen. Rahunen advanced to the third round at 1990 Roland Garros, but then lost to Martin Jaite 76 62 61 in the round of 16.

• This is just Nieminen’s second appearance at Roland Garros. On his debut last year, he advanced to the third round, defeating Nicolas Lapentti and Amir Hadad before losing to Tommy Haas 63 75 26 64.

• Even if Nieminen were to lose this match, he would still have achieved his best Grand Slam tournament result thus far in his young career. His previous best had been third round finishes last year here and this year at the Australian Open. At the Australian Open, he defeated Yevgeny Kafelnikov 63 63 36 46 61 in the second round before losing to Guillermo Coria 75 62 62.

• As a junior, Nieminen played Roland Garros boys’ singles once, in 1999. He defeated American Andy Roddick 63 60 in the first round and Dutchman Fred Hemmes Jr. in the second before losing to Frenchman Eric Prodon 75 75.

• Nieminen reached the final at Munich last month, defeating Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 01 ret. (neck injury) in the semis before losing to Roger Federer 61 64. Also on clay, he reached the third round at TMS Monte Carlo, Barcelona and TMS Rome, all 64-draw. He was a semifinalist on carpet at Milan earlier in the season, losing to Yevgeny Kafelnikov 76 63.

• Following Munich, Nieminen has now played four finals in his career without claiming a title. The other three were 2001 Stockholm (indoor hard court), 2002 Estoril (clay) and 2002 Mallorca (clay).


NO. 9 ALBERT COSTA (ESP) v NO. 32 ARNAUD CLEMENT (FRA)

Head-to-head: Costa leads 2-0
1998 Bournemouth Clay (O) QF Costa 46 63 76
2003 Rome Clay (O) R32 Costa 67 62 64

Costa v Clement

27 Age 25
9 Entry Ranking 36
12 Titles 1
44-27 Career Grand Slam Record 41-22
26-8 Roland Garros Record 7-6
344-221 Career Record 160-150
243-108 Career Record – Clay 32-40
18-11 2003 Record 9-8
10-5 2003 Record – Clay 7-5
8-12 Career Five-Set Record 7-8
2 Comebacks from 0-2 down 3
97-88 Career Tie-break Record 61-52
6-7 2003 Tie-break Record 5-2

• Playing his third consecutive five-setter, Costa came back from two-sets-to-love down for the second time in the tournament when he defeated Nicolas Lapentti 46 46 63 64 64 in the third round. Before that, he defeated Radek Stepanek 63 57 64 36 64 in the second round, and had his first 0-2 comeback in the first round, defeating lucky loser Sergio Roitman 67 26 75 62 62.

• So far, Costa has been on court for a total of 11 hours 56 minutes. His first match lasted 3 hours 38 minutes, his second lasted 3 hours 40 minutes, and his third match was his longest yet, at 4 hours 38 minutes. (His total time on court in winning the title last year was 19 hours 17 minutes.)

• Costa’s defeat of Roitman in the opening round was his first career comeback from two sets to love down, and with it, he narrowly avoided becoming the first defending champion to lose in the first round.

• Costa is the fifth player to come from two-sets-to-love down twice within a single Roland Garros, joining Ronald Agenor of Haiti (1994), Mel Purcell of the United States (1981), Gene Mayer of the United States (1979) and, interestingly, Eduardo Zuleta of Ecuador (1968). He is the first player to achieve this within any Grand Slam event since Stefan Koubek at the 2002 Australian Open.

• Additionally, Costa is the first player to win three consecutive five-set matches at Roland Garros since Gustavo Kuerten in 1997, when he defeated Thomas Muster 67 61 63 36 64 in the third round, Andrei Medvedev 57 61 62 16 75 in the round of 16 and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 62 57 26 60 64 in the quarterfinals.

• On the chance that Costa plays a fourth consecutive five-set in this tournament, it is worth noting that Goran Ivanisevic holds the Open Era record for most consecutive five-set matches played and won in a single tournament, having won four five-setters in a row at the 1992 Olympics in Barcelona.

• Costa had never previously won back-to-back five set matches at a Grand Slam (this is his 29th major).

• The first three rounds contained Costa’s first five-set match wins since last year’s Roland Garros. Since defeating Guillermo Canas 75 36 67 64 60 here in the 2002 quarterfinals, Costa had gone out at each of the two subsequent Grand Slam tournaments he has played – the 2002 US Open and the 2003 Australian Open – in five sets. He lost in the second round at Flushing Meadows to Wayne Ferreira 16 67 64 75 64, and in the third round in Melbourne to Felix Mantilla 36 63 46 61 63. (Costa did not to play 2002 Wimbledon because he was on his honeymoon.)

• Costa has won just one match against Frenchmen in the past year, his defeat of Clement in Rome being his only victory in six matches played against the French in that time. In Grand Slam play, Costa has a 2-2 record against the nation.

• Costa is one of five Spaniard through to the round of 16 at 2003 Roland Garros, accompanied by No. 3 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero, No. 4 Carlo Moya, No. 20 Felix Mantilla and No. 26 Tommy Robredo. This is the second-most in the Open Era; in 1998, six Spanish men reached the round of 16 (three of these appear again this year – Costa, Mantilla and Moya).

• With Ferrero and Mantilla playing each other in the round of 16, a maximum four Spaniards could advance to the quarterfinals. This would be a new record – the most to date is three Spaniards in the last eight, and this has occurred four times.

• Costa is playing his tenth consecutive Roland Garros. Costa’s triumph here last year ended his run of 65 tournaments without a title dating back to 1999 Kitzbuhel. He defeated two fellow Spaniards en route to his first Grand Slam title: good friend Alex Corretja 63 64 36 63 in the semifinals and Juan Carlos Ferrero 61 60 46 63 in the final.

• Since 2002 Roland Garros, Costa has gone another 22 tournaments without success. His best results during this period have been reaching the final on clay at Amersfoort in July 2002 (losing to Juan Ignacio Chela 61 76) and the semifinals on hard court at TMS Miami in March 2003. At Miami, Costa defeated Roger Federer 76 46 76 in the quarterfinals then lost in the semifinals to Andre Agassi 62 64.

• Costa played five European clay court tournaments in preparation for this year’s Roland Garros, and had his best results at TMS Rome, where he reached the third round before losing to eventual champion Felix Mantilla 75 46 61, and at Barcelona, where he lost in the third round to Agustin Calleri 64 62.

• In the Open Era, six players have successfully defended their Roland Garros crown on a total of nine occasions. Gustavo Kuerten was the last player to successfully defend his title in 2001. Kuerten’s 17-match winning streak at Roland Garros was ended last year by Costa 64 75 64 in the round of 16. The full list of Open Era title defences can be found on page 1-2 of the Preview.

• It is ten years since Costa contested the Roland Garros boys’ final, losing to fellow Spaniard Roberto Carretero 60 76.

• Clement reached his first Roland Garros round of 16 when he defeated wild card Nicolas Coutelot 64 63 62 in the third round, his eighth consecutive match win against a fellow Frenchman. He is the only man remaining here who has yet to drop a set.

• In the second round, Clement defeated Lars Burgsmuller 63 63 63, having defeated Thomas Enqvist 63 64 62 in the first.

• It has taken Clement longer to reach the round of 16 here than it took at any other major. At the other Grand Slam events, he reached the round of 16 in his second US Open, his third Australian Open and his fifth Wimbledon.

• Clement is playing his seventh Roland Garros, all having been consecutive. Last year he reached the third round before losing in dramatic fashion – to a Spaniard. Having been two sets to love down against Alex Corretja, he levelled to two sets all and held four match points serving at 4-5 in the fifth set before losing 61 62 46 57 86.

• Until his defeat here last year by Corretja, Clement had won every one of his six previous meetings with Spaniards in a Grand Slam event.
Clement’s Spanish Grand Slam record
Event Player Result
1999 Wimbledon Albert Portas Won 63 62 64 in 1st round
2001 Aus Open Tommy Robredo Won 63 62 75 in 1st round
2001 Aus Open Alberto Martin Won 62 61 61 in 2nd round
2001 Wimbledon German Puentes Won 63 63 64 in 2nd round
2001 US Open Galo Blanco Won 62 46 63 64 in 1st round
2001 US Open Carlos Moya Won 67 64 64 60 in 3rd round
2002 Roland Garros Alex Corretja Lost 61 62 46 57 86 in 3rd round
2003 Roland Garros Albert Costa ???

• In all tournaments, Clement is currently on a four-match losing streak against Spaniards. His last victory against the nation was when he defeated Albert Montanes 63 64 60 in the first round at Wimbledon last year.

• Clement has ensured that there is a Frenchman in the round of 16 here for the sixth consecutive year. He is bidding to become the tenth different Frenchman to reach the quarterfinals of his home Grand Slam event.

• There has been at least one Frenchman through to the Roland Garros quarterfinals 21 times in the Open Era. Sebastien Grosjean has advanced to the last eight for the last two years, in 2001 going on to a semifinal finish (he lost this year in the second round to Fernando Vicente).

• Clement has not reached the quarterfinals of a major since having his best Grand Slam result at the 2001 Australian Open. There, he reached the final before losing to Andre Agassi 64 62 62. His other quarterfinal appearance was at the 2000 US Open.

• This is Clement’s first Grand Slam tournament of 2003. He missed the first two months of the season due to a right wrist injury, which in December had forced him to withdraw at the last minute from the French team that faced Russia in the Davis Cup Final (Russia won 3-2). He did not return to competition until early March at Delray Beach.

• Clement played five clay court tournaments in the weeks preceding Roland Garros, with second round finishes at TMS Monte Carlo, Barcelona, TMS Rome and TMS Hamburg. He lost in the first round at Casablanca.
TOP OF PAGE


2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY SEVEN MEN’S NOTES
Sunday 1 June 2003
Round of 16 Bottom Half

Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 11 Rainer Schuettler (GER) v Martin Verkerk (NED)
No. 2 Andre Agassi (USA) v Flavio Saretta (BRA)

SUZANNE LENGLEN: No. 4 Carlos Moya (ESP) v No. 13 Jiri Novak (CZE)
No. 7 Guillermo Coria (ARG) v Mariano Zabaleta (ARG)




On court today…

• A first meeting between 1999 champion Andre Agassi, who is three matches away from the 1000th of his career, and Flavio Saretta, who will play his 64th tour match today. Saretta is bidding to be the fifth different Brazilian to reach a Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal.

• Australian Open runner-up Rainer Schuettler bidding to be the first German for seven years to reach the Roland Garros quarterfinals. He plays Martin Verkerk, through to the round of 16 in his first Roland Garros appearance and hoping to become the first Dutchman for seven years to reach the quarterfinals here.

• Two Argentines meeting in the round of 16 assures Argentina of having players in the quarterfinals of consecutive Grand Slam tournaments. But will it be Argentina’s most dominant player, No. 7 seed Guillermo Coria or Mariano Zabaleta, who has not won a title since 1998?

• No. 4 seed Carlos Moya and No. 13 Jiri Novak face off in an interesting contrast of fortunes. If not for Novak, who has a three-match winning streak against him, Moya might have an eight-match winning streak against Czech players. Moya is little more than padding for Novak’s record against Spaniards. Novak has won 19 of his last 22 matches against Spanish men.

COURT PHILIPPE CHATRIER

NO. 11 RAINER SCHUETTLER (GER) v MARTIN VERKERK (NED)

Head-to-head: first meeting

Schuettler v Verkerk

27 Age 24
11 Entry Ranking 46
2 Titles 1
24-18 Career Grand Slam Record 3-2
4-4 Roland Garros Record 3-0
167-151 Career Record 25-28
34-46 Career Record – Clay 13-11
30-14 2003 Record 17-14
12-7 2003 Record – Clay 9-6
2-1 Career Five-Set Record 1-0
1 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
57-54 Career Tie-break Record 10-11
10-1 2003 Tie-break Record 8-8

• Schuettler advanced to round of 16 at 2003 Roland Garros for the first time when third round opponent Wayne Ferreira retired with a muscle tear in his right adductor (groin), Schuettler winning 63 16 76 23 ret. He defeated Frenchman Jean-Rene Lisnard 46 62 64 60 in the second round and before that, Cecil Mamiit 61 26 64 62 in the first round.

• This is Schuettler’s fifth appearance at Roland Garros and he had previously never advanced beyond the third round here. This is his first Grand Slam tournament round of 16 outside the Australian Open. In Melbourne in 2001, he advanced to the last 16 but was stopped there by Carlos Moya 76 63 64. In 2003, he went on to the final, as described below.

• Schuettler has the chance to become the first German into the quarterfinals at Roland Garros in seven years. In the Open Era, six different Germans have advanced to the quarterfinals at Roland Garros a total of seven years, most recently in 1996 when Bernd Karbacher and Michael Stich did so. Karbacher lost in the quarters to No. 14 seed Marc Rosset 46 46 63 75 60, while Stich won 64 46 63 62 and, in fact, went on to become the only German to reach the final at Roland Garros since Henner Henkel won the French title in 1937.
German Quarterfinalists at Roland Garros
Year Player Final Roland Garros Result
1996 Bernd Karbacher lost in QF to No. 14 Marc Rosset 46 46 63 75 60
Michael Stich lost in final to No. 6 Yevgeny Kafelnikov 76 75 76
1994 Hendrik Dreekman lost in QF to Magnus Larsson 36 67 76 60 61
1991 Boris Becker lost in SF to No. 4 Andre Agassi 75 63 36 61
Michael Stich lost in SF to No. 9 Jim Courier 62 67 62 64
1989 Boris Becker lost in SF to No. 3 Stefan Edberg 63 64 57 36 62
1987 Boris Becker lost in SF to No. 4 Mats Wilander 64 61 62
1986 Boris Becker lost in QF to Mikael Pernfors 26 64 63 60
1974 Hans-Jurgen Pohmann lost in QF to No. 9 Francois Jauffret 76 63 62

• Schuettler has a 4-2 record against Dutchmen and is currently on a three-match winning streak against them. His last victory against a Dutchman was at the 2003 Australian Open, where he defeated Richard Krajicek 63 75 64 in the second round en route to the final. This was his only previous Grand Slam meeting with the nation.

• Schuettler won his first match at Roland Garros last year, defeating Stefano Galvani 76 26 76 61 in the first round, but then lost in the second round to Guillermo Coria 64 62 63. He had three straight first-round exits 1999-2001.

• The Australian Open is Schuettler’s best Grand Slam event. He reached the final this year, joining Boris Becker and Michael Stich as the only Germans to reach a Grand Slam tournament final in the Open Era. But Schuettler was unable to join Becker and Stich as Grand Slam tournament champions, losing in the Australian Open final to Andre Agassi 62 62 61.

• Schuettler has had his best results on clay this year. Following a quarterfinal finish at Munich, he advanced to his first Tennis Masters Series clay court quarterfinal at Rome, highlighted by his 76 75 first-round win against former Rome champion Magnus Norman. Schuettler lost in the quarterfinals to Juan Carlos Ferrero 64 64.

• Schuettler represented Germany last week in the World Team Cup, compiling a 1-1 record in the round robin. Having lost to David Nalbandian 64 75, he defeated Norman again, 61 63.

• Verkerk won his first Grand Slam tournament match when he defeated Zeljko Krajan of Croatia 63 64 64 in the first round. He played the first five-set match of his career when he defeated Luis Horna 46 64 46 75 62 in the second round, and then defeated No. 29 seed Vince Spadea 57 64 62 75 in the third round.

• Prior to 2003 Roland Garros, Verkerk had played two Grand Slam events and lost in the first round of both. As a qualifier at the 2002 US Open, he fell to Andy Roddick 76 63 64. At this year’s Australian Open, he fell to Mark Philippoussis 64 64 67 63.

• Verkerk attempted to qualify for last year’s Roland Garros, and got to the third and final round of the qualifying tournament before losing in three sets to Frenchman Eric Prodon 57 63 63.

• Verkerk is bidding to reach the quarterfinals of a major in only his third appearance in one. This is not particularly rare: 20 men have reached their first Grand Slam quarterfinal in their first Grand Slam tournament, 18 in their second, and 20 in their third major.

• The last time a player reached the quarterfinals on his debut appearance at Roland Garros was in 2000, when newcomer and No. 16 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero went on to a semifinal finish.

• If he wins today, Verkerk will be the first Dutchman to reach the Roland Garros quarterfinals for seven years. He is already the first Dutchman for seven years to reach the Roland Garros round of 16. In 1996, Richard Krajicek defeated Jonas Bjorkman 63 62 64 in the round of 16 before losing to eventual champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov 63 64 67 62.
Dutchman in the Roland Garros Round of 16
Year Player Round of 16 result Eventual finish
1969 Tom Okker d. Cliff Richey 97 63 63 SFs
1973 Tom Okker d. Stan Smith 63 36 76 36 64 QFs
1993 Paul Haarhuis
Richard Krajicek l. Stefan Edberg 64 36 63 76
d. Carlos Costa 75 36 63 57 108 --
SFs
1994 Jacco Eltingh l. Andrei Medvedev 64 36 64 61 --
1996 Richard Krajicek d. Jonas Bjorkman 63 62 64 QFs
2003 Martin Verkerk ??? ???

• Verkerk is bidding to be the third different Dutchman to reach the Roland Garros quarterfinals in the Open Era. There have been four occurrences of a Dutchman appearing in the last eight here in the Open Era.

• This is Verkerk’s second meeting with a German at tour level. He defeated Alexander Popp 64 75 in the first round at Indianapolis last year.

• Verkerk came into Roland Garros with a career-high Entry Ranking of No. 46. Having climbed 84 places last year, he continued his improvement into this season. He won his first singles title at Milan in February, defeating Ivan Ljubicic 36 75 76 in the semifinals and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 57 75 in the final, and performed well in the latter half of the European clay court season.

• Verkerk has now won nine of his last 11 matches. He reached the semifinals last week at St Polten, falling to Nikolay Davydenko 75 61, and before that the quarters at TMS Rome, where Kafelnikov took revenge for Milan, defeating Verkerk 63 75.

NO. 2 ANDRE AGASSI (USA) v FLAVIO SARETTA (BRA)

Head-to-head: first meeting

Agassi v Saretta

33 Age 22
2 Entry Ranking 78
58 Titles 0
192-42 Career Grand Slam Record 6-5
50-13 Roland Garros Record 4-1
764-233 Career Record 33-30
145-50 Career Record – Clay 22-16
26-2 2003 Record 15-11
8-1 2003 Record – Clay 12-7
23-18 Career Five-Set Record 3-2
5 Comebacks from 0-2 down 0
159-135 Career Tie-break Record 9-20
3-2 2003 Tie-break Record 6-7

• Agassi defeated No. 26 seed Xavier Malisse 64 75 75 in the third round. Before that, he came back from two-sets-to-love down to defeat Mario Ancic 57 16 64 62 75 in the second round and defeated Karol Beck 62 63 63 in the first round.

• Agassi has reached two new milestones with his wins here so far, first jumping ahead of Pete Sampras for career matches won and then going above Bjorn Borg for number of wins at Roland Garros. There is now another milestone looming for the 1999 champion: he is three matches away from his 1000th career match, which he would play here if he reaches the final.

• With his win against Ancic in the second round, Agassi surpassed Pete Sampras for number of career matches won, and currently stands at 764 victories (from a total of 997 matches). This makes Agassi the winningest active player in men’s tennis and puts him in sixth place on the all-time list for the Open Era.

Open Era Match Win Leaders
Rank Player Career
win-loss Total matches
1. Jimmy Connors 1155-270 1425
2. Ivan Lendl 1068-242 1310
3. Guillermo Vilas 940-286 1226
4. John McEnroe 881-198 1079
5. Stefan Edberg 806-270 1076
6. Andre Agassi* 764-233 997
7. Pete Sampras* 762-222 984
8. Ilie Nastase 722-287 1009
9. Boris Becker 713-214 927
10. Michael Chang* 661-307 968
* denotes active players

• With his defeat of Malisse in the third round, Agassi won his 50th match at Roland Garros and now ties two-time Roland Garros champion Nicola Pietrangeli in third place for most matches won here all-time.

• Agassi has jumped above six-times champion Bjorn Borg for match wins at Roland Garros, and will catch up with three-times winner Ivan Lendl if he reaches the final. 1977 Roland Garros champion Guillermo Vilas holds the record for most tournament matches won, with 56 won against 17 losses.


Roland Garros All-Time Match Win Leaders
Rank Player Total
Appearances Career
win-loss
1. Guillermo Vilas 18 56-17
2. Ivan Lendl 15 53-12
3. Andre Agassi 15 50-13
Nicola Pietrangeli 19 50-17
5. Bjorn Borg 8 49-2
6. Mats Wilander 12 47-9
7. Jaroslav Drobny 15 46-13
8. Budge Patty 15 44-14
9. Roy Emerson 13 43-11
Jan Kodes 15 43-13

• Agassi’s second round defeat of Ancic was his fifth comeback from two-sets-to-love down, Agassi’s last three have come at Roland Garros. In the 1999 final, he defeated Andrei Medvedev 16 26 64 63 64. Last year in the round of 16, he defeated Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu 46 36 63 63 63.

• The record for comebacks from two-sets-to-love down at Roland Garros in the Open Era is four, shared by American Harold Solomon and Frenchman Francois Jauffret. In addition to Agassi, Ronald Agenor and Jose Higueras also came back from two-sets-to-love down three times.

• Agassi has reached the Roland Garros round of 16 for the third straight year, going on to a quarterfinal finish each of the past two. At 2002 Roland Garros, Agassi, as the No. 4 seed, defeated Paul-Henri Mathieu 46 36 63 63 63 in the round of 16 then lost to No. 11 seed Juan Carlos Ferrero 63 57 75 63; in 2001, he defeated Franco Squllari 46 62 64 16 60 in the round of 16 then lost to Sebastien Grosjean 16 61 61 63.

• Although he has not played Saretta before, Saretta is seventh different Brazilian that Agassi has faced in his career, after Jose Daher, Luiz Mattar, Fernando Meligeni, Gustavo Kuerten, Jaime Oncins and Ricardo Mello. Agassi won all his first meeting with these men, with the exception of Kuerten (although with the three-times champion Agassi now leads the series 7-4).

• This is Agassi’s second meeting with a Brazilian at Roland Garros. In 2001, he defeated Fernando Meligeni 63 26 61 63 in the third round.

• This is Agassi’s 15th appearance at Roland Garros, the second most after Michael Chang’s now 16 appearances. Both are among six former Roland Garros champions to start in the draw. Agassi won his title in 1999, defeating Andrei Medvedev as stated above. (Chang won his title in 1989.)

• For the fourth time in his career, Agassi plays Roland Garros having won the first leg of the Grand Slam, the Australian Open. In the previous instances of this, Agassi’s best showing at Roland Garros has been reaching the quarterfinals, which he has done twice. In 1995 after his first Australian Open title, Agassi lost in the quarterfinals to Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 63 75. After winning the 2000 Australian Open, Agassi lost in the second round of Roland Garros to Slovak Karol Kucera 26 75 61 60. As the 2001 Australian Open champion, Agassi lost in the quarterfinals to Sebastien Grosjean 16 61 61 63.

• Agassi leads the tour with four titles thus far in 2003, including the U.S. Clay Court Championships in Houston. (His other titles were on hard courts: the Australian Open, San Jose and TMS Miami.) While Houston is played on red clay, prior to Roland Garros, Agassi’s only other match this year on clay was at TMS Rome, where as defending champion he lost in the first round to David Ferrer 06 76 64, ending an 11-match winning streak.

• Saretta advanced to his first Grand Slam round of 16 when Galo Blanco retired from their third round match with a groin injury, Saretta winning 76 63 22 ret. In the second round, Saretta defeated 1996 champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov 64 36 60 67 64 and defeated Alberto Martin 76 60 60 in the first round.

• During his upset of the No. 17 seed Kafelnikov, Saretta had suffered gluteal muscle pain, accompanied by sciatica. While able to work through the discomfort to defeat Kafelnikov, it was enough to force him to retire from his doubles match (w/Fernando Vicente) later in the afternoon, while trailing the team of Julian Knowle and Michael Kohlmann 3-1 in the first set of their first round match.

• Saretta is the seventh different Brazilian man to reach the round of 16 at a Grand Slam tournament in the Open Era. If he upsets Agassi today, Saretta will be the fifth different man from Brazil to reach a Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal, joining Tomas Koch, Fernando Meligeni, Gustavo Kuerten and Andre Sa. All but Sa reached their first – if not only – Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal here at Roland Garros. (Sa reached his only Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal at 2002 Wimbledon.)

• Pending the outcome of Gustavo Kuerten’s third round match against Gaston Gaudio, there could be two Brazilian men in the round of 16 at Roland Garros for only the second time in the Open Era. In 1999, both Kuerten and Fernando Meligeni went on to the quarterfinals, with Kuerten losing there and Meligeni going on to the semis.

• Saretta has a winning record against Americans, 3-2, but before today has not played any of the current top four Americans.

• This is Saretta’s second appearance at Roland Garros, having reached the second round on his debut last year. He defeated qualifier Olivier Marach 62 62 46 67 64 in the first round then lost to David Nalbandian 63 64 60.

• This is Saretta’s sixth major and, before 2003 Roland Garros, the third round was his best finish. At 2002 Wimbledon he upset No. 8 seed Thomas Johansson 67 64 76 36 1210 in the first round and Alexander Waske 67 64 64 75 in the second before losing to fellow Brazilian Andre Sa 26 64 63 16 61.

• Saretta’s year picked up with the arrival of the spring clay court season, starting with a quarterfinal finish at Casablanca, where he lost to Julien Boutter 75 76. He reached the semifinals at Valencia, defeating Gaston Gaudio 36 76 63 in the quarterfinals then falling to Juan Carlos Ferrero 76 62. Last week at St Polten, Saretta advanced to the quarterfinals before losing to Martin Verkerk 76 76.

• Saretta also reached a quarterfinal on hard court at Delray Beach in March (falling to Jan-Michael Gambill 46 76 60).

• Additionally, Saretta has played two challengers this year and won both, on hard court at Sao Paulo (defeating Argentina’s Andres De La Torre 76 63 in the final) and on clay at Bermuda (defeating Nicolas Massu 61 64).

• At tour level, Saretta has yet to reach a final, but he has won a total of five challenger titles.

• As a junior, Saretta reached the quarterfinals of the Roland Garros boys’ championship in 1998, losing to Andreas Vinciguerra 61 62.
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ROLAND GARROS
MEN’S REVIEW
Day Six – 31 May 2003

Live in five
By defeating Nicolas Lapentti 46 46 63 64 64 in 4 hours, 38 minutes in the third round, defending champion Albert Costa has attached his name to quite a few five-set marks of distinction:

• Fifth player to come from two-sets-to-love down twice within a single Roland Garros, joining Ronald Agenor of Haiti (1994), Mel Purcell of the United States (1981), Gene Mayer of the United States (1979) and, interestingly, Eduardo Zuleta of Ecuador (1968).
• Fifth player to play at least three five-set matches in a single Grand Slam event and win at least two of them by coming back from two-sets-to-love down, joining Nicolas Escude (1998 Australian Open), Russell Simpson (1982 Wimbledon), Steve Denton (1981 Australian Open) and Roscoe Tanner (1974 US Open). Escude, thus far, is the only man in the Open Era to have come back from two-sets-to-love down three times in a single Grand Slam tournament.
• First player to come from two-sets-to-love down twice within a single Grand Slam tournament since Stefan Koubek at the 2002 Australian Open. However, these were the only five-set matches Koubek played.
• First player to win three consecutive five-set matches at Roland Garros since Gustavo Kuerten in 1997, when he defeated Thomas Muster 67 61 63 36 64 in the third round, Andrei Medvedev 57 61 62 16 75 in the round of 16 and Yevgeny Kafelnikov 62 57 26 60 64 in the quarterfinals.
• First player to win three consecutive five-set matches at any Grand Slam event since Felix Mantilla at the 2003 Australian Open, where he defeated Mariano Zabaleta 46 75 63 46 64 in the first round, Jan-Michael Gambill 57 64 46 63 62 in the second round and – if you can believe it – Albert Costa 36 63 46 61 63 in the third round. (Mantilla then played a fourth consecutive five-set match, but lost to Sebastien Grosjean 36 26 63 63 63.)

On the chance that Costa plays a fourth consecutive five-set match when he faces Arnaud Clement in the round of 16, it is worth noting that Goran Ivanisevic holds the Open Era record for most consecutive five-set matches played and won in a single tournament, having won four five-setters in a row at the 1992 Olympics in… Barcelona, Costa’s current place of residence.

Costa has been on court 11 hours, 56 minutes thus far at 2003 Roland Garros. His total time on court in winning the title last year was 19 hours, 17 minutes.

Roland Garros singles retirement record set
Following No. 12 seed Sjeng Schalken’s retirement against No. 19 seed Fernando Gonzalez on Saturday, a record-setting seven men have retired from their singles matches at 2003 Roland Garros so far. The previous most for this tournament was six. The new Roland Garros record is two fewer than the Grand Slam tournament record of nine established at the 2002 US Open and one fewer than the Australian Open record of eight (reached most recently this year). Wimbledon, by comparison, has never had more than four retirements in the Open Era.

Player Round Opponent Reason for retirement
Marcelo Rios 1st Mario Ancic Pain in left arm
Giovanni Lapentti 1st Tommy Robredo Cramping in both legs
Richard Gasquet 1st Nicolas Lapentti Cramping in his right hand
Nicolas Massu 2nd Juan Carlos Ferrero Sprained left ankle
Wayne Ferreira 3rd Rainer Schuettler Muscle tear in middle right adductor
Galo Blanco 3rd Flavio Saretta Right adductor
Sjeng Schalken 3rd Fernando Gonzalez Weakness due to suspected virus

Vive Clement
No. 32 seed Arnaud Clement won his eighth consecutive match against a fellow Frenchman with his 64 63 62 victory against qualifier Nicolas Coutelot. Clement thereby advances to the round of 16 at Roland Garros for the first time in his career and is the last Frenchman remaining in men’s singles.

While this all-French matchup of Clement and Coutelot in the third round assured France of having a national representative in the round of 16 of men’s singles for the sixth consecutive year, it is worth noting that this is the longest period for Frenchmen to the round of 16 at Roland Garros since 1979-92, when Frenchmen advanced to at least the round of 16 for 14 consecutive years.
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 ROLAND GARROS - Paris-FRA
FOURTH ROUND MATCH NOTES, WTA

Sunday 1 June 2003


(1) SERENA WILLIAMS (USA #1) vs. (16) AI SUGIYAMA (JPN #15)
Head-to-Head: Williams leads 2-0
Last Meeting: 2000 Miami (Hard Outdoors), R32, Williams won 63 60

S.Williams Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: 22 WTA Tour career prize money: $11,332,679

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
" Making fifth appearance; in 1998 debut held 64 52 lead on eventual winner Sanchez-Vicario; in 2001, extended eventual winner Capriati to 3s in QF; won title last year, d. world No.1 Capriati and No.2 V.Williams en route
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 5)
WINNER (3): Australian Open, Paris Indoors, Miami; FINALIST (1): Charleston; SEMIFINALIST (1): Rome
" Started season by winning her first 21 matches in three-title sweep of Australian Open (d. Clijsters in SF, saving 2 mp and V.Williams in final in 3s to complete non-calendar year Grand Slam), Paris Indoors (d. Mauresmo in final) and Miami (d. Capriati in final in 3s); winning streak ended in Charleston final, l. to Henin-Hardenne, her first loss since falling to another Belgian, Clijsters, in season-ending Championships final in November; represented USA in Fed Cup World Group 1r tie vs. Czech Republic, winning both singles rubbers and partnering Venus to win doubles; semifinalist in Rome falling to Mauresmo in 3s after serving for the match leading 61 54; first losses at consecutive tournaments since Charleston-Berlin 2002
CAREER IN REVIEW
" Winner of 22 WTA Tour singles titles, including the past four Grand Slams, becoming only the fifth woman in history to hold all four major singles crowns at one time; winner of 2002 Roland Garros, Wimbledon and US Open and 2003 Australian Open, d. sister Venus in each final; in winner of 11 doubles titles, six of those Grand Slams (all w/Venus and at least one at each Grand Slam); attained world No.1 ranking on 8 July 2002 by reaching Wimbledon final, replacing Venus in the top spot; has been ranked No.1 ever since
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
" No.1 (8 July 2002 - present)
" Coached by her father, Richard Williams and mother, Oracene Price; here with trainer Kerrie Brooks and hitting partner Jovan Savic

Sugiyama Quick Facts
Age: 27 WTA Tour career singles titles: 4 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,470,271

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
" Ninth consecutive appearance here; best result was reaching 4r in debut in 1995 (d. No.15 seed Sukova) and in 2000 (d. Clijsters)
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 12)
WINNER (1): Scottsdale; SEMIFINALIST (1): Rome; QUARTERFINALIST (1): Antwerp
" Fell 1r of Gold Coast and Sydney (won doubles title w/Clijsters) and 2r of Australian Open (l. to Petrova) and Tokyo [Pan Pacific], stretching No.1 seed Seles to 3s; reached 2r at Paris [Indoors], falling to eventual runner-up Mauresmo after holding sp in first set; reached QF at Antwerp, d. No.6 seed Dokic in 1r (l. to Henin-Hardenne); at Scottsdale, claimed biggest singles title of her career (fourth in all and first in over almost five years, d. No.3 seed Davenport (first win in eight meetings), No.6 Daniilidou, saved 3mp vs. Stevenson in SF and came back later that day to d. top seed Clijsters (Clijsters served for title at 54 second set); later teamed up w/Clijsters to win doubles title, d. Davenport/Raymond in final;; reached 4r at Indian Wells, l. to Rubin in 3s; l. 3r at Miami to Taylor; l. 1r at Sarasota (l. to Martinez), Berlin (l. to Mikaelian) before rebounding in Rome where she became the first Japanese player ever to reach SF there (her first career SF on clay) before falling to Clijsters; on 26 May, rose to No.15, equaling her career-high ranking first reached in August-October 1998
CAREER IN REVIEW
" Winner of four WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Scottsdale, her first Tier II title; also won at 1997 and 1998 Japan Open and 1998 Gold Coast; winner of 22 Tour doubles titles, most recently at 2003 Scottsdale (w/Clijsters); best Grand Slam result was QF finish at 2000 Australian Open; has qualified for season-ending Championships in doubles four times, reaching SF in 2002 (w/Fujiwara); a member of the Japanese Fed Cup Team 1995-2000 and Japanese Olympic Team in 1996 and 2000
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
" No.15 (24 August - 12 October 1998; 26 May 2003 - present)
" Coached by her mother, Fusako

(15) MAGDALENA MALEEVA (BUL #16) vs. (2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2)
Head-to-Head: Clijsters leads 3-0
Last Meeting: 2002 Luxembourg (Hard Indoors), Final, Clijsters won 61 62

Maleeva Quick Facts
Age: 28 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,391,914

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
" Making her 13th appearance here since 1990 (missed only 1998 due to shoulder injury); best result was reaching 4r in 1993 (falling 86 final set to No.8 seed Huber) and 1996 (falling to No.2 seed Seles)
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 10)
QUARTERFINALIST (1): Doha; THIRD ROUND (3): Australian Open, Indian Wells, Miami
" Started season with 2r loss at Sydney as No.8 seed (l. to Coetzer); seeded No.11 reached 3r at Australian Open for fifth time, falling to No.20 seed Bovina 75 third set; as No.5 seed, l. 2r to Raymond 26 76(7) 62 in Tokyo [Pan Pacific]; reached first QF of 2003 at Doha as No.3 seed, falling to eventual runner-up Likhovtseva; upset in 2r of Dubai by Tulyaganova as No.7 seed; beaten in 3r of both Indian Wells (l. to Sugiyama) and Miami (l. to Shaughnessy), won only one match on clay from four tournaments (d. Farina Elia in Rome)
CAREER IN REVIEW
" Winner of nine WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2002 Moscow, her first Tier I title in eight years (1994 Zurich); d. three of tournaments Top 4 seeds, world No.2 V.Williams in third-set tie-break in 2r, No.7 Mauresmo in SF and No.8 Davenport in third-set tie-break in final; best Grand Slam result has been QF finish at 1992 US Open (d. Navratilova en route); member of Bulgarian Fed Cup Team 1991-95 and 2003 and Bulgarian Olympic Team in 1992 and 1996; winner of four Tour doubles titles, including two in 2003 at Miami and Warsaw (both w/L.Huber)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
" No.4 (29 January - 4 February 1996)
" Has worked with David Taylor during 2003

Clijsters Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 12 WTA Tour career prize money: $4,802,349

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
" Making fourth consecutive appearance in this event; finalist in 2001, d. compatriot Henin-Hardenne in 3s SF the day before her 18th birthday; was four times just two points from winning title before falling to Capriati 16 64 1210 in longest third set to a women's final in the tournament's history; surprise 3r loser to C. Fernandez as the No.4 seed last year
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 8)
WINNER (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Rome; FINALIST (3): Antwerp, Scottsdale, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (2): Australian Open, Miami
" Reached SF or better at all eight tournaments, her most consistent start to a season; started 2003 by winning Sydney to become only fourth player in last 20 years (Graf, Seles and Navratilova) to win three or more consecutive titles without loss of a set (2002 Luxembourg and Championships) and continued to Australian Open SF where she led 51 third set and held 2 mp at 52 vs. world No.1 and eventual champion S.Williams before falling 46 63 75; on home soil, reached Antwerp final, d. No.4 Henin-Hardenne in SF (l. to V.Williams); finalist in Scottsdale, serving for the match vs. Sugiyama before falling in 3s; collected career-first Tier I singles title at Indian Wells as No.1 seed, d. Davenport in final; extended win streak to 10 by reaching Miami SF (l. to S.Williams); on 14 April, ascended to world No.2 WTA Ranking, the sixth youngest to do so (after Jaeger, Hingis, Austin, Seles and Graf); in Berlin, scored her first win over Capriati and held 3 mp in final vs. Henin-Hardenne before falling 64 46 75; won second Tier I title of the season in Rome, avenging Scottsdale loss to Sugyiama and d. Mauresmo in the final after Mauresmo served for the match leading 63 65; in doubles, has won three titles to date (all w/Sugiyama) at Sydney, Antwerp and Scottsdale
CAREER IN REVIEW
" Winner of 13 WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Rome; first title came at 1999 Luxembourg as a qualifier; runner-up at 2001 Roland Garros, d. Henin-Hardenne in SF after trailing 62 42 and in final, was two points from victory vs. Capriati on four occasions before falling 16 64 1210, featuring the longest third set in a Roland Garros women's singles final; also semifinalist at 2002 and 2003 Australian Opens; member of the Belgian Fed Cup Team 2000-03, helping her country win its first-ever title in 2001; winner of seven Tour doubles titles; mixed doubles runner-up at 2000 Wimbledon (w/Hewitt)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
" No.2 (14 April - 5 May, 12 May 2003 - present)
" Coached by Marc Dehous; physical trainer is Eveline Coppens

(22) VERA ZVONAREVA (RUS #21) vs. (3) VENUS WILLIAMS (USA #3)
Head-to-Head: First meeting

Zvonareva Quick Facts
Age: 18 WTA Tour career singles titles: 1 WTA Tour career prize money: $335,972

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
" Making her second appearance here; qualified last year for first appearance and reached 3r before falling to eventual champion S.Williams in 3s (46 60 61)
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 13)
WINNER (1): Bol; SEMIFINALIST (1): Strasbourg; QUARTERFINALIST (5)
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WTA:  THIRD ROUND (BOTTOM HALF) MATCH NOTES, 31 May 2003

(30) PAOLA SUÁREZ (ARG #31) vs. (2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2)
Head-to-Head: Clijsters leads 2-0
Last Meeting: 2003 Miami, R32 Hard Outdoors, Clijsters won 62 62

Suárez Quick Facts
Age: 26 WTA Tour career singles titles: 2 WTA Tour career prize money: $2,467,200

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her 10th consecutive appearance; reached first Grand Slam QF at Roland Garros last year, d. two Top 10 seeds and Frenchwomen, No.8 seed Testud and No.10 seed Mauresmo, en route before falling to countrywoman C.Fernandez in 3s; previous best result was 2r on five occasions
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 14)
SEMIFINALIST (1): Bogota; QUARTERFINALIST (3): Auckland, Sarasota, Madrid
• Began season at Auckland and reached QF, taking Daniilidou to 3s; l. 1r at Sydney to Schnyder; l. 3r at Australian Open to Pratt; l. 1r at Tokyo; reached SF at Bogota l. in 3s to eventual champion Zuluaga; l. 1r at Acapulco to eventual finalist Diaz-Oliva; upset in 2r Indian Wells by Reeves; l. 3r at Miami to No.3 seed Clijsters; reached QF at Sarasota before l. in 3s to Majoli; l. 3r at Charleston; l. 3r at Amelia Island to No.3 seed Capriati; l. 1r at Berlin (to Zuluaga) and Rome (to Sugiyama); avenged two losses to Zuluaga last week at Madrid in 2r before l. to eventual champion Rubin in QF; currently world No.1 doubles player (for 39 weeks)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Two-time singles champion on the Tour, 1998 and 2001 Bogota; runner-up at 1999 Madrid, 2000 Sao Paolo, 2001 Auckland, and 2002 Acapulco; 12-time champion on ITF Women’s Circuit; nine-time Tour semifinalist; member of Argentine Fed Cup Team 1996, 1999, 2001-2002; member of 1996 and 2000 Argentine Olympic Team; holds 27 doubles titles including 3 Grand Slam doubles titles (2001 and 2002 French Open and 2002 US Open) all w/Ruano Pascual
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.22 (29 January - 4 February and 2-15 April, 2001)
• Coached by Daniel Pereya

Clijsters Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 12 WTA Tour career prize money: $4,802,349

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fourth consecutive appearance in this event; finalist in 2001, d. compatriot Henin-Hardenne in 3s SF the day before her 18th birthday; was four times just two points from winning title before falling to Capriati 16 64 1210 in longest third set to a women’s final in the tournament’s history; surprise 3r loser to C. Fernandez as the No.4 seed last year
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Rome; FINALIST (3): Antwerp, Scottsdale, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (2): Australian Open, Miami
• Reached SF or better at all eight tournaments, her most consistent start to a season; started 2003 by winning Sydney to become only fourth player in last 20 years (Graf, Seles and Navratilova) to win three or more consecutive titles without loss of a set (2002 Luxembourg and Championships) and continued to Australian Open SF where she led 51 third set and held 2 mp at 52 vs. world No.1 and eventual champion S.Williams before falling 46 63 75; on home soil, reached Antwerp final, d. No.4 Henin-Hardenne in SF (l. to V.Williams); finalist in Scottsdale, serving for the match vs. Sugiyama before falling in 3s; collected career-first Tier I singles title at Indian Wells as No.1 seed, d. Davenport in final; extended win streak to 10 by reaching Miami SF (l. to S.Williams); on 14 April, ascended to world No.2 WTA Ranking, the sixth youngest to do so (after Jaeger, Hingis, Austin, Seles and Graf); in Berlin, scored her first win over Capriati and held 3 mp in final vs. Henin-Hardenne before falling 64 46 75; won second Tier I title of the season in Rome, avenging Scottsdale loss to Sugyiama and d. Mauresmo in the final after Mauresmo served for the match leading 63, 65; in doubles, has won three titles to date (all w/Sugiyama) at Sydney, Antwerp and Scottsdale
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Rome; first title came at 1999 Luxembourg as a qualifier; runner-up at 2001 Roland Garros, d. Henin-Hardenne in SF after trailing 62 42 and in final, was two points from victory vs. Capriati on four occasions before falling 16 64 1210, featuring the longest third set in a Roland Garros women’s singles final; also semifinalist at 2002 and 2003 Australian Opens; member of the Belgian Fed Cup Team 2000-03, helping her country win its first-ever title in 2001; winner of seven Tour doubles titles; mixed doubles runner-up at 2000 Wimbledon (w/Hewitt)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.2 (14 April – 5 May, 12 May 2003 – present)
• Coached by Marc Dehous; physical trainer is Eveline Coppens

(26) SILVIA FARINA ELIA (ITA #27) vs. (3) VENUS WILLIAMS (USA #3)
Head-to-Head: Williams leads 8-0
Last Meeting: 2002 Antwerp, QF Carpet Indoors, Williams won 63 01 ret.

Farina Elia Quick Facts
Age: 31 WTA Tour career singles titles: 3 WTA Tour career prize money: $2,612,588

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her 12th appearance here; qualified for first appearance in 1991 and l. 1r to Novotna; best results attained past two years reaching 4r, l. to Krasnoroutskaya in 2001 and Pierce in 2002
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 12)
WINNER (1): Strasbourg; QUARTERFINALIST (1): Memphis
• Playing her 13th Tour event of 2003; fell in 1r of Sydney to Maleeva 36 75 60; fell in 2r of Australian Open as No.13 seed and Tokyo [Pan Pacific] (l. to Tanasugarn in 3s); beaten in 1r of Paris [Indoors] by compatriot Grande 75 third set; as No.1 seed, reached Memphis QF before falling to Granville 26 76(6) 64; fell to another Italian, Schiavone, in Scottsdale 2r before reaching Indian Wells 3r (after 1r bye), falling to Dechy in 3s, the start of a four-match losing streak, fell in 2r at Miami after 1r bye (retired in third set vs. Srebotnik with heat exhaustion); withdrew from Charleston and Amelia Island with back and right leg injuries; l. 2r at Bol as No.2 seed after 1r bye (l. to Talaja in 3s); l. 1r in Berlin (to Serna) and 1r in Rome (l. to Maleeva); as No.7 seed, won third consecutive title at Strasbourg, eliminating No.2 seed Myskina en route
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of three WTA Tour singles titles, at 2001, 2002, and 2003 Strasbourg; before winning first title in 2001, was runner-up in first seven Tour finals (from 1991 San Marino through to 2001 Gold Coast); winner of eight Tour doubles titles, most recently at 2001 Strasbourg (w/Tulyaganova); has twice qualified for the season-ending Championships in singles; a member of the Italian Fed Cup Team 1993-95, 1997-2000 and 2002; a member of the Italian Olympic Team in 1996 and 2000
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.11 (20 May – 9 June 2002)
• Coached by her husband, Francesco Elia

V.Williams Quick Facts
Age: 22 WTA Tour career singles titles: 29 WTA Tour career prize money: $12,462,628

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her seventh consecutive appearance (most of any at one event in her career) here; finalist last year, d. former three-time champion Seles en route before falling to her sister Serena; Quarterfinalist in 1998 and 2000
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 5)
WINNER (1): Antwerp; FINALIST (2): Australian Open, Warsaw; FOURTH ROUND (1): Miami
• Started season by reaching first Australian Open final (ninth Grand Slam final overall and fourth in succession), first time in five meetings to take a set off sister Serena before losing 76, 36, 64; followed up with successful title defense in Antwerp, dropping just 18 games in four matches, d. world No.5 Hantuchova in SF and No.3 Clijsters in final to win her first title in six months; upset in 4r of Miami by world No.22 Shaughnessy in straight sets; represented USA in Fed Cup World Group 1r vs. Czech Republic, winning both singles rubbers (d. Bedanova and Benesova) and teamed with sister Serena to win doubles rubber over Bedanova/Birnerova; reached final of Warsaw coming from a 26, 03 deficit to d. Schiavone in QF; in final vs. Mauresmo, saved two set points to win first set tiebreak only to lose next nine games in a row before retiring with a strained abdominal muscle
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 29 WTA Tour singles titles, including four Grand Slams (2000-2001 Wimbledon and US Open crowns), an Olympic gold medal (2000 Sydney) and five Tier I titles (fifth among active players); winner of six Grand Slam women’s doubles titles (all w/Serena, most recently at 2003 Australian Open) and two mixed doubles majors; a member of the US Olympic Team in 2000 and the US Fed Cup Team 1999 and 2003
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 11 weeks (25 February – 17 March, 22 April – 19 May, 10 June – 7 July 2002)
• Coached by father, Richard Williams, and mother, Oracene Price; trainer is Kerrie Brooks

(6) LINDSAY DAVENPORT (USA #6) vs. (25) NATHALIE DECHY (FRA #23)
Head-to-Head: Davenport leads 2-0
Last Meeting: 1999 New Haven, R16 Hard Outdoors, Davenport won 64 62

Davenport Quick Facts
Age: 26 WTA Tour career singles titles: 38 WTA Tour career prize money: $15,530,827

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making ninth appearance here; best result was reaching SF as No.2 seed in 1998 d. reigning champion Majoli in 3s before falling to eventual winner Sanchez; QF in 1996 (l. to Martinez) and 1999 (l. to eventual champion Graf)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 7)
WINNER (1): Tokyo PPO; FINALIST (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Amelia Island; SEMIFINALIST (1): Charleston
• Reached Sydney final (exactly one year after undergoing right knee arthroscopic surgery) d. No.4 seed Hantuchova in third-set tiebreak QF before falling to No.2 seed Clijsters in final; made earliest exit from Australian Open in six years, falling 4r to Henin-Hardenne 75 57 97 in three hours, 13 minutes; won first title since her comeback at Tokyo PPO, d. Seles in 3s final; at Scottsdale lost opening round match to eventual champion Sugiyama; runner-up at Indian Wells, d. No.2 seed Capriati in 3s before l. to top seed Clijsters; reached 4r at Miami, ret. during match against Bartoli at 6-0 due to right hamstring strain; in Charleston reached first Tier I or better clay court SF in five years, l. to top seed and world No.1 S. Williams; at Amelia Island d. Schnyder and Capriati en route to the final where she led Dementieva 64, 42 before falling; withdrew from Madrid due to continuing problems with right hamstring
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 38 career singles titles (10th all-time), including three Grand Slams (1998 US Open, 1999 Wimbledon, 2000 Australian Open) and one Olympic gold medal (Atlanta 1996); winner of 32 doubles titles, including three Grand Slams; has been ranked No.1 in the world in both singles (38 weeks in total) and doubles (32 weeks); No.1 in singles and doubles concurrently during April and May 2000; member of US Fed Cup team 1993-2000, 2002 and the US Olympic teams in 1996 and 2000; winner of the season-ending Championships in singles 1999 and doubles 1996-98
CAREER-HIGH RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 38 weeks (Oct. 12 ‘98–Feb. 7, ‘99; July 5–Aug. 8 ‘99; Apr. 3–May 7, May 15-21, 2000; Nov. 5, 01–Jan. 13 ‘02)
• Split amicably from coach of seven years, Robert Van’t Hof at the end of 2002; working with Adam Peterson since mid-March

Dechy Quick Facts
Age: 24 WTA Tour career singles titles: 1 WTA Tour career prize money: $1,489,494

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making ninth consecutive appearance here; best result was reaching 3r four out of the last five years (1998-99 and 2001-02)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 13)
WINNER (1): Gold Coast; SEMIFINALIST (1): Sarasota; QUARTERFINALS (2): Antwerp, Scottsdale
• Started season by winning career-first WTA Tour singles title at Gold Coast as No.2 seed; scored comeback wins over Pratt in 2r and Bovina in SF before beating Mikaelian in final in 3s; retired during 1r match in Canberra while trailing Weingärtner 5-0 first set with left thigh strain; as No.16 seed (first time seeded in Top 16), fell in 3r of Australian Open to Daniilidou; at Paris Indoors, fell 1r to Sugiyama; reached QF at Antwerp, l. to No.4 seed Hantuchova; reached QF at Scottsdale l. to Stevenson; at Indian Wells, reached 4r where she was only player to take a set of eventual winner Clijsters; fell to Dokic in 3r Miami, eventual winner Myskina in SF Sarasota, stretched eventual winner Henin-Hardenne to 3s in Charleston 3r; fell to No.6 seed Seles in Amelia Island 3r; reached 3r of Berlin (l. to Capriati) and Rome (l. S. Williams)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of one WTA Tour singles title at 2003 Gold Coast (d. Mikaelian in final; see above); runner-up at two more WTA Tour singles events – 2000 Oklahoma City and Estoril; has reached another eight SF and 13 QF and finished the past five seasons ranked inside the Top 50; best Grand Slam results have been 4r finishes at 1998 US Open and 1999 Wimbledon; a member of the French Fed Cup team 2000-02 and the French Olympic team in 2000
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.18 (January 13 – 27, 2003)
• Coached by Georges Goven and travels with her boyfriend, Antoine


(7) JENNIFER CAPRIATI (USA #7) vs. (Q) JULIA VAKULENKO (UKR #134)
Head-to-Head: First Meeting

Capriati Quick Facts
Age: 27 WTA Tour career singles titles: 13 WTA Tour career prize money: $7,399,901

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Tenth appearance here; won the title in 2001 d. S. Williams, world No.1 Hingis and then Clijsters in longest third set in a women’s Roland Garros final; Semifinalist in 1990 (youngest player ever to reach GS SF at 14) and again in 2002 as the world No.1 falling to eventual winner S. Williams; Quarterfinalist in 1992-93
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
FINALIST (1): Miami; SEMIFINALIST (4): Dubai, Indian Wells, Amelia Island, Berlin; QUARTERFINALIST (1): Rome
• Started season with consecutive opening round 3s losses in Sydney (to Panova) and Australian Open (to Weingärtner) – becoming the first defending champion to lose in 1r; withdrew from Tokyo [Pan Pacific] citing the need to recover from recent eye surgery to remove sunspots; semifinalist in Dubai, pushing eventual champion Henin-Hardenne to 3s; as No.2 seed, reached Indian Wells SF, falling to Davenport in 3s; runner-up in Miami for third consecutive year, l. to S.Williams in 3s; semifinalist at Amelia Island, falling to Davenport in 3s; in Berlin, reached fifth straight SF of 2003, saving 2 mp in second set vs. eventual runner-up Clijsters before falling in 3s; quarterfinalist in Rome, falling to Mauresmo 63, 76(10) after holding 4 sp in tiebreak
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 Tour singles titles (incl. three Grand Slams at 2001 Australian and French Opens and 2002 Australian Open) and one doubles title (1991 Rome w/Seles); had best year of her career in 2001, winning first Grand Slams and reaching No.1 for the first time on 15 October, finishing season at No.2; named 2001 ITF Women’s Singles World Champion; singles gold medallist at 1992 Barcelona Olympics; in 1990 as a 14-year-old, became youngest player to reach a Grand Slam SF (at Roland Garros), win a singles title (Puerto Rico) and reach the Top 10; a member of the US Fed Cup Team 1990-91, 1996 and 2000 and the US Olympic Team in 1992
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 17 weeks (Oct. 15–Nov. 4, 2001; Jan. 14–Feb. 24, Mar. 18–Apr. 21, May 20–June 9, 2002)
• Coached by her father, Stefano Capriati and here with trainer Lisa Austin

Vakulenko Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 0 WTA Tour career prize money: $109,364

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her debut appearance in the main draw; failed to qualify in 2002; currently playing in first Grand Slam main draw
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 16)
QUARTERFINALIST (1): ITF/Fountain Hills-USA; SECOND ROUND (1): Amelia Island
• Contested first WTA Tour event at Hyderabad l. in 1r to Vanc; after failing to qualify for Antwerp, Scottsdale, and Indian Wells, reached QF of ITF/Fountain Hills-USA l. to Drake in 3s; qualified for Amelia Island and d. Frazier in 1r before falling to Raymond in 2r in 3s
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Holds three ITF Women’s Circuit titles, most recently winning 2002 Boynton Beach and Deauville in the same month period; has reached the finals of five additional ITF events; upset world No.20 and No.1 seed Tulyaganova at 2001 Pattaya for career best win
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.113 (20 – 27 June, 2002)
• Coached by Christian Filhol
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2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY SIX MEN’S NOTES
Saturday 31 May 2003
Third Round Top Half

Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 32 Arnaud Clement (FRA) v (Q) Nicolas Coutelot (FRA)
No. 3 Juan Carlos Ferrero (ESP) v No. 25 Tim Henman (GBR)

SUZANNE LENGLEN: No. 9 Albert Costa (ESP) v Nicolas Lapentti (ECU)
No. 15 Gustavo Kuerten (BRA) v No. 21 Gaston Gaudio (ARG)

COURT 1: No. 12 Sjeng Schalken (NED) v No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez (CHI)
No. 1 Lleyton Hewitt (AUS) v No. 28 Tommy Robredo (ESP)

COURT 2: No. 20 Felix Mantilla (ESP) v Fernando Vicente (ESP)

COURT 7: No. 30 Jarkko Nieminen (FIN) v (Q) Victor Hanescu (ROM)


On court today…

• For only the second time in the Open Era, a Finn and a Romanian face off in a Grand Slam tournament, with No. 30 seed Jarkko Nieminen playing qualifier Victor Hanescu.

• An all-French matchup between No. 32 seed Arnaud Clement and qualifier Nicolas Coutelot means France is assured of having a national representative in the round of 16 of men’s singles for the sixth consecutive year. That is the longest period for Frenchmen to the round of 16 at Roland Garros since 1979-92.

• Three-time champion Gustavo Kuerten attempts to reassert his clay court supremacy against Gaston Gaudio, one of the winningest clay court players of the past two years. Kuerten has a fairly strong win-loss against Argentines, at 27-9. But the first match he lost after hip surgery was to Gaudio, who has beaten Kuerten last two times the have played.

• No. 25 seed Tim Henman, still finding his form after shoulder surgery, bidding to upset 2002 runner-up Juan Carlos Ferrero and advance to the last 16 at Roland Garros for the first time.

• A rematch of a 2002 US Open quarterfinal sees No. 12 seed Sjeng Schalken attempt to prevent No. 19 Fernando Gonzalez from adding the Roland Garros men’s title to his 1998 Roland Garros boys’ title.

• Albert Costa and Nicolas Lapentti in their eighth career meeting. The defending champion leads the series, 5-2.

• Fellow Spaniards Felix Mantilla and Fernando Vicente meeting for the sixth time. Vicente is attempting to win his first match against Rome champion Mantilla.

• No. 1 seed Lleyton Hewitt looking to advance to the Roland Garros round of 16 for the fourth straight year against 2000 boys’ runner-up Tommy Robredo.
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MEN’S REVIEW
Day Five – 30 May 2003

Agassi moves up Roland Garros wins list
With his straight-sets defeat of No. 26 seed Xavier Malisse 64 75 75, Agassi won his 50th match at Roland Garros and now ties two-time Roland Garros champion Nicola Pietrangeli in third place for most matches won here all-time.

During this tournament, Agassi has jumped above six-times champion Bjorn Borg, and will catch up with three-times winner Ivan Lendl if he reaches the final.

Roland Garros All-Time Match Win Leaders
Rank Player Total
Appearances Career
win-loss
1. Guillermo Vilas 18 56-17
2. Ivan Lendl 15 53-12
3. Andre Agassi 15 50-13
Nicola Pietrangeli 19 50-17
5. Bjorn Borg 8 49-2
6. Mats Wilander 12 47-9
7. Jaroslav Drobny 15 46-13
8. Budge Patty 15 44-14
9. Roy Emerson 13 43-11
Jan Kodes 15 43-13

With Vince Spadea losing to Dutchman Martin Verkerk 57 64 62 75 in the third round, Agassi is the last American man remaining at 2003 Roland Garros.

Ferreira injured at Roland Garros for fourth time
Wayne Ferreira was forced to retire from his third round match against Rainer Schuettler on Friday with a groin injury. He was trailing by two sets to one and was leading 3-2 in the fourth on serve when he suffered the injury.

This is the fourth time that injury has forced the 31-year-old veteran out of Roland Garros, either by retirement or walkover. With Wimbledon following so soon after Roland Garros, each time it seemed that Ferreira’s streak of consecutive Grand Slam events might be in danger. Each time however, he has managed to be fit for Wimbledon and keep his streak intact.

Ferreira was treated at hospital on Friday afternoon, pending an update on his condition which should ascertain whether his latest injury will put an end to his streak of 50 consecutive Grand Slam tournaments played. If Ferreira is ruled out of Wimbledon, he will not be able to catch Stefan Edberg, who holds the all-time record for consecutive majors played with 54.

Ferreira’s Roland Garros Injury History
Year Injury Round Score
1994 Pulled stomach muscle 1st Lost to Alberto Berasategui 63 ret.
1997 Badly sprained right ankle 3rd Gave a walkover to Petr Korda
1998 Torn right ankle ligament 3rd Lost to Marcelo Rios 61 33 ret.
2003 Groin injury 3rd Lost to Rainer Schuettler 63 16 76 23 ret.

Overall, Ferreira has retired from or given a walkover at a Grand Slam tournament a total of eight times. The other times were at the 1991 US Open (torn right ankle ligaments), the 1997 Australian Open (hip flexor), 2001 Wimbledon (respiratory problems) and the 2002 Australian Open (torn abdominal muscle).

Down to two qualifiers
Ferreira was not the only man to suffer a groin injury on Friday. For the same reason, qualifier Galo Blanco had to retire from his third round match against Flavio Saretta trailing 67 36 22. The Brazilian advances to his first Grand Slam round of 16.

With Attila Savolt also succumbing to No. 7 seed Guillermo Coria, 64 61 61, both qualifiers remaining in the bottom half of the draw are out. There are two qualifiers still in the tournament in the top half. Both Nicolas Coutelot and Victor Hanescu take on seeds - No. 32 Arnaud Clement and No. 30 Jarkko Nieminen respectively – for a place in the last 16 on Saturday.

All-Argentine clash in round of 16
With No. 7 Guillermo Coria and Mariano Zabaleta, who defeated Younes El Aynaoui 62 64 36 76, both winning their matches on Friday, Argentina has two men through to the round of 16. Unfortunately, they will play each other in that round.

This is the second all-Argentine match-up of the tournament, Franco Squillari having defeated Agustin Calleri in the opening round. In the Open Era, it will be the 16th time two men from Argentina have faced each other at Roland Garros.

With No. 21 seed Gaston Gaudio yet to play his third round match against Gustavo Kuerten, there could be a maximum of three Argentine men through to the round of 16.
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WTA Match Notes Day 4 ...

(2) KIM CLIJSTERS (BEL #2) vs. MARLENE WEINGÄRTNER (GER #72)
Head-to-Head: First Meeting

Clijsters Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 12 WTA Tour career prize money: $4,802,349
ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fourth consecutive appearance in this event; finalist in 2001, d. compatriot Henin-Hardenne in 3s SF the day before her 18th birthday; was four times just two points from winning title before falling to Capriati 16 64 12-10 in longest third set to a women’s final in the tournament’s history; surprising 3r loser to C. Fernandez as the No.4 seed last year
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Rome; FINALIST (3): Antwerp, Scottsdale, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (2): Australian Open, Miami
• Reached SF or better at all eight tournaments, her most consistent start to a season; started 2003 by winning Sydney to become only fourth player in last 20 years (Graf, Seles and Navratilova) to win three or more consecutive titles without loss of a set (2002 Luxembourg and Championships) and continued to Australian Open SF where she led 51 third set and held 2 mp at 52 vs. world No.1 and eventual champion S.Williams before falling 46 63 75; on home soil, reached Antwerp final, d. No.4 Henin-Hardenne in SF (l. to V.Williams); finalist in Scottsdale, serving for the match vs. Sugiyama before falling in 3s; collected career-first Tier I singles title at Indian Wells as No.1 seed, d. Davenport in final; extended win streak to 10 by reaching Miami SF (l. to S.Williams); on 14 April, ascended to world No.2 WTA Ranking, the sixth youngest to do so (after Jaeger, Hingis, Austin, Seles and Graf); in Berlin, scored her first win over Capriati and held 3 mp in final vs. Henin-Hardenne before falling 64 46 75; won second Tier I title of the season in Rome, avenging Scottsdale loss to Sugyiama and d. Mauresmo in the final after Mauresmo served for the match leading 63, 65; in doubles, has won three titles to date (all w/Sugiyama) at Sydney, Antwerp and Scottsdale
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 WTA Tour singles titles, most recently at 2003 Rome; first title came at 1999 Luxembourg as a qualifier; runner-up at 2001 Roland Garros, d. Henin-Hardenne in SF after trailing 62 42 and in final, was two points from victory vs. Capriati on four occasions before falling 16 64 1210, featuring the longest third set in a Roland Garros women’s singles final; also semifinalist at 2002 and 2003 Australian Opens; member of the Belgian Fed Cup Team 2000-03, helping her country win its first-ever title in 2001; winner of seven Tour doubles titles; mixed doubles runner-up at 2000 Wimbledon (w/Hewitt)
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.2 (14 April – 5 May, 12 May 2003 – present)
• Coached by Marc Dehous; physical trainer is Eveline Coppens

Weingärtner Quick Facts
Age: 23 WTA Tour career singles titles: none WTA Tour career prize money: $745,525
ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making fifth straight appearance in main draw here; second time reaching 2r here after 2000
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 10)
QUARTERFINALIST (1): Canberra; FOURTH ROUND (1): Miami; THIRD ROUND (2): Australian Open, Amelia Island
• Playing seventh Tour main draw event of 2003; as a lucky loser, reached QF of Canberra, d. top seed Dechy; at Australian Open, stunned two-time defending champion and world No. 3 Capriati in 1r en route to 3r finish, coming back from a 26 14 deficit to win in 3s and handing a reigning Aus. Open champ her earliest exit ever; fell 1r of Bogota to Rodionova in 3s; won five straight matches to qualify for Miami and reach 4r, with upsets of Top 20 players Coetzer and Daniilidou; as a lucky loser (due to No. 13 Martinez’ withdrawal) advanced to 3r Amelia Island before falling to No. 2 seed Davenport; in Fed Cup lost two singles matches vs. Slovakia, including 26, 76, 75 loss to No. 9 Hantuchova; as WC in Berlin, won her first ever Tour match in Germany d. former two-time champion Martinez in straight sets before falling to No. 8 seed Dokic 76, 64
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Two-time WTA Tour semifinalist at 2001 Auckland and Charleston (d. No. 7 Coetzer); four-time quarterfinalist at 2002 Quebec City, 2001 Bol, 1998 and 1999 Sopot (d. No. 8 Sanchez-Vicario); in juniors, was runner-up at three GS, 1995 Roland Garros, 1996 US Open and 1997 Australian Open; member of German Fed Cup Team from 1997 – 2000 and 2002
CAREER-HIGH RANKING & COACH
• No. 36 (February 4 – 17, 2002)
• Coached by Borna Bikic

(3) VENUS WILLIAMS (USA #3) vs. EVIE DOMINIKOVIC (AUS #110)
Head-to-Head: First Meeting

V.Williams Quick Facts
Age: 22 WTA Tour career singles titles: 29 WTA Tour career prize money: $12,462,628

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her seventh consecutive appearance (most of any at one event in her career) here; finalist last year, d. former three-time champion Seles en route before falling to her sister Serena; Quarterfinalist in 1998 and 2000
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 5)
WINNER (1): Antwerp; FINALIST (2): Australian Open, Warsaw; FOURTH ROUND (1): Miami
• Started season by reaching first Australian Open final (ninth Grand Slam final overall and fourth in succession), first time in five meetings to take a set off sister Serena before losing 76, 36, 64; followed up with successful title defense in Antwerp, dropping just 18 games in four matches, d. world No.5 Hantuchova in SF and No.3 Clijsters in final to win her first title in six months; upset in 4r of Miami by world No.22 Shaughnessy in straight sets; represented USA in Fed Cup World Group 1r vs. Czech Republic, winning both singles rubbers (d. Bedanova and Benesova) and teamed with sister Serena to win doubles rubber over Bedanova/Birnerova; reached final of Warsaw coming from a 26, 03 deficit to d. Schiavone in QF; in final vs. Mauresmo, saved two set points to win first set tiebreak only to lose next nine games in a row before retiring with a strained abdominal muscle
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 29 WTA Tour singles titles, including four Grand Slams (2000-2001 Wimbledon and US Open crowns), an Olympic gold medal (2000 Sydney) and five Tier I titles (fifth among active players); winner of six Grand Slam women’s doubles titles (all w/Serena, most recently at 2003 Australian Open) and two mixed doubles majors; a member of the US Olympic Team in 2000 and the US Fed Cup Team 1999 and 2003
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 11 weeks (25 February – 17 March, 22 April – 19 May, 10 June – 7 July 2002)
• Coached by father, Richard Williams, and mother, Oracene Price; trainer is Kerrie Brooks

Dominikovic Quick Facts
Age: 23 WTA Tour career singles titles: 0 WTA Tour career prize money: $433,689

TURNS 23-YEARS-OLD TODAY (29 MAY)!!
ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Fifth appearance at Roland Garros, third in the main draw; after failing to qualify in 1998 and 2000, fell in 1r in 2001 to Poutchek in 3s; reached 3r in 2002, d. No.28 seed Stevenson in 1r before falling to Capriati
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 12)
THIRD ROUND (1): Australian Open
• After failing to qualify for Gold Coast, fell in 1r of Sydney to world No.27 and eventual semifinalist Panova; reached 3r at Australian Open for second time in past three years, d. No.22 Kremer in 2r (l. to Chladkova); reached 2r at Hyderabad before falling to Pierce; l. in 1r of Doha and Dubai before playing Miami as a lucky loser; received 1r bye after filling injured Seles’s spot in the main draw, losing 2r to eventual quarterfinalist Bartoli 46 76(1) 61; failed to qualify for Sarasota and Charleston; fell in 1r of Amelia Island Rome qualifying and Strasbourg qualifying
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of eight ITF Women’s Circuit singles titles, most recently at 2002 ITF/Rockhampton-AUS; best Tour results have been 3r finishes at 2001 and 2003 Australian Open and 2002 Roland Garros; winner of one Tour doubles title at 2001 Bali (w/Tanasugarn) and Shanghai (w/Tanasugarn); member of the Australian Fed Cup Team in 2001-02
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.64 (10-23 September 2001)
• Coached by Adrian Montesinos


(6) LINDSAY DAVENPORT (USA #6) vs. IRODA TULYAGANOVA (UKR #34)
Head-to-Head: Davenport leads 2-0
Last Meeting: 2003 Australian Open, R64-Hard, Davenport won 67(7), 64, 75

Davenport Quick Facts
Age: 26 WTA Tour career singles titles: 38 WTA Tour career prize money: $15,530,827

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making ninth appearance here; best result was reaching SF as No.2 seed in 1998 d. reigning champion Majoli in 3s before falling to eventual winner Sanchez; QF in 1996 (l. to Martinez) and 1999 (l. to eventual champion Graf)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 7)
WINNER (1): Tokyo PPO; FINALIST (3): Sydney, Indian Wells, Amelia Island; SEMIFINALIST (1): Charleston
• Reached Sydney final (exactly one year after undergoing right knee arthroscopic surgery) d. No.4 seed Hantuchova in third-set tiebreak QF before falling to No.2 seed Clijsters in final; made earliest exit from Australian Open in six years, falling 4r to Henin-Hardenne 75 57 97 in three hours, 13 minutes; won first title since her comeback at Tokyo PPO, d. Seles in 3s final; at Scottsdale lost opening round match to eventual champion Sugiyama; runner-up at Indian Wells, d. No.2 seed Capriati in 3s before l. to top seed Clijsters; reached 4r at Miami, ret. during match against Bartoli at 6-0 due to right hamstring strain; in Charleston reached first Tier I or better clay court SF in five years, l. to top seed and world No.1 S. Williams; at Amelia Island d. Schnyder and Capriati en route to the final where she led Dementieva 64, 42 before falling; withdrew from Madrid due to continuing problems with right hamstring
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 38 career singles titles (10th all-time), including three Grand Slams (1998 US Open, 1999 Wimbledon, 2000 Australian Open) and one Olympic gold medal (Atlanta 1996); winner of 32 doubles titles, including three Grand Slams; has been ranked No.1 in the world in both singles (38 weeks in total) and doubles (32 weeks); No.1 in singles and doubles concurrently during April and May 2000; member of US Fed Cup team 1993-2000, 2002 and the US Olympic teams in 1996 and 2000; winner of the season-ending Championships in singles 1999 and doubles 1996-98
CAREER-HIGH RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 38 weeks (Oct. 12 ‘98–Feb. 7, ‘99; July 5–Aug. 8 ‘99; Apr. 3–May 7, May 15-21, 2000; Nov. 5, 01–Jan. 13 ‘02)
• Split amicably from coach of seven years, Robert Van’t Hof at the end of 2002; working with Adam Peterson since mid-March

Tulyaganova Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: 3 WTA Tour career prize money: $795,421

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her third straight appearance here; reached 3r last year falling to Schnyder 75, 76
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 13)
FINALIST (1): Hyderabad; SEMIFINALIST (1): Madrid; QUARTERFINAL (2): Dubai, Berlin
• Started season with her lowest ranking in 18 months (No. 57) and but showed her improved form in stretching former champion and No. 9 seed Davenport 67, 64, 75 in 2r of Australian Open; followed up with her sixth Tour singles final in Hyderabad, India; Quarterfinalist in Dubai d. No. 7 seed Maleeva before falling to No. 4 seed Seles; 4r finish in Miami d. No. 16 seed Bovina falling to No. 1 S.Williams; in Berlin d. No. 11 Dokic 76 final set to reach her first Tier I QF before falling to Mauresmo 76, 64; fell 1r of Rome to No. 14 seed Coetzer in 3s; reached ninth WTA Tour singles SF at Madrid last week, l. to eventual winner Ribin
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of three WTA Tour singles titles; won first singles title in 2000 in hometown of Tashkent (ranked No. 166) in only third main draw Tour event; in 2001, won two singles titles (Vienna and Knokke-Heist), recorded second fastest serve on Tour at 191 km/h; d. Top 10 players Clijsters and Henin and finished season at No. 20
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.16 (June 17-23, 2002)
• Coached by Alexander Zlatoustov

(7) JENNIFER CAPRIATI (USA #7) vs. MARION BARTOLI (FRA #59)
Head-to-Head: First Meeting

Capriati Quick Facts
Age: 27 WTA Tour career singles titles: 13 WTA Tour career prize money: $7,399,901

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Tenth appearance here; won the title in 2001 d. S. Williams, world No.1 Hingis and then Clijsters in longest third set in a women’s Roland Garros final; Semifinalist in 1990 (youngest player ever to reach GS SF at 14) and again in 2002 as the world No.1 falling to eventual winner S. Williams; Quarterfinalist in 1992-93
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
FINALIST (1): Miami; SEMIFINALIST (4): Dubai, Indian Wells, Amelia Island, Berlin; QUARTERFINALIST (1): Rome
• Started season with consecutive opening round 3s losses in Sydney (to Panova) and Australian Open (to Weingärtner) – becoming the first defending champion to lose in 1r; withdrew from Tokyo [Pan Pacific] citing the need to recover from recent eye surgery to remove sunspots; semifinalist in Dubai, pushing eventual champion Henin-Hardenne to 3s; as No.2 seed, reached Indian Wells SF, falling to Davenport in 3s; runner-up in Miami for third consecutive year, l. to S.Williams in 3s; semifinalist at Amelia Island, falling to Davenport in 3s; in Berlin, reached fifth straight SF of 2003, saving 2 mp in second set vs. eventual runner-up Clijsters before falling in 3s; quarterfinalist in Rome, falling to Mauresmo 63, 76(10) after holding 4 sp in tiebreak
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 13 Tour singles titles (incl. three Grand Slams at 2001 Australian and French Opens and 2002 Australian Open) and one doubles title (1991 Rome w/Seles); had best year of her career in 2001, winning first Grand Slams and reaching No.1 for the first time on 15 October, finishing season at No.2; named 2001 ITF Women’s Singles World Champion; singles gold medallist at 1992 Barcelona Olympics; in 1990 as a 14-year-old, became youngest player to reach a Grand Slam SF (at Roland Garros), win a singles title (Puerto Rico) and reach the Top 10; a member of the US Fed Cup Team 1990-91, 1996 and 2000 and the US Olympic Team in 1992
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 17 weeks (Oct. 15–Nov. 4, 2001; Jan. 14–Feb. 24, Mar. 18–Apr. 21, May 20–June 9, 2002)
• Coached by her father, Stefano Capriati and here with trainer Lisa Austin

Bartoli Quick Facts
Age: 18 WTA Tour career singles titles: none WTA Tour career prize money: $206,794

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Third appearance at Roland Garros but first time as a direct entrant; received wildcards in 2001 and 2002, ranked No.447 and No.224 respectively; in 2001, l. to Castaño in straight sets; in 2002, l. to world No.32 and No.26 seed Sugiyama 75 third set
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 12)
SEMIFINALIST (1): Canberra; QUARTERFINALIST (2): Miami, Strasbourg
• After three-set loss to former champion Talaja in Gold Coast 1r, reached career-first Tour SF at Canberra as a qualifier, d. No.7 seed Granville in 2r before falling to No.5 seed Schiavone; afterwards, broke into Top 100 at No.92; fell in 1r of next three events, at Australian Open (l. to Maleeva), Paris [Indoors] (l. to Matevzic; reached doubles final w/Cohen Aloro) and Scottsdale qualifying (l. to Cohen Aloro 76 third set; reached doubles w/Cohen Aloro); qualified for Indian Wells, reaching 2r (l. to No.8 seed Rubin); also qualified for Miami and reached her second career QF (first at a Tier I); d. world No.6 Davenport in 4r when Davenport retired with a right hamstring strain (l. to S.Williams); qualified for Sarasota, falling 1r to compatriot Pierce; also qualified for Charleston, falling 1r to Garbin in 3s; l. 1r at Amelia Island and Berlin qualifying; reached third QF of the year at Strasbourg, falling to No.6 seed Zvonareva
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Tour-best result has been SF finish at 2003 Canberra; also reached QF at 2003 Miami and Strasbourg; made Grand Slam debut at 2001 Roland Garros as a wildcard; won first Grand Slam matches in reaching 3r at 2002 US Open, d. Sánchez-Vicario en route; reached No.3 on ITF Junior singles rankings, winning US Open in 2001; winner of five ITF Women’s Circuit singles titles, most recently at 2002 ITF/Poiters-FRA
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.59 (26 May 2003 – present)
• Coached by her father, Walter Bartoli
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ATP Review Day 3 ... May 28 ... 

The longest round

With the James Blake-Ivan Ljubicic match to be completed, six of the 16 men’s matches played Wednesday went the full five sets, averaging 3 hours, 30 minutes. This presents the possibility that 2003 Roland Garros could come close to or surpass the Open Era Roland Garros record for most five-set matches in the second round. In 1992 and 1995, the tournament had 10 five-set matches in the second round.

 

The second-most five set matches in the second round at Roland Garros is nine, which occurred in 2000.

 

The Comeback, Part III

Andre Agassi’s comeback from two sets to love down against Mario Ancic was his fifth such comeback in 41 career five-set matches. Interestingly, the last three have occurred at Roland Garros, most spectacularly in the 1999 final when he defeated Andrei Medvedev 16 26 64 63 64. Last year here, he came back against Frenchman Paul-Henri Mathieu in the round of 16, winning 46 36 63 63 63.

 

If Agassi’s comeback last year against Mathieu was an example of experience prevailing over youth, since Agassi was almost 12 years older, this was the sequel – only better – with Agassi fully 14 years older than Ancic.

 

Agassi’s comeback enabled him to surpass Pete Sampras on the all-time match wins list, making Agassi the winningest active player in men’s tennis. His 763 victories put him solely in sixth place on the all-time list for the Open Era.

 

Rank

Player

Career

win-loss

1.

Jimmy Connors

1155-270

2.

Ivan Lendl

1068-242

3.

Guillermo Vilas

940-286

4.

John McEnroe

881-198

5.

Stefan Edberg

806-270

6.

Andre Agassi*

763-233

7.

Pete Sampras*

762-222

8.

Ilie Nastase

722-287

9.

Boris Becker

713-214

10.

Michael Chang*

661-307

- Players in bold started at 2003 Roland Garros

* denotes active players

 

As time goes by

Roland Garros lost the second of its six former champions Wednesday when 1996 champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov lost to Flavio Saretta 64 36 60 67 64 in the second round. On Tuesday, 1989 champion Michael Chang said good-bye to Roland Garros forever when he lost to Fabrice Santoro. Interestingly, of the six men in the 2003 Roland Garros draw who have won the Coupe de Musketeers, the two who won their titles longest ago are the two who have been eliminated. Still remaining are 1997, 2000 and 2001 champion Gustavo Kuerten, 1998 champion Carlos Moya, 1999 champion Andre Agassi and 2002 champion Albert Costa.

 

Kafelnikov’s results here have been consistently inconsistent throughout his career. He has advanced to the quarterfinals or better five times and lost in the third round or sooner six times – now five times in the second round.

 

Parisian Magic Vanishes

Paris has been a magical city for Mikhail Youzhny. Six months ago at Bercy, he claimed the Davis Cup title for Russia by winning a historic fifth rubber in the Davis Cup Final against France. Two days ago, he won for the first time at Roland Garros. The magic went “poof” on Wednesday as qualifier Attila Savolt defeated Youzhny 36 64 57 62 64.

 Déjà vu again

If Carlos Moya’s second round victory against Mark Philippoussis seemed familiar, there is a reason. On Wednesday, Moya defeated Philippoussis 62 64 76 to advance to the third round. Last year, Moya defeated Philippoussis 62 76 76 to advance to the third round.
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MEN’S REVIEW
Day Two – 27 May 2003

Phew! Costa escapes ignominy
Albert Costa played 65 tournaments without winning a title before capturing the 2002 Roland Garros crown. Now in his first title defense in almost three years, he came within a game of becoming the first Roland Garros defending champion of the Open Era to lose in the first round. Costa trailed lucky loser Sergio Roitman 76 62 41 before coming back to win 67 26 75 62 62. It was Costa’s first career comeback from two-sets-to-love down.

The earliest loss by a Roland Garros defending champion in the Open Era is the second round, which has happened three times: in 2000, when 1999 champion Andre Agassi lost to Karol Kucera 26 75 61 60; in 1998, when ’97 champ Gustavo Kuerten lost to Marat Safin 36 76 36 61 64; and in 1973, when ’72 champion Andres Gimeno lost to Guillermo Vilas 62 57 86. Among all four Grand Slam tournaments, a defending champion has lost in the first round three times. Most recently at the 1999 US Open, 1998 champion Patrick Rafter lost in the first round to Cedric Pioline when a rotator cuff injury in Rafter’s right shoulder forced him to retire after losing the first game of the fifth set. At the 1997 Australian Open, defending champion Boris Becker lost in the first round to eventual runner-up Carlos Moya. The first defending champion to lose in the first round of a Grand Slam tournament was Roscoe Tanner, who won the January 1977 Australian Open, but lost in the December 1977 Australian Open first round to New Zealander Chris Lewis.

Americans left looking for “old” glory
Thirteen Americans began at 2003 Roland Garros, but after the completion of the first round, only four remain. Interestingly, three of the four – Andre Agassi (33), Todd Martin (32) and Vince Spadea (28) – were among the four oldest U.S. men in the draw. The fourth American man among this group is 23-year-old James Blake.

With so few American men through to the second round, U.S. men are in danger of having their worst representation in the third round of a major in the Open Era. To date, the fewest American men to advance to the third round of a Grand Slam tournament is one. First in 1998 and again in 2000, only one U.S. man reached the third round at Roland Garros. Because he played his final match at Roland Garros today, it is interesting to note that Michael Chang was that one man in both of those years. (Note: No American men played in the Australian Open in both 1972 and 1973.)

Of the four American men remaining, only Agassi and Spadea have advanced to the third round here in the past six years, Agassi having done so three times (winning the title in 1999 and losing in the quarterfinals in 2001 and 2002) and Spadea having done so twice (losing in the third round in 1999 and 2002).

Brother can you spare a win?
The two sets of brothers who began men’s singles at Roland Garros had identical results in the first round: the older brother won, while baby brother was relegated to a cheerleader role. Former Roland Garros boys’ doubles champion Nicolas Lapentti, 26, today advanced to the second round when French wild card Richard Gasquet retired from their match because of cramping in his right hand while trailing 63 76 30. Twenty-year-old Giovanni Lapentti, however, retired from his first round match against Tommy Robredo because of leg cramps despite leading 63 67 63 13.

Christophe Rochus, 24, won his first-round match Monday, defeating Hermes Garmonal 75 63 63. Today, younger brother Olivier Rochus, 22, held a two-sets-to-love lead against Federico Browne, but lost 46 26 61 61 63.
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WTA / Match Notes Round 2 / Top Half....

(1) SERENA WILLIAMS (USA #1) vs. MARIE-GAIANEH MIKAELIAN (SUI #39)
Head-to-Head: First Meeting

S.Williams Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: 22 WTA Tour career prize money: $11,332,679

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her fifth appearance here; in 1998 debut held 64 52 lead on eventual winner Sanchez-Vicario; in 2001, extended eventual winner Capriati to 3s in QF; won title last year beating world No.1 Capriati and No.2 Venus Williams en route
2003 TO DATE (Events played - 5)
WINNER (3): Australian Open, Paris Indoors, Miami; FINALIST (1): Charleston; SEMIFINALIST (1): Rome
• Started season by winning her first 21 matches in three-title sweep of Australian Open (d. Clijsters in SF, saving 2 mp and V.Williams in final in 3s to complete non-calendar year Grand Slam), Paris Indoors (d. Mauresmo in final) and Miami (d. Capriati in final in 3s); winning streak ended in Charleston final (l. to Henin-Hardenne), her first loss since falling to another Belgian, Clijsters, in season-ending Championships final in November; represented USA in Fed Cup World Group 1r tie vs. Czech Republic, winning both singles rubbers and partnering Venus to win doubles; semifinalist in Rome falling to Mauresmo in 3s after serving for the match leading 61, 54; first losses at consecutive tournaments since Charleston-Berlin 2002
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of 22 WTA Tour singles titles, including the past four Grand Slams, becoming only the fifth woman in history to hold all four major singles crowns at one time; winner of 2002 Roland Garros, Wimbledon and US Open and 2003 Australian Open, d. sister Venus in each final; in winner of 11 doubles titles, six of those Grand Slams (all w/Venus and at least one at each Grand Slam); attained world No.1 ranking on 8 July 2002 by reaching Wimbledon final, replacing Venus in the top spot; has been ranked No.1 ever since
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.1 for 47 weeks (8 July 2002 – present)
• Coached by her father, Richard Williams and mother, Oracene Price; here with trainer Kerrie Brooks and hitting partner Jovan Savic

Mikaelian Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: 1 WTA Tour career prize money: $326,639

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her second appearance here after losing in the second round last year to Schiavone in 3s
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 10)
FINALIST (1): Gold Coast; THIRD ROUND (1): Berlin
• Reached fourth career Tour singles final at Gold Coast earlier this year d. No. 7 seed Majoli and No. 1 Schnyder en route before falling to Dechy in 3s; retired 1r Australian Open vs. Gagliardi (trailing 16 02) with a left rib stress fracture; returned at Miami losing to Gagliardi; reached 2r of Sarasota and Charleston falling to Dechy on both occasions; stretched No. 3 seed Capriati 64, 76 in 2r; reached 3r Berlin d. No. 13 seed Sugiyama and stretched Hantuchova to 76 final set
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of one WTA Tour career singles title at 2002 Tashkent and reached two finals at 2002 Quebec City and 2001 Basel; has played some of her career-best tennis on home soil: reached her first WTA Tour final in 2001 Basel and later qualified for Tier I event in Zurich d. No. 13 Dementieva before falling to No. 1 Capriati; in 2002, scored two Top 15 wins over Maleeva and Myskina en route to QF again in Zurich
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No. 33 (Jan. 27 – Feb. 1, 2003)
• Coached by her parents Marguerite and Georges

(4) JUSTINE HENIN-HARDENNE (BEL #4) vs. JELENA KOSTANIC (CRO #109)
Head-to-Head: Henin-Hardenne leads 1-0
Last Meeting: 1999 Luxembourg, R16 Indoor Carpet, Henin-Hardenne won 60, 26, 61

Henin-Hardenne Quick Facts
Age: 20 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,171,138

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making her fourth appearance here; semifinalist in 2001 holding a 62, 42 lead on compatriot Clijsters before falling in 3s; last year as No.5 seed was suffering from bronchitis and fell 1r to qualifier Kapros in 3s; right elbow injury prevented her from taking part in 2000; in 1999 2r almost stunned world No.2 Davenport on Court Central before falling 75 final set
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 8)
WINNER (3): Dubai, Charleston, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (4): Sydney, Australian Open, Antwerp, Amelia Island
• Began season as semifinalist in Sydney (losing to eventual winner Clijsters 62 63) and Australian Open, surviving marathon 4r vs. Davenport in second longest match (in terms of total games played) played there from 4r on in the Open Era, winning 75 57 97 before being halted by world No.2 V.Williams in SF; in Antwerp, reached SF, falling to compatriot Clijsters 62 76(3) after trailing 5-2 second set; won title at Dubai as top seed, d. No.3 seed Capriati in SF and No.4 seed Seles in F; reached QF in Miami falling to Rubin; scored first ever-win over a world No.1 when she ended Serena Williams unbeaten 21-0 run in 2003 in the final of Charleston on April 13; fell in SF Amelia Island as top seed to Dementieva after holding a mp; joined Graf as only second player in Berlin tournament’s history to retain the German Open d. Mauresmo (saving sp in first set) and Clijsters (saving 3 mps in 3rd set)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of nine WTA Tour singles titles and two doubles titles; runner-up at 2001 Wimbledon and semifinalist at 2001 Roland Garros, 2002 Wimbledon and 2003 Australian Open; one of only four current players (along with Clijsters, Seles & Davenport) to have wins over S.Williams, V.Williams and Capriati; in 1999, won Antwerp in her Tour debut, becoming the fifth player at that stage to achieve that feat; member of Belgian Fed Cup team 2000-03 (winning title in 2001)
CAREER-HIGH RANKING & COACH
• No.4 (October 28 – November 10, 2002; January 27, 2003 - present)
• Coached by Carlos Rodriguez since 1996

Kostanic Quick Facts
Age: 21 WTA Tour career singles titles: none WTA Tour career prize money: $404,138

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making third appearance here, falling in the second round last year in 2002
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 13)
THIRD ROUND (1): Indian Wells
• Lost her first five matches of the year before winning a qualifying match in Dubai and reaching the third round of Indian Wells (d. No. 32 seed Husarova in 3s before falling to No. 8 Chanda Rubin); reached 2r Estoril and qualified for Berlin d. Muller before falling to Mauresmo; qualified for Strasbourg falling to Pisnik
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Best singles results on the WTA Tour have been reaching the semifinals of 2001 Vienna and 2000 Antwerp; Winner of four doubles titles, most recently at 2002 Warsaw and Strasbourg; member of Croatian Fed Cup team 2000-03
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No. 63 (June 10-23, 2002)
• Coached by Velimir Zerker

(5) AMÉLIE MAURESMO (FRA #5) vs. LINA KRASNOROUTSKAYA (RUS #48)
Head-to-Head: Mauresmo leads 2-0
Last Meeting: 2003 Rome, R32 Clay, Mauresmo won 62, 76(5)

Mauresmo Quick Facts
Age: 23 WTA Tour career singles titles: 9 WTA Tour career prize money: $3,557,136

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Ninth consecutive appearance in here; best result was reaching 4r last year (falling to Suarez in 3s) and 2002 (losing to Seles)
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 7)
WINNER (1): Warsaw; FINALIST (2): Paris Indoors, Rome; SEMIFINALIST (2): Dubai, Berlin; QUARTERFINALIST (1): Indian Wells
• Missed four months due to right knee cartilage inflammation returning at Paris [Indoors], reaching final, d. Dementieva 60, 60 before l. to S.Williams; withdrew from Antwerp due to left adductor strain; semifinalist at Dubai as defending champion, retiring to Seles trailing 36 22 due to a right adductor strain; seeded No.5 at Indian Wells, reached QF and scheduled to play No.4 seed Davenport but pulled out with an acute throat infection; seeded No.8, reached 4r at Miami, l. to No.12 seed Rubin; representing France in Fed Cup World Group 1r vs. Colombia, d. Zuluaga and Castaño to guide her country into QF; collected ninth Tour singles title and first of 2003 at Warsaw as No.2 seed; in final, scored first win over V.Williams in six meeting when Williams retired trailing 67(6) 60 30 with a left abdominal strain; SF in Berlin falling to eventual champion Henin-Hardenne; reached third Italian Open final in four years d. Capriati and S. Williams (first win in five meetings) after Williams was two points from victory; fell to Clijsters in 3s final and after her ranking returned to Top Five for only ninth week of her career (May-June 2001, September-October 2002)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Winner of nine WTA Tour career singles titles, most recently at 2003 Warsaw and incl. 2000 Sydney, d. Top 3 seeds (No.3 Pierce, No.2 Davenport, No.1 Hingis) and 2001 German Open (d. Capriati and Hingis back-to-back for her fourth title in five events); unseeded, runner-up at 1999 Australian Open, d. world No.1 Davenport in SF before falling to No.2 Hingis; also a semifinalist at 2002 Wimbledon and US Open (d. No.3 Capriati on both occasions); winner of one Tour doubles title at 2000 Linz (w/Rubin); member of French Fed Cup Team in 1998-99 and 2001-03
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.4 (7-27 October 2002)
• Coached by Loic Courteau since Rome 2002

Krasnoroutskaya Quick Facts
Age: 19 WTA Tour career singles titles: none WTA Tour career prize money: $525,254

ROLAND GARROS HISTORY
• Making third appearance in this event, having missed last year due to left ankle sprain suffered at Australian Open; previously 1r in 2000 and QF in 2001 (seventh youngest ever to get that far in this tournament) d. No. 11 Tauziat before falling to Henin-Hardenne
2003 TO DATE (Events played – 10)
WINNER (3): Dubai, Charleston, Berlin; SEMIFINALIST (4): Sydney
• Playing her ninth main draw event this year; started season by qualifying for Gold Coast, d. Zuluaga 1r before falling to Shaughnessy 63 76(6); after failing to qualify for Australian Open, qualifed for Tokyo [Pan Pacific], d. fellow Russians Petrova and Bovina (both in 3s) before falling to Seles in QF; as a WC, reached SF at Doha, d. No.1 seed and defending champion Seles in 2r and No.7 seed Martinez before falling to compatriot Likhovsteva; in Dubai, reached third straight QF, d. world No.13 Schnyder in 2r (l. to Mauresmo); qualified for Sarasota but fell in 1r; l. 1r in Charleston, 2r in Amelia Island, 2r of Rome (l. Mauresmo) and 2r of Strasbourg (after upsetting No. 4 seed Daniilidou)
CAREER IN REVIEW
• Twice a semifinalist on the WTA Tour, at 1999 Luxembourg (as a 15-year-old wildcard, d. Maleeva and Farina Elia before falling to Van Roost after leading 75 30) and 2002 Pattaya (l. to Cho); has reached five other QF, at 2001 Roland Garros (seventh youngest at that event at 17 years, one month), Doha and Dubai (the last two in consecutive weeks) 2002 Bali and 2003 Dubai; a member of the Russian Fed Cup Team in 2001; in doubles, twice a runner-up, at 2001 Moscow (w/Dementieva) and 2002 Pattaya (w/Panova); has finished all four of her full seasons on Tour ranked inside Top 200, including a Top 50 finish (No.34) in 2001; missed six months of 2002 due to left ankle injury sustained in 1r of Australian Open
CAREER-HIGH SINGLES RANKING & COACH
• No.34 (5 November 2001 – 6 January 2002)
• Coached by her parents, Vladimir and Marina
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ROLAND GARROS
MEN’S REVIEW
Day One – 26 May 2003

Tooting his own Horna
The third time was indeed the charm for Luis Horna. Playing in his third Grand Slam tournament match, Horna earned his first Grand Slam tournament match win, upsetting No. 5 seed Roger Federer 76 62 76 in the first round. Horna had lost previously to John van Lottum in the first round of the 2002 US Open and to Fernando Vicente in the first round of the 2003 Australian Open.

Horna is the first Peruvian to win a match at Roland Garros since Jaime Yzaga defeated Michael Chang 62 63 57 16 75 in the third round in 1994. Of the seven Peruvians before Horna who have played Roland Garros in the Open Era, only Pablo Arraya in 1982 and ’83 and Yzaga in 1986, ’89, ’91 and ’94 have won at least one match here. Yzaga’s round of 16 finish in 1994 is the best result by a Peruvian at Roland Garros in the Open Era.

Seeds start to tumble
Although Roland Garros in 2001 became the site of Roger Federer’s first Grand Slam tournament quarterfinal, it has since become an annual nightmare. For the second consecutive year, Federer has lost in straight sets in the first round. The hope for Federer now, after his 76 62 76 loss to Luis Horna, must be that he does not fall into the slump that followed his 2002 Roland Garros first-round loss to Hicham Arazi. Last year’s loss to Arazi was at the start of a period in which Federer lost his first match in five of eight events.

No. 10 seed Paradorn Srichaphan bears the distinction of being the first men’s seed to lose at 2003 Roland Garros, falling to 1999 Roland Garros semifinalist Dominik Hrbaty 64 36 60 75. Srichaphan was his own worse enemy, double faulting 14 times, including three in a row in the final game of the third set. Hrbaty, meanwhile, had only two double faults.

No. 16 Alex Corretja lost in the first round at Roland Garros for the first time in a decade, falling to Galo Blanco 57 63 60 75. Corretja, who had advanced to at least the quarterfinals each of the past five years – including runner-up finishes in 1998 and 2001 – had not lost in the first round here since 1993 when he fell to Magnus Larsson 26 63 76 76 in what was Corretja’s third career Grand Slam tournament match.

From Down Under and down, but not over and out… again
Exactly 365 days after winning his first five-set match from two sets to love down, Mark Philippoussis did it again. Philippoussis, two points from losing in straight sets to American qualifier Alex Kim, came back to win 26 67 75 62 62. Last year in the first round of Roland Garros, Philippoussis came back from two sets to love down to defeat French qualifier Julien Varlet 16 67 64 76 63.

Philippoussis had been on the tour eight years and played 14 five-set matches before earning his first five-set comeback from two sets down. He has now achieved this feat twice in his last four five-set matches. Somehow it seems appropriate that this would occur at Roland Garros. Philippoussis played and won his first career five-set match at Roland Garros, defeating Nicklas Kulti 62 46 36 64 64 in the first round in 1997.


2003 ROLAND GARROS
DAY ONE MEN’S NOTES
Monday 26 May 2003
First Round Bottom Half

Show court matches

PHILIPPE CHATRIER: No. 5 Roger Federer (SUI) v Luis Horna (PER)
No. 2 Andre Agassi (USA) v Karol Beck (SVK)

SUZANNE LENGLEN: No. 23 Younes El Aynaoui (MAR) v Anthony Dupuis (FRA)
No. 17 Yevgeny Kafelnikov (RUS) v Julien Boutter (FRA)

COURT 1: No. 4 Carlos Moya (ESP) v (LL) Filippo Volandri (ITA)
No. 13 Jiri Novak (CZE) v (WC) Julien Benneteau (FRA)

COURT 2: No. 11 Rainer Schuettler (GER) v Cecil Mamiit (USA)
No. 31 Juan Ignacio Chela (ARG) v (WC) Cyril Saulnier (FRA)

COURT 3: No. 16 Alex Corretja (ESP) v (Q) Galo Blanco (ESP)
No. 7 Guillermo Coria (ARG) v Andre Sa (BRA)

COURT 6: No. 26 Xavier Malisse (BEL) v (Q) Alex Calatrava (ESP)
Mark Philippoussis (AUS) v (Q) Alex Kim (USA)

COURT 7: No. 10 Paradorn Srichaphan (THA) v Dominik Hrbaty (SVK)
No. 24 James Blake (USA) v Taylor Dent (USA)

On court today…

• Three of the six former Roland Garros champions in the draw begin pursuit of their second Roland Garros title: 1996 champion Yevgeny Kafelnikov opens against Frenchman Julien Boutter, 1998 champion Carlos Moya opens against Filippo Volandri and 1999 champion Andre Agassi opens against Karol Beck.

• No. 5 seed Roger Federer attempts to extend his winning streak in France to six matches when he meets former Roland Garros junior runner-up Luis Horna.

• Having spent a portion of their childhoods in the same house, No. 16 seed Alex Corretja and Galo Blanco square off for the first time in a Grand Slam tournament.

• A U.S. “Next Generation” showdown sees No. 24 seed James Blake attempting to spoil Taylor Dent’s Roland Garros debut, during which Dent is attempting to win his first career clay court match.

• Hamburg champion Guillermo Coria looks to extend his six-match winning streak against fellow South American Andre Sa, who has not won a match since late October 2002.

• Facing Mark Philippoussis, qualifier Alex Kim attempts to win his first tour-level clay court match today. He has played just three so far, losing all.
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Haas pulls out of French!!!
German ex-world N° 2 (May 2002) Tommy Haas has withdrawn from this year's tournament. Haas has not played competitively since the Masters tournament in Paris last November following a string of injuries, notably to his shoulder. Haas will be replaced by a lucky-loser.-

MARAT SAFIN and American Robby Ginepri withdrew
The American Robby Ginepri and the Russian Marat Safin have both pulled out of the French Open due to wrist injuries. They will be replaced in the final men's singles draw by the American Cecil Mamiit and the Argentine Mariano Puerta. In the ladies' singles, luxembourg's Anne Kremer (wrist injury) and Sweden's Asa Svensson (ankle injury) have both withdrawn. They are replaced respectively by Akiko Morigami (Japan) and Libuse Prusova (Cze).
Hot on the heels of Thomas Johansson, Kristian Pless and Guillermo Canas, three others new names have just been added to the list of absentees from the men's singles tournament. The Croat Goran Ivanisevic (foot injury), America's Pete Sampras (absent from the circuit since his victory at the US Open in September 2002) and the Frenchman Arnaud Di Pasquale (slipped disc) have all been forced to pull out. The trio's tribulations have presented an opportunity to Switzerland's Marc Rosset, France's Mickaël Llodra and the young Spaniard Rafael Nadal (17 years old on 3rd June), granting them entry into the big event.
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